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Field, Forest, And Wayside Flowers | by Maud Going (E. M. Hardinge)



With chapters on Grasses, Sedges and Ferns. Untechnical studies for unlearned lovers of nature.

TitleField, Forest, And Wayside Flowers
AuthorMaud Going (E. M. Hardinge)
PublisherThe Baker & Taylor Co.
Year1899
Copyright1899, The Baker & Taylor Co.
AmazonField, Forest, and Wayside Flowers
Field, Forest, and Wayside Flowers.

Illustrated in part with Drawings from life by S. G. Porter and Photographs by Edwin M. Lincoln.

-Foreword
The chapters of this book are so arranged as to follow the waxing and waning of plant-life during an average season in the northeastern United States. By this plan a few repetitions have been absol...
-Chapter I. Crocuses
As sweet desire of day before the day, As dreams of love before the true love born, From the outer edge of winter over-worn, The ghost arisen of May before the May Takes through dim air her unawakene...
-Crocuses. Part 2
This spot, - the stigmatic surface, - is the goal of the microspores. It is very various in its appearance in different flowers. Sometimes it is a little knob, sometimes a small point, sometimes, as i...
-Crocuses. Part 3
Bees are by no means the only pollen-carriers employed by flowers. A large number of blossoms entrust their fate, or rather the fate of their posterity, to the mercy of the wind. Others, which grow...
-Chapter II. Dandelions
Gold such as thine ne'er drew the Spanish prow, Through the primeval hush of Indian seas, Nor wrinkled the lean brow, Of age, to rob the lover's heart of ease. Tis the spring's largess, which sh...
-Dandelions. Continued
The pistil matures a little later than the stamens do-. It is long and narrow, and is divided at its summit into two arms, which at first are raised upright and closely pressed together (Fig. 4). In t...
-Chapter III. In April Weather
There is no summer fulness in the winds, - Only the dreamy stirring of the dawn, - When sweet, ecstatic spring awakes and finds The winter gone. - C. B. Going. In earlier April the country is ap...
-In April Weather. Continued
Probably both authorities are right, and the habits of the trees are even now undergoing a change. It may be that the elms, which are gradually learning to bear stamens and pistils in separate flowers...
-Chapter IV. The Flowering Of The Forest-Trees
And now in age I bud again, After so many deaths I live and write; I once more smell the dew and rain, And relish versing. O my Only Light, It cannot be That I am he On whom Thy tempests fell all ...
-The Flowering Of The Forest-Trees. Part 2
The embryo nuts of the walnut, butternut, hickory, and beech, and the baby-acorns, appear on this year's new wood. The buds from which they have issued tipped the branches and contained, besides the p...
-The Flowering Of The Forest-Trees. Part 3
The horse-chestnut blossoms also cooperate. The pyramidal bunch of bloom is not a crowd of individuals each self-contained and self-sufficient. It is more like the ant and bee communities, in which ea...
-The Flowering Of The Forest-Trees. Part 4
We have seen that some of our familiar trees seem to be passing through changes in the structure and mode of fertilization of their flowers. Others are even now diminishing the number of their seeds. ...
-Chapter V. Green Leaves At Work
Between the budding and the falling leaf, Stretch happy skies, With colors and sweet cries, Of mating birds in uplands and in glades. The world is rife. - T. B. Aldrich. When spring, long waited ...
-Green Leaves At Work. Part 2
In the jelly which fills the leaf-cells there are floating specks of green, so vivid in color, and so numerous, as to give their hue to the whole leaf. These specks are chlorophyll bodies, and they ar...
-Green Leaves At Work. Part 3
There is a lower depth of parasitism than this, in which the plant steals digested food from its victim. When this stage of degradation is reached the foliage of the parasite dwindles, and its green c...
-Green Leaves At Work. Part 4
The water which ascends from the roots of a growing plant into its leaves holds in solution about as much mineral matter as is contained in ordinary well-water. The warmth of the summer air causes som...
-Green Leaves At Work. Part 5
The cactus family has a few representatives which grow wild as far north as Nantucket, but most of its members live in the hottest situations in tropic or semi-tropic lands. In such localities there i...
-Chapter VI. Lily-Kin And Rose-Kin
Let us change the subject, and talk about lilies and roses. - E. Buxton. FROM time out of mind there has been a close companionship between the lily and the rose. They have bloomed together in al...
-Lily-Kin And Rose-Kin. Part 2
But the lily's many kin have each, as the ponderous term monocotyledon implies, but a single seed-leaf. In the ripe grain- or grass-seed it has a peculiar shield-like form, and it is wrapped completel...
