13. Crataegus Collina Chapman. Chapman's Hill Thorn

Fig. 2347

Crataegus collina Chapm. Fl. So. U. S. Ed. 2, suppl. 2.

684. 1892. C. Lettermani Sarg. Bot. Gaz. 31: 220. April 1901. C. sordida Sarg. Bot. Gaz. 33: 114. Feb. 1902.

A tree, sometimes 25o high, with spreading branches and a flat-topped crown. Spines numerous, 1'-2 1/2' long; leaves obovate or oblanceolate to oval, acute or obtuse at the apex, strongly cuneate, serrate or doubly serrate with obtuse lobes toward the apex, nearly entire below, 3/4'-2 1/4' long, 1/2'-2' wide, subcoriaceous, yellow-green, somewhat pubescent when young; corymbs and calyx pubescent; flowers 7"-12" broad; stamens 10-20 (commonly 20), the anthers usually yellow; styles and nutlets 4 or 5; calyx-lobes glandular-ciliate or glandular-serrate; fruit globose or compressed-globose, 5"-7" thick, red or orange-red; calyx-tube somewhat prominent, the lobes reflexed.

Virginia to Georgia, Missouri and Mississippi. April-May; fruit ripe October.

13 Crataegus Collina Chapman Chapman s Hill Thorn 689

14. Crataegus Succulénta Schrader. Long-Spined Thorn

Fig. 2348

C. succulenta Schrad.; Link, Handb. 3: 78. 1831. Crataegus glandulosa var. macracantha Lindl. Bot. Reg.

22: pl. 1912. 1836. Crataegus macracantha var. minor Lodd.; Loud. Arb.

Brit. 2:819. 1838. Crataegus occidentalis Britton, Bull. N. Y. Bot. Gard. 1:

5: 448. 1900. Crataegus coloradensis A. Nelson, Proc. Biol. Soc.

Wash. 17: 175. 1904.

A small tree, sometimes 25o high, with ascending branches and a broad irregular crown. Spines numerous, 1 1/2'-4' long; leaves rhombic-ovate to obovate, 1 1/4'-3 1/4' long, \'-2\' wide, acute at the apex, broadly cuneate at the base, serrate or doubly serrate with fine teeth, often lobed towards the apex, coriaceous, dark shining green above, pubescent along the veins beneath; corymbs slightly villous; flowers about 10" broad; calyx-lobes lanceolate, acuminate, glandu-lar-laciniate, villous; stamens 10-20, usually 10. the anthers large, pink or occasionally yellow; styles and nutlets usually 2 or 3; fruit subglobose, 3"-8" thick, dark red, shining, villous; calyx-lobes reflexed; flesh thin, glutinous.

Nova Scotia to Minnesota, North Carolina and Nebraska, and in the Rocky Mountains to southern Colorado. May; fruit ripe September.

14 Crataegus Succul Nta Schrader Long Spined Thorn 690

15. Crataegus Neofluviàlis Ashe. New River Thorn

Fig. 2349

Crataegus neofluvialis Ashe, Journ. E. Mitch. Soc. 16:

71. Feb. 1900. Crataegus michiganensis Ashe, Bull. N. Car. Agric. Coll.

175: 111. Aug. 1900. C. gemmosa Sarg. Bot. Gaz. 33: 119. 1902. C. pisifera Sarg. Rhodora 7: 163. 1905.

A tree, sometimes 30° high, with ascending and spreading branches, and numerous spines 1' - 3 long. Leaves elliptic-ovate to obdvate, 1-3' long, 3/4'-2 1/2' wide, acute or obtuse at the apex, cuneate at base, sharply and doubly serrate with obtuse or acute lobes towards the apex, coriaceous, dark green and shining above, pubescent along the veins beneath; corymbs and calyx-tube glabrous or slightly villous; flowers 6"-8" broad, calyx-lobes more villous inside, glandular-laciniate; stamens 15-20; anthers usually pink, small; styles and nutlets usually 2 or 3; fruit globose or short-ellipsoid, dark red, 3"-6" thick, glabrous or slightly hairy; calyx-lobes reflexed; flesh thin, glutinous.

Western Vermont to eastern Wisconsin, North Carolina and Iowa. May; fruit ripe September.

15 Crataegus Neofluvi Lis Ashe New River Thorn 691