Lysimachia quadrifolia - Family, Primrose. Color, deep yellow, spotted or lined with red. Calyx, 5 or 6-parted. Corolla, wheel-shaped, deeply parted, axillary, on long, slender peduncles. Leaves, generally in whorls of fours, sessile, occasionally a pair opposite, with leaflets oblong to lance-shaped, pointed at apex, black-dotted, smooth. June to August.

The flowering stem presents a regular appearance. 4 leaves, rarely 5, or less, grow at even distances in whorls along the stem, and 2 or more star-shaped blossoms, small, on long, thread-like peduncles, spring from the leaf-axils. 1 to 2 feet high. Its symmetry and slight color make it pleasing. In moist or sandy soil, in thickets or along roadsides. New Brunswick to Minnesota, south to Georgia. (See illustration, p. 199.)

L, terrestris. - Color, yellow, with dark markings. Flowers, much like the last, but in their inflorescence they differ, being collected in long, terminal, bracted racemes. On slender pedicels, but shorter than the preceding. Fruit, a round pod. Leaves, opposite, long, narrow, broader at base, acute at apex, blackdotted. Stem, 1 to 2 feet high, straight, smooth, branched above, bearing numerous flowers in the terminal raceme. Tiny bulbs often occur in the leaf-axils. July to September.

Whorled loosestrife (Lysimachia quadrifolia)

Whorled loosestrife (Lysimachia quadrifolia)

The moneywort of our gardens, sometimes called yellow myrtle, belongs to this genus. It grows trailing on the ground, with roundish, bright-green leaves and yellow blossoms. It escapes from gardens and becomes wild in fence-corners and fields. A bright flower, of low meadows, swamps, and moist thickets. Newfoundland south to Georgia and Arkansas.