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Wild Flowers And How To Identify Them



An introduction to the British flora

TitleWild Flowers And How To Identify Them
AuthorHilderic Friend
PublisherRobert Culley
Year1910
Copyright1910, Robert Culley
AmazonWild Flowers And How To Identify Them

By Hilderic Friend Author Of 'The Flowers And Their Story,' 'Flowers And Flower Lore,' Etc., Etc.

-The Plan
As one may reach the heart of a city by many different roads, so the student may find his way into the heart of flower-craft in a variety of ways. Many plans have been adopted to make botany easy. In ...
-British Wild Flowers And How To Identify Them. I. The Flowers In Season
Every one has observed that when the spring arrives the flowers appear, and that they become fewer and fewer as winter advances. The best time to begin study is in the New Year, before the flowers bew...
-II. The Flowers In Situation
It is often easy to decide what a flower is by means of its habitat. Some plants can only live in water, others only by the seashore. It is always well to begin study near home, and as most of the you...
-III. The Structure And Habits Of Flowers
1. General Observations Flowers differ in many ways, and it is by observing their differences of form, colour, habit, and structure that we are able to arrange them in families and orders. If we look...
-III. The Structure And Habits Of Flowers. Continued
4. Fruits And Seeds We generally think of fruits as sweet and edible, while seeds are for sowing. That is not the true difference, but it will suffice for us at present. Fleshy fruits are found on ma...
-II. Spurges And Orchids
There are two groups of plants which are so peculiar in their structure that beginners maybe excused if they find it difficult to classify them. As they cannot very well be placed in any of the groups...
-IV. The Classification Of Flowers
Plants have been classified in various ways. Some writers have divided them into trees, shrubs, and herbs; others have arranged them according to the colour of the flowers, the shape of the fruit, or ...
-Group I. 2 Stamens, I Pistil. Diandria
No. Botanical Name. Common Name. Season. Situation. Structure and Habit. I Ligustrum Privet . June-July Hedges. . Shrub, evergreen, whi...
-Group II. 3 Stamens, 1 Pistil Or More. Triandria
This Group contains nearly all the different grasses, besides a few plants which belong to other natural orders. Crocus, Iris (Fig. 2c), and Ruscus are Monocotyledons (Group ix). ...
-Group III. 4 Stamens, I Pistil Or More. Tetrandria
No. Botanical Name. Common Name. Season. Situation. Structure and Habit. 10 Dipsacus . . . Teasel. . . Aug.-Sept. Wastes . Four feet; p...
-Group IV. 4 Stamens, 2 Long And 2 Short. Didynamia
I. Herbs with square stems, opposite leaves, flowers lip-shaped in whorls or cymes, four seeds or nutlets. N.O. Labiatae; exceptions: Lycopus (6) and Salvia (7). This order includes about 20 Br...
-Group V. 5 Stamens, Free (Not Having The Anthers United). Pentandria
This group includes the N.O. Boraginaceae (46-51), with about a dozen genera; N.O. Primulaceae (52-5), with about 10 genera; N.O. Campanulaceae (56-9), and a number of others. Chiefly herbs with grace...
-Group VI. 5 Stamens, Free, With 2 Pistils Or Stigmas
This group (Pentandria digynia) corresponds almost exactly with N.O. Umbelliferae. A large and difficult order, with some 40 genera in Great Britain. Flowers usually white, arranged in umbels. The fru...
-Group VII. 5 Stamens, Free, With 2 Pistils (75), 3 Pistils (76-8), 4 Pistils (79), Or 5 Pistils (80 2), Or Stigmas In Each Flower
No. Botanical Name. Common Name. Season Situation. Structure and Habit. 75 Gentiana . (Fig. 23) Gentian . Aug.-Sept....
-Group VIII. 5 Stamens Combined Into A Tube
This group is known by the name Syngenesia, and includes all plants with compound flowers, like the daisy and sunflower, of the N.O. Compositae. It is the largest order in the world, and the British g...
-Group IX. 6 Stamens, Equal, I Pistil (Except Meadow Saffron)
This group includes practically all the Monocoty-ledonous flowering plants, excepting the Orchids (see p. 35) and grasses. Many of the plants are bulbous. They are chiefly fleshy and showy. Many are r...
-Group X. 6 Stamens (4 Long And 2 Short), And 4 Petals
This class, Tetradynamia, includes all the plants known as Crucifers (N.O. Cruciferae), on account of the petals being arranged like a cross. There are many genera, including such valuable plants as t...
-Group XI. 8 Stamens, I To 4 Pistils. Octandria
It is made up chiefly of the willow-herbs and heaths, with the milkwort. No. Botanical Name. Common Name. Season. Situation. Structure and Habit. 108 Oeno...
-Group XII. 9 Stamens
There are four plants in our islands which have nine as the normal number of stamens, and so form the Class Enneandria. No. Botanical Name. Common Name. Season. Situation. ...
-Group XIII. 10 Stamens. Pistils I (117-20), 2 (121-4), 3 (125-6), Or 5 (127-30). Flowers Regular, Usually Of 5 Petals, Except 119-20, 130, In Which They Are Bell-Shaped
This group includes N.O. Caryo-phyllaceae, and forms the class Decandria. No. Botanical Name. Common Name. Season. Situation. Structure and Habit. 117 Mon...
-Group XIV. 10 Stamens, 5 Pistils
N.O. Geraniaceae, forming the class Monadelphia, in which the bases of the stamens are united. There are 5 petals, and the stamens are in two sets of 5, one set being in some cases suppressed (as in E...
-Group XV. 10 Stamens, With Butterfly-Shaped Blossoms, Such As The Pea, Bean, Clovers, And Vetches, Of N.O. Leguminosae
There are only two plants, fumitory and milkwort, which can be confused with the legumes or butterfly flowers, and they have not 10 stamens. This group forms the class Diadelphia, and contains about 2...
-Group XVI. 10 To 20 Stamens
There are a few plants which have an uncertain number of stamens, which constitute the class Dodecandria. Three are trees; one is the houseleek, which is hardly wild, and two (Asarum and Hornwort) are...
-Group XVII. 20 Stamens, More Or Less
This group covers the plants belonging to N.O. Rosaceae, of the class Icosandria. At first sight the plants of this order, and those belonging to the buttercup family, might seem to belong to the same...
-Group XVIII. 20 Stamens Or More
20 stamens or more, situated on the receptacle, as can be proved by carefully removing the sepals and petals. Most of the plants are poisonous, hence this point must be specially noticed to distinguis...









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previous page: Wayside And Woodland Blossoms | by Edward Step
  
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next page: Wild Flowers Every Child Should Know | by Frederic William Stack