Palmatifid

having the subdivisions of a simple organ (usually a leaf) arranged palmately.

Panicle

an inflorescence where the rachis either subdivides into several branches, or is furnished with distinct branching peduncles.

Panicled

having the flowers arranged in a panicle.

Papilionaceous

an irregular corolla composed of five petals, the upper of which forms the standard; two others, placed laterally, the wings; and two (opposite the standard, and more or less cohering) form the keel.

Papillose

covered with small elongated cellular protuberances.

Pappus

the peculiar limb to the calyx of the florets of Composite flowers, and frequently hairy or downy as in thistles.

Parallel

where the axes of two parts he parallel to each other.

Parasite

a plant which grows on some other plant, and obtains nourishment directly from its juices.

Parietal

attached to the inner surface of the pericarp.

Partite

divided nearly to the base.

Patent

spreading.

Pectinate

pinnatifid with the segments parallel, narrow, and close, like the teeth in a comb.

Pedate

having the parts arranged in a palmate manner, with the addition of further subdivisions in the lateral portions.

Pedicel

the partial stalk or immediate support of a flower in an inflorescence composed of flowers arranged upon a main peduncle.

Pedicellate

furnished with a pedicel.

Peduncle

the main stalk or support to the inflorescence, more especially when this is limited to a solitary flower.

Pedunculate

furnished with a peduncle.

Pellucid

perfectly or partially transparent.

Peltate

where a support is inserted at some distance within the margin, and is not in the same plane as the flat surface which rests upon it.

Pendent

pendulous, inclined so that the apex is pointed vertically downwards.

Pentadelphous

having the stamens arranged in five sets or bundles.

Pentamerous

having the parts in fives or multiples of five.

Perennial

enduring for several years.

Perfoliate

applied to clasping leaves which have their basal lobes united, so that the axis about which they are placed appears to pass through them.

Perianth

the external floral whorl or whorls which surround the stamens and pistil, including the parts answering to calyx and corolla, when they are so much alike as not to be readily distinguishable.

Perigone

almost the same as Perianth, but more especially used when the floral envelopes arc reduced to a single floral whorl, possessing a calyx-like character.

Perigynous

having the ovary free, but either the stamens or corolla adherent to the calyx.