-Lily-Kin And Rose-Kin. Part 3
The student afield, with no equipment save a penknife and a pocket-lens, and with mayhap but a limited stock of patience, is content to know that this woody thread is a fibro-vascular bundle, and that...
-Lily-Kin And Rose-Kin. Part 4
By the end of summer, however, a transverse section of the bundle in question will show no actively-dividing constructive cells. The formation of new substances is over for the season, and each fibro-...
-Lily-Kin And Rose-Kin. Part 5
Incredible as it may sound, the calla is not a flower, and the snowy spathe which enfolds its golden head is neither a petal nor a sisterhood of petals. It is a foliage-leaf, become big and beautifu...
-Chapter VII. Grasses
Praised be my Lord for our mother the earth, the which doth sustain us, and keep us, and bringeth forth divers fruits, and flowers of many colors and grass. - Song of the Creatures, by Francis of As...
-Grasses. Part 2
Sand-storms, once the terror of the town, were thus entirely prevented. We have now laws for the protection of forests, and it has been suggested that government might, with equal wisdom, concern i...
-Grasses. Part 3
The oat of commerce is a typical grass, and from a study of its parts one can gain knowledge on the structure of grasses in general. To a casual glance there is little difference between the oat-bl...
-Grasses. Part 4
The whole affair is known to botany as a caryopsis, and to the general public as a grain (Fig. 42). The innermost integument clings tightly to the seed, and each succeeding one adheres to the one be...
-Chapter VIII. Rushes And Sedges
When as the breezes pass The gleaming rushes lean a thousand ways. - Lowell. THE wind has many fosterlings in the outdoor world, but the grasses, rushes, and sedges are, in a peculiar sense, h...
-Rushes And Sedges. Part 2
One of the wood-rushes still shows remarkable approximation to the conditions of insect-fertilized flowers, and two of them are visited, now and then, by insects. It seems probable that the little ...
-Rushes And Sedges. Part 3
The number three dominates the sedges throughout their organization. It occurs repeatedly, or is traced obscurely, in their flowers, for they are lily-kin. Inferentially the ancestors of all the sedge...
-Chapter IX. Night Flowers
WHEN night finds us in quiet homes, with quiet minds and bodies pleasantly tired, there may come to us the thought of those to whom the evening is as a morning, and whose wakeful and busy time is just...
-Night Flowers. Part 2
The white day or Japan lily (Funkia japonica) (Fig. 56) opens about sundown, giving forth an alluring sweetness. I have never seen a winged insect accept this seductive invitation, but as the long blo...
-Night Flowers. Part 3
The most familiar nocturnal wild-flower east of the Alleghanies is the evening primrose (CEnothera biennis) (Fig. 58). It is extremely common everywhere in the Northern Atlantic states - along roadsid...
-Night Flowers. Part 4
Fig. 62. - Bouncing Bet (Saponaria officinalis). Some of the pink family have adapted themselves so nearly to the requirements of their chosen guests that they have become unfitted for miscella...
-Chapter X. Climbing Plants
The vine has served rhetoricians ever since the Dark Ages as a type of clinging helplessness and utter dependence. It has symbolized the condition of woman under the old regime, before she entered the...
-Climbing Plants. Continued
The first purpose of the spontaneous revolving movement, says Darwin, is to enable the shoot to find its support. This is admirably effected by the revolutions carried on night and day, a wider and...
-Chapter XI. The Sporing Of The Fern
We have the receipt of fern-seed We walk invisible. - King Henry the Fourth. WHEN Falstaff, of delightsome - though not of blessed - memory, had perpetrated a number of lawless deeds, without ...
-The Sporing Of The Fern. Part 2
The prothalli of the adders'-tongues and of the club-mosses are generally tuberous, and grow half buried in the soil, or beneath its surface. Those of the ferns and horsetails are green and leaf-like....
-The Sporing Of The Fern. Part 3
A prothallus may form a number of archegonia before a spermotozoid finds its way into any one of them. But as soon as an archegonium is fertilized no new ones appear, and the remaining life of the pro...
-Chapter XII. The Seniors Of The Forest
Cedars blossom, though few people know it, And look all dipped in sunshine like a poet. - Lowell. The evergeen woods have a character distinctively their own. This is most evident in winter, w...
-The Seniors Of The Forest. Part 2
But the needles of pines, hemlocks, and firs shed the flakes from their curved and shining surfaces and allow them to fall through the feathery branches toward the ground. Snow occasionally gathers up...
