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Household Companion: The Model CookBook



This is a complete guide in all the duties of the kitchen, containing general instructions on the care of the fire and cooking. It also tells how to prepare all the different classes of dishes, such as soups, fish, poultry, meats, eggs, vegetables, sauces, breads, cakes and desserts, so that the most inexperienced can provide appetizing food, and the best housekeeper can find very many helpful hints.

TitleHousehold Companion: The Model Cook Book
AuthorAlice A. Johnson, Mrs. Janet McKenzie Hill, Dr. Henry HartShorne
PublisherM.L. Dewsnap
Year1909
Copyright1909

A Practical Reference Work For Housekeepers

Household Companion

---------Comprising--------

A Complete Cook Book—Practical Household Recipes, Aids And Hints For Household Decorations; The Care Of Domestic Plants And Animals And A Treatise On Domestic Medicine

Including a Chapter on TUBERCULOSIS The Great White Plague A CURABLE AND PREVENTABLE DISEASE

—By—

Dr. Lawrence F. Flick

Medical Director of the Henry Phipps Institute for the Study, Treatment and Prevention of Tuberculosis

General Editors Of The Work:

  • Alice A. Johnson -- Graduate in Domestic Science of Drexel Institute, Philadelphia
  • Mrs. Janet McKenzie Hill -- Editor of the Boston Cooking School Journal
  • Dr. Henry Hartshorne, M.D.. Ll.D. -- Author of "Essential of Practical Medicine"
  • and Other Specialists

