117. Poppy, Corn-Rose, Papaver Rhoeas, Poppy family. Stem 1 to 2 ft. high, rough with hairs: the leaves are oval and deeply feather-divided into notched segments: the flowers are large, with 4 scarlet petals, the bases of which are black: the seed-vessel is roundish and smooth: common in corn-fields, flowering in summer. P. Argemone, the Prickly-headed Poppy, is also fairly common: it has smaller, paler flowers, and long seed-vessels, covered with stiff hairs.

117. Poppy, Corn Rose.

117. Poppy, Corn-Rose.

118. Purple Clover.

118. Purple Clover.

118. Purple Clover, Trifolium pratense, Vetch family. The stem is prostrate at the base, and then rises to a height of about 1 ft., bearing dense, oval heads of many, deep crimson, almost purple flowers: the leaves are compound, with 3 oval leaflets, and are provided with stipules: common in fields and pastures, and very frequently cultivated as a fodder plant: flowers throughout summer.

119. Marsh Cinquefoil, Potentilla palustris, Rose family. A common marsh plant: the stem rises from the water: the leaves are feather-compound with 5 to 7 elliptical, serrate leaflets, and have stipules: the flowers are large, occurring in small groups at the tip of the stem, and are deep crimson-brown, or with a purple tinge, in colour: flowers in August.

120. Scarlet Pimpernel, Poor Man's Weather-Glass, Ana-gallis arvensis, Primrose family. The stem is branched, lying along the ground, and rising at the tips: the leaves are in pairs, sessile, and ovate in shape: the flowers arise singly on slender stalks from the leaf axils; they are small, star-like, and bright scarlet: a weed of dry, sandy soil, flowering in summer: this pretty little plant owes its second English name to the fact that the flowers close up in damp weather.

119. Marsh Cinquefoil.

119. Marsh Cinquefoil.

120. Scarlet Pimpernel, Poor Man's Weather Glass.

120. Scarlet Pimpernel, Poor Man's Weather-Glass.

121. Sheep's Sorrel, Rumex Aceto-sella, Dock family. A weed, the occurrence of which in abundance is a sure indication of poor soil: it is readily recognised by its leaves, which are smooth, bright green,and halbert-shaped: the flowers are small and inconspicuous, but gathered in a branched spike at the end of the stem (9 ins. high) they make a bright show of crimson variegated with green. R. Acetosa, the Sorrel, or Sotirock, has arrow-shaped leaves of a pleasant acid flavour much appreciated by children.

121. Sheep's Sorrel.

121. Sheep's Sorrel.