Family, Composite. Color, pale magenta pink, tending to whitish. The flower bracts are purplish. Corollas, tubular, 5-toothed. Pappus, a row of hair-like bristles. Flowers, in dense, compound, flat-topped or pyramidal panicles with a straight, often purplish stem, marked with lines. Plant, 3 to 10 feet high. Leaves, in whorls of 3 to 6, thin, serrate, ovate or lanceolate, 4 to 12 inches long, about 3 inches wide. When in fruit the blooms become "fuzzy." August and September.

Not a handsome plant, but tall and showy, one of the autumn coarser flowers, found in lowlands or in moist woods or thickets. Named from a New England Indian doctor. New England to Florida. There are several varieties of this, differing mainly in the leaves. (See illustration, p. 295.)

Var. maculatum, called spotted boneset, has purple - spotted stems of lower growth than the last. Leaves, smaller, more finely toothed, 3 to 5 in a whorl, the upper, perhaps, opposite, thicker and rougher. Cyme of flowers flatter, and the flowers of a deeper crimson. Growing also in wet grounds with nearly the same range.

Joe Pye Weed. Trumpet Weed. (Eupatorium purpureum)

Joe Pye Weed. Trumpet Weed. (Eupatorium purpureum)