Profusely Illustrated With Color Plates, Half-Tone Engravings and Text Pictures

Copyright 1909, by M. L. DBWSNAP

-Introduction
This volume is dedicated to the busy American housewife, in the hope that its use will lighten her toil and prove to be a trusted helper in the numerous duties ...
-The Model Cook Book
This is a complete guide in all the duties of the kitchen, containing general instructions on the care of the fire and cooking. It also tells how to prepare ...
-The Art Of Cooking
The section of the house which is most rarely seen by the visitor is the one which is most necessary to his comfort and that of the family. While the drawing- ...
-The Kitchen Fire
To make a fire in a stove or range, take off the covers, brush out the ashes and knock all clinkers from the sides of the fire box. Open all the dampers. Bring ...
-Soups And Their Preparation
In making soup uncooked meat should always serve as the basic element. Cracked bones of cooked game or of rare beef and mutton may be added if desired, but the ...
-Beef Soup
. Select a shin of beef of five or six pounds' weight, crack the bone, thoroughly wash and place it in a kettle to boil, with five or six quarts of cold water.
-Veal Soup
Put a three-pound knuckle of veal into three quarts of cold water, with salt and one small tablespoonful of uncooked rice. Boil slowly for three hours, or ...
-Chicken Cream Soup
Take two young or one full grown chicken. Cut it into pieces and put these into a soup kettle with half a pound of ham, and an onion; add four quarts of cold ...
-Mutton or Lamb Broth.
Take four pounds of lean mutton or lamb, and cut into small pieces, which boil slowly in a gallon of water, in a covered vessel, for two hours. Soak a half ...
-Mock Turtle or Calf's Head Soup.
Scald a well-cleaned calf's head, remove the brain, and boil the head until the meat will easily slip from the bone. Then take out the head ; cut it in small, ...
-Force-Heat Balls for Soup.
The forcemeat balls, mentioned in the preceding recipe, may be thus made. Take one cupful of cooked veal or fowl meat, minced ; mix with this a handful of fine ...
-Ox Tail Soup.
Boil two ox tails three to four hours, season with salt, black pepper and a small piece of ripe pepper pod. Add one-half cup barley, previously soaked in cold ...
-Vermicelli Soup.
Take four pounds of lamb, removing all fat, one pound veal and a slice of ham, cut up, cover with a quart of cold water, and let it heat slowly. Keep it ...
-Philadelphia Pepper Pot
Put two pounds of tripe and four calves' feet into the soup pot and cover them with cold water ; add a red pepper, and boil until the calves' feet have become ...
-Noodles for Soup
Beat up one egg light, add a pinch of salt, and flour enough to make a very stiff dough ; roll out like thin pie crust, and dredge with flour to keep from ...
-Fish Soup
Select a large, fine fish, clean thoroughly, and put over the fire in water, allowing one quart for each pound of fish. Add an onion cut fine, and a bunch of ...
-Oyster Soup.
Strain the juice from two quarts of oysters, add to it a teacupful of water, and heat slowly in a covered vessel. When near boiling, season with salt and ...
-Oyster Bouillon.
Wash and chop fifty good-sized oysters, put them in a double boiler, cover and cook slowly for an hour ; add a pint of water, a level teaspoonful of celery ...
-Clam Soup.
Take twenty-five clams, and chop fine. Pat over the úre the liquor that was drained from them, pour in a cup of water, and let boil ten minutes ; then add the ...
-Green Turtle Soup
Chop the coarser meat of the turtle, with the bones, add four quarts of water, with salt, pepper, two onions, and a bunch of sweet herbs. Stew slowly for four ...
-Chicken Soup.
Prepare a fowl for cooking. Separate it at the joints and cut it into small pieces. Put the meat into a saucepan with three pints of water and cook it slowly ...
-Vegetable Soup.
Scrape one small carrot and pare one small turnip, removing a thick skin. Grate and add them to one cup of soup stock and let it simmer 45 minutes. Pare one ...
-Thick Vegetable Soup
Put 1 lb. shin bone into one pint cold water with one-half teaspoonful each of salt and sugar, let it simmer. Brown two sliced onions in one table-spoonful of ...
-Pea Soups
Green Pea Soup. Put the empty pods of a half peck of peas into a gallon of water, and boil for an hour. Then strain, put in four pounds of chopped beef, and ...
-Bean Soups
Bean Soup. Cook three pints soup or marrowfat beans, with one and one half pounds of fresh pork. When done remove the meat. Take out a dish of beans to serve ...
-Corn Soups
Corn Soup. Stew one-half can or two cups corn with one-half cup water until soft. Scald one pint milk, with salt and pepper added, in the top of a double ...
-Graham Soup.
Chop up finely three onions, three carrots, four turnips, and a bunch of celery. Put on the fire in about three quarts of water. Simmer half an hour, then add ...
-Tomato Soup.
Stew a quart of peeled tomatoes until soft, strain, and add a pinch of soda. Set over the fire again, adding a quart of hot milk; season with salt and pepper, ...
