Digitalis L. Foxglove

Flowers in long terminal racemes, large, purple or yellow, rarely white. Corolla campanulate or ventricose, with bearded throat. Stigma 2-lobed. Capsule oval-acuminate, with 2 cells.

About 18 species inhabiting Europe, S. Africa, and Central and Western Asia.

Digitalis Grandiflora All. (D. Ambigua L.). (Plate XXVII)

2-3 feet high. Leaves oblong-lanceolate, serrulate, ciliate. Corolla broadly campanulate, large, glandular - pubescent, dull yellow or yellow-ochre, with brown veins within. Sepals lanceolate, acute.

Woods and bushy, rocky places in the Alps and sub-Alps. June to September. Very common on the limestone about Engelberg.

Distribution

Alps, Pyrenees, Jura, Ardennes, Vosges. Europe from Belgium and Spain to Russia and West Siberia.

Digitalis Lutea L. (Plate XXVII)

1-3 feet high, usually glabrous. Leaves lanceolate, shining, glabrous on both sides, finely serrated, the lower ones shortly petioled; upper leaves sessile and rounded at the base. Flowers pale lemon-yellow, neither veined nor spotted, in a long, compact, tapering, unilateral raceme. Flowers much smaller than the last. Calyx-lobes linear-lanceolate. Capsule ovoid, conic, glabrescent.

Woods and bushy, stony places in sub-alpine districts; common. June to August.

Distribution

Central Europe, from Belgium and Spain to Hungary and Galicia; Morocco. The Purple Foxglove (D. purpurea L.) does not grow in Switzerland or in the Jura, though widely spread through France, and it reappears in Corsica and Sardinia.

1. MULGEDIUM ALPINUM. 2. DIGITALIS AMBIGUA. 3. DIGITALIS LUTEA.

Plate XXVII.

1. MULGEDIUM ALPINUM.

2. DIGITALIS AMBIGUA.

3. DIGITALIS LUTEA.

4/7 NATURAL SIZE.

Tozzia L. Tozzia Alpina L

Rootstock covered with succulent, imbricate scales, with thick fibres among them, forming an ovoid, compact body. Stem erect or ascending, succulent, quadrangular, with short hairs on the angles, with opposite branches from the middle, and a pair of leaves at the axils of each pair of branches. Leaves ovate, acute or obtuse, sessile, glabrous, coarsely serrate or entire. Flowers opposite in the axils of the upper leaves, shortly stalked, forming short, loose, leafy racemes at the summit of the branches; flower-stalk downy, recurved when the fruit is ripe. Corolla yellow, with red spots on lower lip. Perhaps semi-parasitic.

Moist, stony, shady places in limestone woods and among debris in the Alps and sub-Alps; local. June to August.

Distribution

Carpathians, Silesian Mountains; Eastern, Central, and Western Alps, Jura, Pyrenees.

Bartsia L. Bartsia Alpina L. (Plate XXII)

Rhizome branching, many-stemmed. Stem simple, erect, or ascending, purplish brown, with glandular hairs, 2-8 inches high, quadrangular, scaly at the base. Leaves opposite, ovate, some-'what amplexicaul, bluntly serrate, wrinkled, covered with short hairs; upper leaves violet. Flowers solitary in the axils of the upper leaves, shortly stalked, dark violet-red, covered with glandular hairs. Anthers bearded. Calyx hairy. Becomes black on drying.

Fresh, grassy places in the Alps and sub-Alps, extending upwards to 8800 feet. July, August.

Distribution

Carpathians, Sudetic Mountains, Eastern, Central, and Western Alps, Jura, Vosges, Black Forest, Pyrenees. All mountainous Europe, and as far as Arctic Russia and Siberia. British.