Stems erect or nearly so, smooth, perennial by slender rootstocks and forming dense tufts. Lower and basal leaves spatulate or oblanceolate, about one-half of an inch long or less, sometimes slightly hairy, narrowed into petioles. Flowers solitary on very slender terminal and axillary stalks. Corolla one-fourth to one-third of an inch long, and as broad or broader when expanded, the tube pale yellow and slightly enlarged above, the limb of the corolla nearly flat when expanded with four oblong or elliptic, slightly pointed lobes, light blue or violet in color, the throat of the corolla yellow, surrounded by a narrow white band. Calyx deeply four-parted with oblong, blunt lobes, the lobes separated from one another by about their width. Fruit a small capsule about one-sixth of an inch broad and broader than long, compressed and divided or deeply notched at the summit, shorter than the calyx.

Memoir 15 N. Y. State Museum

Plate 209

b. bluets; innocence; eyebright Houstonia coerulea

b. bluets; innocence; eyebright Houstonia coerulea

In open grassy places, on wet rocks or in open, rocky woods, Nova Scotia to Quebec, New York and Michigan, south to Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Missouri. It is inclined to be somewhat local in distribution, but when found is apt to be present in great abundance. Flowering from April to July, usually at its best in New York during the latter part of May, and usually producing a few flowers through the summer.