Family, Mint. Color, pink, crimson, or sometimes cream color. Calyx and corolla, a-lipped. The corolla seems to have no upper lip. It has 4 upper, nearly equal, small lobes like little ears or horns, while below a broad, concave lip projects. Stamens, 4, 2 being taller than the others. Pistil, 1. Fruit, 4 nutlets, from the center of which the style stands. The flowers, about 6 in a whorl, grow in terminal spikes, greenish buds above, pink flowers lower down, while often, lowest of all, scarious, withered corollas detract from the delicate beauty of the 6 to 12-inch-long spike. Leaves, serrate, lance-shape to ovate, sharply pointed at apex, short-petioled or sessile, opposite. Bracts accompany the flowers in the spike. 2 to 3 feet high. Plant covered with soft down. Stem, square. July to September.

Rich, low ground and wet meadows. New England to Nebraska and southward. I have found this pretty mint common on the shores of Greenwood Lake. New Jersey, and on the south shore, along the bay fronts, of Long Island. A var. littordle, with smaller flowers, stiff stem, lance-shaped leaves, whole plant very softly-downy, occurs near the coast from Maine to Florida. (See illustration, p. 288.)

American germander. wood sage. (Teucrium canadense)

American germander. wood sage. (Teucrium canadense)