-Potato Soup.
Three potatoes, one and one-half cups water, three cups milk, one onion, three teaspoonfuls salt, one and one-half tablespoonfuls flour, one and one-half ...
-Cream of Tomato or Mock Bisque Soup.
Stew one can tomatoes until soft, strain, and add one-half teaspoonful soda. Melt three tablespoonfuls butter in a saucepan, and stir in two tablespoonfuls ...
-Fish
The variety of edible fish is very considerable, most of them being wholesome and nutritious. Yet white fleshed and red-fleshed fish, oily fish, shell-fish, ...
-Fried Fish.
Most of the smaller fish are eaten fried. They are generally termed pan-fish. Clean well, cut off the head, and, if the fish is large, cut out the backbone, ...
-Steamed Fish.
Bend the body of the fish in a circle, pour over it half a pint of vinegar, season with pepper and salt, and let it stand an hour in a cool place. Then pour ...
-Cooking Shad
Broiled Shad. Split and wash the shad, and dry it in a cloth. Season with salt and pepper. Grease the gridiron well, heat it, and lay the shad upon it, the ...
-Cooking Salmon
Broiled Salmon. Cut into slices an inch thick, and season with pepper and salt. Having buttered a sheet of white paper, lay each slice on a separate piece, and ...
-Cooking Codfish
Boiled Fresh Codfish. Before cooking, soak in slightly salted water for half an hour. Then wipe dry, and wrap in a linen cloth, dredged with flour, and sew up ...
-Baked Whitefish.
Clean the fish and sut off the head, if preferred; cut out the backbone to within two inches of the tail, and stuff the fish with the following mixture : Soak ...
-Cooking Catfish
Stewed Catfish. Skin, clean, and cut off the heads. Sprinkle with salt, and lay in a cool place. Then cover with cold water in a saucepan, and stew gently for ...
-Cooking Trout
Boiled Salmon Trout. Clean, wash, and dry the fish. Wrap in a thin cloth, cover with salted water, and boil gently for half an hour, or longer for large fish.
-Cooking Terrapin
Terrapin. Cut off head and dress. Boil till tender with a little salt and a pinch of soda added to the water. When tender take from water and pick to pieces, ...
-Fish Chowder.
Take 1 lb. cod or haddock ; put the head, bones, fins and skin into one cup cold water and let simmer. In one tablespoonful of dripping brown one small onion.
-Fish Sauce.
Put four tablespoonfuls butter into a saucepan, and cook in it the same measure of flour. Add two cups boiling water, milk or fish-stock, four tablespoonfuls ...
-Shell Fish.
Of shell-fish the oyster is the general favorite among epicures and everyday people alike. It is more wholesome eaten raw than when cooked, the flesh being ...
-Cooking Oysters
Fried Oysters: Recipe 1 Remove all bits of shell from oysters, lay them on a clean cloth, and pat them gently to dry them. Shake salt and pepper over them.
-Cooking Clams
Creamed Clams. Have twenty-five clams chopped fine. Put in a chafing dish two tablespoonfuls butter; when melted add two tablespoonfuls flour. Add the clams ...
-Clam Chowder.
For this take fifty clams, a bowl of salt pork, cut up fine, and one of onions, finely chopped, with the same or a greater quantity of potatoes cut into small ...
-Devilled Crabs.
Extract the meat from boiled crabs and mince it finely. Season well with mustard, cayenne, salt, and some sharp sauce. Toss and stir till well mixed, and cook ...
-Cooking Lobster
Lobster Croquettes. Add pepper, salt, and powdered mace to the meat of a boiled lobster, chopped fine. Mix with this a quarter of its quantity of bread crumbs, ...
-Scallops Fricasseed or Fried.
Of scallops only the muscular part is used. Fricasseed they form one of the nicest of luncheon dishes. Wash them thoroughly in cold water, drain, and pour over ...
-Other Fish
Breakfast Mackerel. Soak the fish over night, next morning put in a skillet in cold water. Let come to a boil and pour off water, add more and let come to a ...
-Poultry and Game Birds.
The term poultry includes chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Its flesh is lighter in color than that of other animals, but it is very nourishing. The flesh ...
-Rolled Rib Roast With Riced Potatoes
Practical Directions: Remove the bones from a rib roast and skewer the meat into a round shape; dredge with flour and set on a rack in dripping pan, into a hot ...
-Roast Turkey
Practical Directions: Remove tendons from the legs, singe and draw the turkey; remove pin feathers, wash and dry carefully; fill with stuffing if desired; ...
-Poultry Dressings
Turkey or Chicken Dressing. Crumble one loaf of bread fine, soften with melted butter, cover closely, let stand from half to one hour, then add salt, pepper ...
-Roast Turkey with Oysters.
Clean a turkey and lay it in a dripping pan; prepare a dressing of stale bread, composed of one quart of bread crumbs and one cupful of butter, and water ...
-Roast Chicken.
Pick and draw your chicken, wash in two or three waters, and add a little soda to the last but one if there is any doubtful odor. Fill the bodies and crops ...
-Roast Goose.
