Achillea Macrophylla L. (Plate VI)

Stem 2-3 feet high, erect, terete, leafy. Leaves pinnatifid, large, deeply and much divided; the lower leaves ovate-triangular in outline, pinnatipartite, with 3-7 segments, the inferior segments being distinct, the upper confluent, sharply toothed; uppermost leaves narrow, lanceolate, not divided, but sharply toothed. Corymbs very compound. Flowers white, small.

Woods and shady places in the Alps and sub-Alps; 3000-6800 feet.

Distribution

Eastern, Central, and Western Alps; local.

A useful subject for planting in the shade of trees at the back of a rockery, for the foliage is rather handsome.

Chrysanthemum L

Capitula solitary, often large. Ray-florets ligulate, white or yellow; disk-florets tubular, perfect, yellow. Receptacle flat or convex, naked. Involucral bracts imbricate, with scarious margins. Fruit of ray-flowers ribbed or winged, of disk-flowers compressed. Leaves toothed or cut. A genus sometimes divided into several small genera.

Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum L. Ox-Eye Daisy. (Plate XXI)

Stems erect, simple, or slightly branched above. Root-leaves obovate and coarsely toothed, on long stalks; stem-leaves narrow, sessile, with fewer teeth. Flower-heads solitary, very large, especially in the Alps, on long, terminal peduncles. Involucral bracts bordered with a brown, scaly edge.

Pastures, banks, and mountain slopes from the plains up to 7000 and rarely 8000 feet. June to August.

Distribution

Europe, Russian Asia. Britain.

Chrysanthemum Alpinum L. (Plate XXI)

The figure depicts a rather small-flowered specimen. Stem 2-6 inches high, with a single capitulum. Leaves mostly radical, stalked, spathulate, pinnatifid, with 5-7 segments, toothed, the uppermost linear, entire. Flower-heads about 1 1/2 inch across, white, disk yellow.

1. CHRYSANTHKMUM LEUCANTHEMUM. 2. CALAMINTHA ALPINA. 3. CHRYSANTHEMUM AUPINUM. 4. BELLI DIASTRUM MICHELII. 5. LUZULA LUTEA.

Plate XXI.

1. CHRYSANTHKMUM LEUCANTHEMUM.

2. CALAMINTHA ALPINA.

3. CHRYSANTHEMUM AUPINUM.

4. BELLI DIASTRUM MICHELII.

5. LUZULA LUTEA.

4/7 NATURAL SIZE.

Pastures and debris on the Alps, particularly on siliceous rocks. July, August; 5000-12,000 feet.

Distribution

Carpathians, Eastern, Central, and Western Alps, Pyrenees, Transylvania.

Easily grown in a well-drained, southerly position, in a compost of sand and loam. It should be top-dressed each spring.

Doronicum L

Root-leaves stalked or o; stem-leaves amplexicaul. Capitula solitary or in corymbs, rayed. Ray-flowers ligulate, usually female; disk-flowers with free branches of style; receptacle conicle. Fruit furrowed. Pappus-hairs rigid.

The nomenclature of the Alpine species of Doronicum (or Aroni-cum) appears much confused.

Doronicum Pardalianches L. Leopard's-Bane

Root-stock often woolly at the crown. Root-leaves broadly ovate and deeply cordate at the base. Stem about 2 feet high, with few ovate-lanceolate leaves, the lower ones broader, stalked and embracing the stem in a broadly dilated base. Flower-heads 2-5 on long peduncles; handsome. Yellow ray-lfrorets numerous and narrow.

Woods and mountain pastures. May, June.

Distribution

Rare in Switzerland. Jura, Vosges, Cevennes, Pyrenees, Central and Northern France, Spain, Italy, Central Europe. British.