Family, Orchis. Color, rose and a purplish pink. Leaf, 1, long, narrow, grass-like. Among our loveliest bog-orchids is the beautiful calopogon. A scape, bearing a single leaf, issuing from a sheathing base, produces a few rose-colored flowers, the lowest in bloom while the upper ones are still in bud. The lip appears above in the upper part of the flower, broadened at terminus, and bearded with white, yellow, and crimson hairs. This is the normal position of the lip. In most orchids it is brought under, to form an insect platform, by the twisting of the ovary. In this the ovary does not twist. The outer sepal, thus brought below, is large and broad, and forms, quite as well as the lip, a place for the visiting insect to stand upon. Root a bulb. June and July.

This is not a rare plant. Many swamps are crimsoned in spots by this striking and beautiful flower. It is worth one's while to leave the city for a June holiday in order to find the calopogon in one of its wet haunts. In wet meadows and bogs. Newfoundland to Minnesota and southward to Florida and Missouri. (See illustration, p. 249.)

Calopogon. Grass Pink. (Calopogon pulchellus)

Calopogon. Grass Pink. (Calopogon pulchellus)