This group covers the plants belonging to N.O. Rosaceae, of the class Icosandria. At first sight the plants of this order, and those belonging to the buttercup family, might seem to belong to the same group. They are, however, easily distinguished. The rose family has (with one or two exceptions) the stamens attached to the petals or calyx, not to the receptacle. The fruits are usually pulpy and edible, scarcely one being poisonous. In the next group the stamens are on the receptacle, the fruits are dry, and the plants nearly all more or less poisonous. Omitting the fruit trees, such as the cherry, crab, medlar, and hawthorn, all the plants in this group have numerous pistils.

No.

Botanical Name.

Common Name.

Season.

Situation.

Structure and Habit.

145

Spiraea .

Meadowsweet

May-Aug.

Damp .

Sweet creamy blossoms, reaching 3 feet.

146

Geum

(Fig. 25)

Avens.

April-July

Hedges. .

Yellow, seeds like shepherd's crook.

147

Potentilla.

Cinquefoil

Mar.-Sept.

Various.

Yellow or white flowers, a dozen species.

148

Comarum.. .

Marsh C. . .

May-July

Bogs

Dingy purple, fruits dry, strawberry-like.

149

Fragaria .

Strawberry .

May-July

Hedges.

White flowers, fruit well known.

150

Rubus.

Bramble .

June-Aug.

Hedges.

Many kinds, yielding the blackberry.

151

Rosa .

Rose .

May-July

Hedges.

The different wild roses are numerous.

152

Agrimonia .

Agrimony.

June-July

Banks .

A second kind found in South of England.

153

Sanguisorba .

Burnet. . .

June-Aug.

Meadows .

Flowers in purple heads, few stamens, leaflets many.

154

Poterium .

Lesser B. . .

June-Aug.

Chalk . .

Leaflets many, stamens many, smaller than last.

155

Alchemilla .

Lady's Mantle

June-Sept.

Fields . .

Given in Group iii (20) because of few stamens.

Fig. 31.   Arum Spathe and Spadix. (P) Palisade to keep insects inside the flower.

Fig. 31. - Arum Spathe and Spadix. (P) Palisade to keep insects inside the flower.

(See Group xviii).