Twining, the branches glabrous. Leaves: chartaceous-margined, not ciliate, only the upper pair connate-perfoliate. Flowers: verticillate in a short, terminal, interrupted spike; corolla yellow changing to red, the tube strongly gibbous at the base, the two-lipped limb shorter than the tube; stamens and style exserted.

A climbing vine, with pairs of smooth leaves covered with a delicate bloom, growing along its branches, only the upper ones joined together round the stem, which bears at its apex a cluster of red and gold flowers. These blossoms are trumpet-shaped, and the five stamens and style project beyond the corolla, which is vermilion outside and yellow within. The berry is soft and juicy. Sometimes this vine is called Woodbine, and Shakespeare in his exquisite romance of A Midsummer Night's Dream refers to this fact when he makes Queen Titania say to Bottom the Weaver, with whom the Fairy King Oberon has caused her by means of a love philter to fall in love: " Sleep thou, and I will wind thee in my arms. So doth the woodbine the sweet honeysuckle Gently entwist."

Milton in Lycidas speaks of "the well-attir'd woodbine," and truly, for no "gadding vine " was ever graced with finer or more fragrant flowers.

Spenser calls it by the older name of Caprifole, or Goat-leaf, because, like the mountain goat, it climbs over almost inaccessible crags; the French and Italian names are also similar, being respectively Chevre-feuille and Caprifoglio.

Northern Twin Flower (Linnaea borealis var. americana)

Northern Twin Flower (Linnaea borealis var. americana)