The goose should be absolutely young; fill with dressing made of two pints bread crumbs, one onion chopped fine, three tablespoonfuls butter, one egg, slice of ...
-Fricasseed Chicken.
For this the fowls need not be as tender as for roasting. Clean, wash, and cut up, and place for half an hour in salt water. Then put into a pot, with half a ...
-Broiled Chicken.
Be sure that your chicken is young. If in doubt as to this, it is best to make it tender by steaming. Place Sticks across a dripping pan full of boiling water, ...
-Broiled Chicken on Toast.
Broil in the usual way, and when the fowl is thoroughly done take it up in a square pan, butter it well, season with pepper and salt, and set it in the oven ...
-Stewed Duck.
Prepare the fowls by cutting them up, in the same way as chicken for fricassee. Lay some very thin slices of salt pork upon the bottom of a stew pan, and place ...
-Chicken Croquettes.
Take the cold chicken, chop very fine, use about one-third as much cracker crumbs (not too fine) as you have meat. Season with salt and pepper; add one egg ...
-Chicken Hash.
Remove the meat from the bones of cold stewed chicken, cut into small pieces, putting these in the gravy. Set on the fire with milk enough to cover; add butter, ...
-Chicken Stew.
Cook the fowl in the same manner as for fricassee. When the meat is tender remove it from the water and serve with a sauce prepared with the liquid in which ...
-Chicken Pie.
Boil chicken until tender (one year old is best), peel half dozen potatoes while it is stewing. To make the crust, take one quart of flour, one tablespoonful ...
-Smothered Chicken.
Singe a young chicken and split it down the back; take out the intestines; wipe it with a damp towel; lay the chicken with inside downward in the baking pan, ...
-Chicken Salad.
Mince the white meat of a cold boiled or roasted chicken, removing all fat, gristle, or skin. Cut celery into bits half an inch long, making three-fourths the ...
-Roast Game.
To roast a partridge, grouse, or any other gallinaceous bird, is one of the simplest processes of cooking, yet one in which the game is often spoiled by being ...
-Broiled Game
Partridges, split in the back, and broiled over a bright fire, with a dressing of salt, pepper and butter, make an excellent dish. Care must be taken not to ...
-Rail and Reed Birds.
Rail, when roasted on the spit, enveloped in greased paper, are very good. They should never be stuffed. Fifteen minutes will cook them if the fire be brisk.
-Cooking Rabbit
Fried Rabbit. Freeze or soak in salt water over night; cut off all the fat. Boil tender, changing the water once or twice. Dip in a batter and fry in hot ...
-Quail on Toast.
Pick dry, draw and split down the back; wash and soak in salt water a few minutes, drain and dry with a cloth. Broil and baste often with butter; set in the ...
-Roast Pigeon.
When clean and ready for roasting, fill with dressing made same as for turkey or chicken. They must be well basted with melted butter, and roast from three- ...
-Game Pie.
When several kinds of small game are brought in, the best way to utilize them is to stew each kind tender, add them together with enough butter to make the ...
-Meats
What we call flesh is chiefly composed of muscle, with a certain proportion of fat and a considerable quantity of water. A piece of fresh beef, thoroughly ...
-Choice of meat
To Choose Beef. In ox-beef the grains should be loose, the flesh red, and the fat of a fine cream-color. Cow-beef has a closer grain, a whiter fat, and meat ...
-Choosing Eggs.
Put your tongue to the larger end; if it feel warm, the egg is fresh. Or put the egg into a pan of cold water; if perfectly fresh, it will sink immediately, ...
-Modes of Cooking Meats.
Meat may be boiled, roasted, stewed, fried, or prepared in other ways. Tender cuts should be cooked in their own juices to preserve the flavor. The meat should ...
-Yorkshire Pudding.
This is an excellent addition to a roast of beef. To make it, take one pint of milk, four eggs white and yolks beaten separately one teaspoonful of salt, and ...
-Broiled Beef
Broiled Beefsteak. Place the steak in a wire broiler; hold it over the fire, near the coals; count ten slowly, then turn it; continue to count ten and turn ...
-Beef Steaks
Beefsteak Smothered in Onions Season the steak with salt and pepper, dredge with flour, and brown in hot fat. When done on one side, turn and put in the sliced ...
-Beef Stews
Beef Stew Put on to boil in quarts of water three three pounds of beef without bone. Let boil until tender, and add potatoes; season with salt and pepper. When ...
-Beef Roasts
Roast Beef. The sirloin and rib pieces of the beef are the best for roasting the latter for small families. Have the butcher remove the bone and skewer the ...
-Beef Tongue
Pickled Beef Tongue. Wash tongue thoroughly, soak over night in salt water; put in cold water and cook until tender, remove the skin while warm; put in stone ...
-Boiled Beef
Boiled Beef to Serve Cold. Take a boiling piece of beef, roll and tie, put in kettle with boiling water, salt and pepper. Chop fine one small onion, break in ...
-Meat Croquettes.
