Named in honor of Governor DeWitt Clinton of New York.

Perennial. In moist woods and thickets, especially in evergreen woods. Newfoundland, Ontario, and Minnesota, south to North Carolina and Wisconsin. Rare in northern Ohio. May, June.

Rootstock

Slender.

Scape

Six to sixteen inches high, rising from a group of broad, petioled, sheathing, basal leaves, and bearing two to six flowers.

Leaves

Two to five, clustered, broad, oblong or obovate, parallel-veined, thin, dark, glossy, acute or acuminate at apex, sheathing at the base.

Flowers

Small lilies, pale yellow, greenish on the outside, less than an inch long, three to six, nodding on slender pedicels from the summit of a leafless scape.

Perianth

Six sepal-petals, alike and not distinguishable.

Stamens

Six, slightly attached to the petals.

Pistil

Ovary two-celled; style slender.

Fruit

Oval blue berries, on upright stems.

Take for example the Clintonia, solitary amidst fallen spruce logs on the mountain slope. Imagine it transferred to a trim garden! If you have really seen that flower of the solitudes, you have seen the mossy rock overhanging it, the spruce cones lying thick about, sniffed the balsam, and heard the veery on the mountain. - KlRKHAM.

Noticeably a lily, the handsome shining leaves and clustered, pale lemon-yellow flowers of Clintonia abound in the cool woods of the north. When one has failed to find it in the spring, its cluster of two to four parallel-veined leaves surrounding a stem bearing three to four blue balls, make it noticeable and attractive in midsummer.

The slender flowering stalk rises from six to fifteen inches high and bears from three to six nodding, greenish yellow, small lilies, arranged in a loose terminal cluster. Three sepals and three petals, all alike, six stamens, and a pistil complete the floral outfit.

Though the flowers nod, the large berries stand erect, and as they begin to ripen they turn a beautiful blue which darkens as they grow older.

The plant was named in honor of DeWitt Clinton, governor of New York, who, besides being a man of affairs, was an enthusiastic amateur botanist.

Yellow Clintonia. Clintonia borealis

Yellow Clintonia. Clintonia borealis