Anemophilous (p. 9) plants are those in which the pollen is carried to the stigma by the wind. Anther, that portion of the stamen which contains the pollen.

Calyx (p. 27), the outer whorl of the flower.

Cleistogamous species (p. 37), are those which, besides the usual conspicuous flowers, have others which are smaller, and generally uncoloured.

Corolla (p. 27), the second whorl of the flower. In most cases this is the coloured part.

Dichogamous species (p. 28) are those in which the stamens and pistil do not mature simultaneously. Diclinous plants (p. 28), are those in which all the flowers are either male or female, that is to say, either contain stamens but no pistil, or pistil but no stamens. Dimorphous species (p. 29) are those in which there are two forms of flowers, differing in the relative position or length of the anthers and stigma. Dioecious species (p. 28) are those in which the stamens and pistils are situated not only in distinct flowers, but also on separate plants.

Entomophilous plants (p. 9) are those in which the pollen is carried to the stigma by insects Epigynous, situated upon the ovary.

Filament, the stalk of the anther.

Heterogamous plants are those which have male, female, and hermaphrodite flowers, or any two of them united in one head.

Heteromorphous species are those in which there is more than one form of flower. Hypogynous, situated under the ovary.

Monoecious species (p. 28) are those in which the stamens and pistils are in separate flowers, but on the same plant. Monomorphous species are those in which all the flowers resemble one another in the relative position of the stamens and pistil.

Nectary, that part of the flower which secretes honey.

Perigynous, situated around the ovary.

Petals, the leaves of the corolla.

Pistil, the central organ of the flower. It generally consists of one or more ovaries and stigmas; the stigma is often raised on a stalk, called a "style."

Polygamous species are those which have male, female, and hermaphrodite flowers on the same or on distinct plants.

Proterandrous plants (p. 28) are those in which the stamens come to maturity before the pistil.

Proterogynous plants (p. 28) are those in which the pistil comes to maturity before the stamens.

Sepals (p. 27) the leaves of the calyx.

Stamens (p. 27) the parts of a flower which generally stand next the corolla, on the inner side. They usually consist of a stalk or filament, and an "anther" containing the pollen. Stigma (p. 27), that portion of the pistil in which pollen must be deposited in order to fertilise the flowers. Style, the stalk of the stigma.

Trimorphous species are those in which there are three forms of flowers, differing in the relative position or length of the anthers and stigma.

Geranium Sylvaticum.

Geranium Sylvaticum.