One cup of cold chopped beef, one cup bread crumbs, one egg. Pour over this enough of the hot liquor to make quite soft. Add salt and pepper, make in small ...
-Spiced Beef.
Four pounds of round beef chopped fine, trim off the fat, add three dozen crackers, rolled fine, four eggs, one cup milk, one tablebpoonful ground mace, two ...
-Curing Fresh Beef.
To each one hundred pounds of beef take four gallons of water, put in kettle, also six pounds common salt, two ounces saltpetre; simmer over slow fire, and ...
-Dried Beef.
This is commonly served raw, shaved into thin slices; but is more savory if cooked. Put the slices into a frying-pan, cover with boiling water; cook for ten ...
-Veal
Veal Stew. Two pounds of veal, one tablespoonful of lard, one tablespoonful of butter; slice one medium sized onion over the meat, add one-half teacup of ...
-Calf's Head.
After washing, take out the brains and put in a cool place. Tie the head in a floured cloth and boil for two hours, adding some salt to the water. Wash and ...
-Fried Sweetbreads
To fry sweetbreads, wash carefully and rub dry, lard with narrow strips of fat pork, and lay in a hot frying-pan, well greased, and cook to a of water. Do not ...
-Chicken and Sweetbread Croquettes
Practical Directions Add to a sweetbread cooked, cooled and chopped, not too fine enough chopped chicken to make one pint in all Melt one-fourth a cup of ...
-Ham and Bacon
Broiled Ham. Cut in slices, soak well in scalding water, wipe dry, and lay in cold water for five minutes. Wipe again, and broil over a clear fire. Pepper ...
-Pork Dishes
Pork Pie. One pound of pork chopped in small pieces, four good sized potatoes chopped in squares, cover over with water and cook until tender. Cook meat awhile ...
-Venison
Venison Cutlets. Trim your cutlets nicely, using the trimmings to make gravy, in the proportion of half a pound to a cup of water. Put in bones, fat, etc., and ...
-Medallions of Mutton with Green Pea Salad
Practical Directions: Remove the bones and fat from lamb or mutton chops, and skewer the meat in rounds. Braise the meat with the bones and fine-cut vegetables ...
-Hashes
Potato and Meat Pie. Chop cold meat fine, removing the bones, fat and gristle. Put the meat into a pudding-dish, measuring it to find the quantity. To each cup ...
-Sandwiches
Ham Sandwiches. Four pounds of ham chopped fine. Dressing : Yolks of four eggs. four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one small teaspoonful of mustard, one-half ...
-Eggs Preparation
Eggs form a valuable food and should be used as a substitute for meats and in combination with starchy foods. Fresh eggs should always be used, if obtainable.
-Boiled and Poached Eggs
Boiled Eggs (A). Have a saucepan of boiling water. Remove to the back of the stove where the water will not boil and add the eggs, being careful that there is ...
-Fried Eggs and Omelets
Fried Eggs. Break the shells and drop the eggs one by one in hot fat; dip the fat over them until the white is set; dust with pepper and salt and serve hot; ...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation
In the cooking of vegetables it should be borne in mind that all woody tissues, whether in the roots or stalks, the husks or skins, are nearly devoid of ...
-Boiled Potatoes
Boiled Potatoes (with the skins). Select potatoes of uniform size, wash well in salted water and boil till a fork will penetrate with ease to the center of the ...
-Fried Potatoes.
Fried Potatoes. Pare, wash and slice some new potatoes, or cold boiled potatoes, season with pepper and salt, and fry lightly in dripping or butter, turning ...
-Baked Potatoes.
Baked Potatoes. Wash some large potatoes, wipe, and bake in a quick oven till tender. Break the skins that the steam may escape. Serve in a napkin with the ...
-Cooking Sweet Potatoes
Boiled Sweet Potatoes. Choose potatoes of the same size, if possible. Put into boiling salted water, and cook till a fork will easily pierce the largest. Pour ...
-Cooking Tomatoes
Fried Tomatoes. Wash the tomatoes and cut them in slices without removing the skin. Mix together, sprinkle pepper, quarter teaspoonful salt and tablespoonful ...
-Cooking Cabbage.
Boiled Cabbage. Wash the cabbage in cold water, trim off the limp outside leaves, cut into eight pieces, or, if it must be cooked quickly, chop it into smaller ...
-Sour-crout.
Barrels having held wine or vinegar are generally used in which to prepare sour-crout, but it is better to have a special barrel for the purpose. Slice white ...
-Boiled Cauliflower.
Take off leaves and cut stalk close to flower bunch. Soak in cold water half an hour, then tie in coarse bobbinet lace or cheese-cloth to prevent breaking, put ...
-Cooking Onions.
Boiled Onions. Place onions in cold water and peel. Then cover with boiling water in a saucepan. Cook fifteen minutes, drain, and cover again with boiling ...
-Cooking Corn
Boiled Green Corn. Test corn with finger nail. When the grain is pierced the milk should jet out, and not be thick. Strip off the outer leaves, turn back the ...
-Cooking Beans
