Broad, white patches of this very common Everlasting carpet dry fields and hillside pastures almost everywhere during the early spring. It seems to come out of the ground with the frost and is the earliest of its kind to appear. It spreads its leafy tufts by runners, and the leafy, woolly stalk sprawls along the ground. The flowering stems grow from six to eighteen inches in height. The basal leaves are paddle-shaped, or broadly oval, and sometimes smooth. They have short stems and are distinctly three-ribbed. They are dark green above and silvery beneath. The upper leaves are oblong or lance-shaped, and stemless and usually small and distant. The numerous tubular flowers are set in their little pale green cups and are crowded into small terminal heads. They are of two kinds, pistillate and staminate, and occur on separate plants, often in distinct patches. The former appear like miniature inverted, silvery white tassels of silk, and the latter, on smaller plants, are more disc-like and creamy white with brownish, orange-tipped stamens. They are found from April to June in dry soil in rocky fields and open woods, from Texas and Florida to Nebraska and Labrador.