-The Seniors Of The Forest. Part 3
Cedars and junipers make an especially effective wind-screen, and on the eve of a bitter night little birds gather in numbers on the branches of these trees, close to the trunk. The habit of growth...
-The Seniors Of The Forest. Part 4
Darwin has pointed out that in parts of the world where the summers are short and chill the land belongs to wind-fertilized plants, rushes, grasses, sedges, and cone-bearers. And so the plants whic...
-The Seniors Of The Forest. Part 5
Two sorts of selaginella are cultivated under the name of lycopodium, and may be seen draping the stages in greenhouses, or making a moss-like mat all over the floor in florists' windows. These plan...
-The Seniors Of The Forest. Part 6
Once it was thought that a great gulf was fixed between the flowerless and the flowering plants. But further study has shown that this gulf is bridged, and that the two piers which support the bridge ...
-Chapter XIII. Dogbane And Milkweed
They lay wait as he that setteth snares. - Jeremiah v. 26. The story of the trap-setting and insect-eating plants is a more than twice-told tale. The pitcher-plant, which beguiles the hapless ...
-Dogbane And Milkweed. Continued
The milkweed is a peculiarly - constructed and very highly-organized flower. The sepals and the petals, each five in number, fold back as soon as the flower opens and press closely against the flower-...
-Chapter XIV. Thistles And Nettles
And the thorns which make us think Of the thornless river brink Where the ransomed tread. - Mrs. Browning. The Book of Genesis teaches that thorns and thistles grew out of the cursed ground, i...
-Thistles And Nettles. Part 2
The botanist draws a distinction between a prickle and a thorn. A prickle can be removed with ease from the stem or leaf on which it grows. It is not incorporated with the wood, but merely, and often ...
-Thistles And Nettles. Part 3
We are all familiar with the oft-quoted lines: Tender-handed stroke a nettle and it stings you for your pains, etc. They were written by Aaron Hill on a window in Scotland. Their thought is more ter...
-Thistles And Nettles. Part 4
The swamp-thistle, with flower-tubes longer than those of its Canadian cousin, has a smaller circle of insect friends, and the common thistle, with still deeper florets, is more exclusive still. But a...
-Chapter XV. A Handful Of Weeds
All the idle weeds that grow In our sustaining corn. - King Lear. Old Noah Webster defines a weed as a useless and troublesome plant, i.e., a vegetable vagabond, not only idle, but mischievou...
-A Handful Of Weeds. Continued
But other members of the Compositae family have no outflashing rays, but are made up entirely of trumpet-shaped florets like those in the yellow centre of the daisy. These are called Tubuliflorae, t...
-Chapter XVI. The Sleeping Of The Fields
A Sabbath of rest unto the land. - Leviticus xxv. 4. UNLESS one is blessed with a contented mind, a well-filled purse, and a good digestion, it is sometimes difficult to fight off depression i...
-The Sleeping Of The Fields. Continued
And now Nature doctors the wound made by the leaf's fall. The broken ends of the bundles of fibres and vessels left at the scar are covered (in many trees) with a protecting gum, and a little later th...
-Chapter XVII. Martinmas Summer
Has time grown sleepy at his post And let the exiled summer back? Or is it her regretful ghost Or witchcraft of the almanac? - E. R. Sill. The still, sunny fall days are the serene old age of...
-Martinmas Summer. Continued
As for the young leaves, so rash and so forth-putting, Mother Nature recently tucked them up, all snug and safe, to sleep till spring. As this summer's foliage falls we begin to see myriad buds s...
-Chapter XVIII. In Winter Woods
The Night is Mother of the Day, The Winter of the Spring; And ever upon old Decay, The greenest mosses cling. Behind the cloud the starlight lurks, Through showers the sunbeams fall; For G...
-In Winter Woods. Continued
If it lies deep, the cracks in the bark are deep, and the ridges between them are high and rough, as they are on the oak. The beech, on the contrary, wears its cork-under-robe just beneath its oute...
-The Gentle Art Of Pleasing
By Elizabeth Glover. 16mo, cloth decorated, gilt top, $1.00. The author writes with genuine sympathy and insight into the minds and hearts of young people, and pleases while she teaches how to plea...
-Two Out-Of-Doors Books
With The Wild Flowers, From Pussy-Willow To Thistle-Down A rural chronicle of our flower friends and foes, describing them under their familiar English names. By E. M. Hardinge. 16mo, cloth, illust...









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previous page: Sub-Alpine Plants Or Flowers Of The Swiss Woods And Meadows | by H. Stuart Thompson
  
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