The pert, nodding flowers of this handsome perennial decorate the moist cliffs and ridges in open woodlands, and also the prairies, during April and May, from Pennsylvania to Georgia, and west to Manitoba and Texas. The flowering stalk rises one or two feet high from a basal cluster of pointed oblong leaves, which taper into narrow, winged stems. The rootstock is stout and fibrous. Several showy, purplish pink or white flowers are gathered into a loose terminal arrangement. These hang from slender, curving stems which spring from the tip of the stalk. The five, long, narrow lobes of the corolla are bent sharply backward toward the stem, exposing five yellow-capped stamens, which are closely united, forming a cone, and a very long, thread-like pistil. The short tube of the flower is thickened at the throat, and marked with dark, purplish dots.

SHOOTING STAR. AMERICAN COWSLIP. Dodecatheon Meadia

SHOOTING STAR. AMERICAN COWSLIP. Dodecatheon Meadia.