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Some Wild Flowers Of Tasmania | by Leonard Rodway



The object of this book is to excite an interest in plants by affording an easy means of studying the structures and affinities of some of our commonest native flowers. In all instances the student should verify the details by dissection of the flowers described. In order to broaden the view some general features dealing with plant life have been touched upon, and where thought desirable repetition has been indulged in.

TitleSome Wild Flowers Of Tasmania
AuthorLeonard Rodway
PublisherJohn Vail
Year1922
Copyright1922, John Vail
AmazonSome Wild Flowers Of Tasmania

By L. Rodway, Government Botanist

Illustrations from Photographs by Olive Barnard

(Second Edition)

Some Wild Flowers Of Tasmania 1
-Preface To First Edition
The object of this book is to excite an interest in plants by affording an easy means of studying the structures and affinities of some of our commonest native flowers. In all instances the student sh...
-Nomenclature Of Flowers
Popular Names. Scientific Names. Ant Orchid . . . . Chiloglottis species Ants' Delight . . . . Acrotriche verrulata Bauera . . . . Bauera rubioides...
-Chapter I. The Flower
The name flower is a popular one. We know well enough what we mean when we use it, though it might be difficult for us to define. We know it as the first stage of the process by which the plant prod...
-Chapter II. The Ranunculus Family
The number of different species of flowering plants upon the earth is very great indeed, but a careful examination of all the different forms shows us they can be grouped into a few natural families. ...
-The Ranunculus Family. Continued
Clematis, though so different in habit, has a flower of very similar construction. In most cases Clematis is a tail climber, clinging to any available support by means of the leaf stalks. These stalks...
-Chapter III. The Heath Family
This family as originally understood is a very large one, and plants belonging to it are found in most parts of the world. The species are varied in detail, just as its distribution is worldwide, and ...
-The Heath Family. Continued
We have a shrub very common in our bush of a similar appearance to a small-leaved Richea, but the petals are persistent and are separate one from the other nearly to the base, and the anthers generall...
-Chapter IV. Peaflowers
This is a large and very natural family. In order to illustrate its features we will examine one of our commonest bush flowers, Prickly Beauty. This flower is fortunate in having an original popular ...
-Peaflowers. Continued
Peaflowers appear to be especially constructed to make use of the visits of large insects, such as bees, for purposes of cross-fertilisation. In the centre of the flower, around the base, of the pisti...
-Chapter V. The Mimosa Family
This family is closely related to the Peaflowers, so much so that the two are commonly linked together. The fruit and seed are alike, but the flowers differ. In Tasmania we have many species, but they...
-Chapter VI. The Rose Family
This family is a large and important one, not only from the interest it bears for the student, but on account of the beautiful flowers and useful fruits produced by some of its members. Its natural ho...
-Chapter VII. The Myrtle Family
The Myrtles form by far the most conspicuous feature of Tasmanian woodlands. Eucalypts, Bottlebrushes, and Teatrees are the commonest genera, while the pretty little Baeckias and Native Broom assist i...
-Chapter VIII. Eucalypts
The most striking feature in an Australian landscape is the Gumtree. It is the typical tree of Australia, and makes up the bulk of our forests. There are about a hundred and fifty species, comprising ...
-Eucalypts. Continued
Most Gums take time in maturing their flowers. From the first appearance of the bud to the bursting of the lid in Blue-gum generally takes two years; also, except those growing at a high altitude, the...
-Chapter IX. Purple Heather. Also Blue Love
The two plants that give their names to this chapter have no superficial resemblance but for all that they belong to closely-allied families. Purple Heather, popularly so called, is never purple, or h...
-Chapter X. Boronia
The genus Boronia contains about sixty species, but they are all confined to Australia, though within the limits of the Commonwealth they are very widely dispersed. It belongs to the family Rutaceae, ...
-Chapter XI. The Saxifrage Family
Flowers of this family are not common in most parts of Tasmania, but our forms are too interesting to allow us to neglect hem. The family is a large one, and found almost throughout the world, but tho...
-The Saxifrage Family. Continued
Bauera, also called Native Rose, is, when commonly met with, a pretty little trailing shrub with slender wiry stems, often supporting itself amongst the undergrowth, but under favourable conditions it...
-Chapter XII. The Protea Family
This family is a large one, and though containing great variation in its flowers, they all conform to one type. This so clearly marks it off from all others that there is never a doubt as to whether a...
-The Protea Family. Continued
Hakea is, from the shape of its fruit, often called Native Pear, but as this name is also given to two or three other shrubs we may be excused for dropping it in this instance. We have no less than se...
-Chapter XIII. The Composite Family
The object of the beautiful colour of flowers is to render them conspicuous amongst the foliage in order that birds or insects may see them from a distance and be attracted. We call them beautiful bec...
-Chapter XIV. Sheoke And Beech
A most fascinating tree is Sheoke; so also is Buloke. Sombre in appearance and slow of growth, but full of interest to the student. They were commonly called She-oak and Bull-oak respectively, but as ...
-Chapter XV. Lopsided Flowers And Some Others
A stranger who knows something of flowers is generally struck with the number of shrubs and herbs in our bush, whose flowers are so irregular that they may be called lopsided. Perhaps the most interes...
-Chapter XVI. Lily And Iris
We have used the name flowering plant in a restricted sense to save us using a scientific word. We mean by it all those seed-bearing plants that do not belong to the Coniferous or Pine family. They ...
-Chapter XVII. The Orchid Family
This family is the wonder and admiration of all who take an interest in flowers. It attains its finest development in the tropics, where the common habit is to grow on the trunks and branches of trees...
-The Orchid Family. Continued
Another common genus is Thelymitra, which has such regular flowers that the common form is often called Native Hyacinth. This is a handsome plant, sometimes 2 feet high, with numerous rather large flo...
-Chapter XVIII. Carnivorous Plants And Parasites
A typical plant, is green in colour, and it is so because it possesses a quantity of a peculiar substance called plant-green, or chlorophyll. This substance contains a minute quantity of magnesium. By...
-Chapter XIX. The Non-Florals
There are a great many plants which have no flowers or only very primitive ones, and therefore do not exactly come within the scope of this work, still they deserve some slight record. ([The Pine fami...
-Chapter XX. The Spore And The Cell
There is one peculiarity appertaining to matters referring to living things, namely an impossibility to construct a perfect definition. For instance, taking the word spore, we use it freely, and under...
-Chapter XXI. The Herbarium
A student who takes any interest in the study of plants is certain to make some sort of a collection of dried specimens. He may just as well make a creditable collection while he is about it, and save...









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previous page: Illinois Wild Flowers | by John Voss, Virginia S. Eifert
  
page up: Flora, Herb, Mushroom and Plant Books
  
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