It is exceedingly interesting to ponder over the unlimited resources of Nature, which enable her to rise to any emergency. The Audubon Society will tell you that a horrible famine might result if it were not for the birds that hold in check untold hoards of insects. But it is easy for an observer in botany to conjecture that if this task of extermination had not been successfully maintained by the birds, the same economic condition would have been developed in certain plants. And while we listen to reports of decreasing bird life, it is well to consider that there is also a corresponding increase in plant life. While certain birds are really becoming rare or even extinct, so are certain flowers. On the other hand, certain birds are increasing, and even so are certain flowers. So we find an active working force with an assisting support and an unlimited reserve always available. The latter includes certain fungi that attack and overcome swarms of insects besides the real catch-them-alive plants like the Venus Flytrap, Pitcher Plant, Dogbane, Catchfly, and the Sundew. The last is a small flowered species having a smooth, red, slender flowering stalk, rising from four to ten inches high from a low spreading rosette of the most curious leaves. This remarkable, small, circular green leaf is suddenly narrowed into a short, flat, hairy stem. The upper surface is slightly hollowed, and is covered with irregular, fine, reddish hairs, which exude a colourless, sticky fluid from their tips, that sparkles like dew drops. These transparent, glittering drops are peculiar to the Sundews and seem to attract tiny passing insects which, alighting on the leaf, immediately become stuck in the gummy substance. Then the slowly curling hairs hopelessly entangle their struggling prisoner, and finally the leaf, closing inward, enfolds its victim and ends its life. At this stage the leaf literally digests its prey with the aid of a new flow of a peptic liquid not unlike gastric juice in the stomach of animals. A dozen or less tiny white flowers are borne along one side of the drooping, terminal end of the stalk. They open only in the sunshine and but one or two at a time. This is a rather inconspicuous little plant and is likely to be overlooked. It has a very short rootstock and yields a purple stain to paper. It is found commonly during June, July and August in bogs or wet, sandy ground from Labrador to Alaska, south to Florida and Alabama, and in the Sierra Nevadas to Montana and California.