The funny, fuzzy heads of the Pussy Plant are often carelessly passed and unnoticed with the mistaken idea that they are merely the faded and bleached remains of some perished blossom. And if you are not careful to investigate these hoary top-knots when you first find them, you are likely to fall into the same error. Most people fail to identify this species as a member of the Clover tribe at sight, notwithstanding there is no getting away from its trifoliate leaf. The generic name, Trifoliuni, is derived from the Latin tres, three, and folium, a leaf, and alludes to the three-parted compound leaf, which is characteristic of this family. The name Clover is thought to have been derived from the Latin clava, meaning clubs, in connection with the mythical three-headed club of the mighty Hercules, which the Clover leaf is supposed to resemble. The so-called clubs on playing cards are believed to have originated from the Clover leaf. The Rabbit-foot Clover is an immigrant from Europe. The name comes from the fancied resemblance of the furry flower, to that popular token of good luck, the foot of a rabbit. The annual, slender, erect stalk is much branched and covered with minute silky hairs. It grows from six to eighteen inches in height and every branching joint of stalk and stem is sheathed with a stipule having a pair of long, curving, needle-like points. The three small, thin, velvety leaflets forming the compound leaf flare from the tip of a short, slender stem. They are long and very narrow, lance-shaped, the broader part toward the rather blunt three-pointed apex, and they taper into short stems at the base. The length is less than an inch. The midrib is noticeable the entire length, and finally forms the centre one of the three tiny tips at the apex. The margins and veinings are very similar to those of the Yellow Clover. The sweetly scented flowering heads usually occur in terminal pairs. They are oblong or cylindrical in shape, and the general colour is a beautiful pearl-gray tinted with pink. They are composed of numerous florets densely arranged in the exceedingly thick and downy plume which varies from one-quarter to an inch or so in length. The greenish-white corolla of the tiny floret is much shorter than the little green calyx, which extends its five remarkably long, feathery pink tips out of all reasonable proportion, to form the silky heads. The Stone Clover is a native of northern Asia. It blossoms from May to September and is more or less common east of the Mississippi.