Green Beans To cook green beans (fresh from the vines) without pork, have the kettle hot, and put in a tablespoonful of lard, let it get hot, stir in the lard ...
-Cooking Peas
Green Peas. Take fresh peas, hull them, put in pan in cold water for half an hour, and cook twenty or thirty minutes in small quantity of boiling water. Drain, ...
-Cooking Beets
Boiled Beets. Take small, smooth beets: wash carefully, and put into boiling water Boil an hour or two, or until tender. Do not probe them, but press with ...
-Spinach.
Pick off the roots and decay ed leaves; wash thoroughly in three or four waters. Put the spinach into a large kettle, without water. Put it on the back part of ...
-Cooking Egg-plant
Fried Egg-plant. Cut the egg-plant into slices one-quarter inch thick; salt each slice separately, putting one on top of another; put on the upper slice a ...
-Stewed Salsify or Oyster-plant
Scrape the roots and place in cold water, to prevent discoloration. Cut in inch-long pieces. Cover with hot water in a saucepan and boil tender. Then pour off ...
-Asparagus.
Asparagus. Recipe 1 Break asparagus stalks in pieces any desired length; boil until tender; season with salt, pepper, and plenty of butter; thicken with a ...
-Boiled Turnips.
Scrub the turnips and pare off the thick skin. Cut into slices or quarters, and cook in boiling salted water until soft. Then put them into a piece of coarse ...
-Cooking Carrots
Carrots. Scrub and scrape off a very thin skin. Cut each carrot into slices from one-quarter to one-half inch thick, and cook in boiling salted water until ...
-Cooking Parsnips
Parsnips. Scrub, scrape off a thin skin, cut each parsnip into quarters lengthwise, and cook in boiling salted water, from thirty to forty minutes, until soft.
-Cooking Squash and Pumpkin
Summer Squash. When young and tender, this can be fried in the same manner as egg-plant. Winter squash takes much longer to cook, and should be soaked in cold ...
-Vegetable Hash.
Chop up coarsely the vegetables left over from dinner cabbage, parsnips, potatoes, beans, etc. Sprinkle them with a little pepper. Take a saucepan or frying- ...
-Milk and Cheese.
Milk should be kept covered with a cloth to prevent it from absorbing impurities from the air. It should be sterilized for babies and young children; ...
-Sterilized Milk.
Sterilize milk bottles or jars by boiling them twenty minutes in water. Remove them, fill two-thirds full of milk, and cork with baked or prepared cotton or ...
-Cold Custard or Junket.
Warm one quart new sweet milk, add two tablespoonfuls sugar, and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Pour the mixture into a glass or china dish and add one ...
-Steamed Plum Pudding
Practical Directions: Mix thoroughly together half-a-pound of fine chopped suet, half a-pound of bread crumbs, two ounces (half a cup) of flour, a teaspoonful ...
-Cornstarch Blanc Mange.
Scald a pint of milk in a double-boiler. Add one table-spoonful sugar and a sprinkle of salt, with some mashed or preserved strawberries or a little cocoa, ...
-Toast and Cheese.
Prepare toast; dip in hot, salted water; grate enough dry cheese to cover the slices; set in the oven to melt, and put the slices together as sandwiches. This ...
-Cheese Pudding.
Butter a baking dish, put in a cup of grated breadcrumbs and a half cup grated cheese in layers, or mix and keep some crumbs for the top. Beat an egg slightly, ...
-Rice and Cheese Pudding.
Pick over and wash a cup of rice. Steam until soft in salted water, in a double-boiler. Butter a baking dish, put in the rice and two cups of grated cheese in ...
-Welsh Rarebit.
Take half pound grated cheese and quarter cupful milk or cream, put into a double-boiler, and stir until the cheese is melted. Beat one egg, and add mustard, ...
-Cheese Sticks.
Take one pint flour, one-half pint grated cheese; mix and make paste with lard the size of an egg; make the same as pie crust. Roll out and cut in strips one ...
-Cheese Straws.
One cup of grated cheese, one-half cup butter, three-fourths cup of flour, sifted, one small teaspoonful dry mustard, four teaspoonfuls of cold water; mix all ...
-Macaroni With Cheese
Take twelve sticks of macaroni broken into one inch lengths, and cook in three pints of boiling salted water twenty minutes; turn into a colander and pour over ...
-Sauces and Salads.
Drawn Butter. Take one and one-half teaspoonfuls flour, make of it a thin paste with cold water, and stir it into a teacupful of hot water. Bring to a boil, ...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry.
Bread is one of the most important articles of diet. It is made of flour, salt, water, and yeast. The flour best adapted for bread-making is that from wheat, ...
-Excellent Yeast.
Boil two ounces of the best hops in four quarts of water for half an hour; then strain and let stand until lukewarm. Put it in an earthen bowl, add half a ...
-Yeast Cakes.
Boil one quart pared and sliced potatoes and a double handful of hops (tied in a muslin bag) in two quarts of water for nearly an hour. Then take out the hops ...
-Wheat Bread.
Take a cup of lukewarm milk, or of water with a teaspoonful of butter, a quarter cake yeast dissolved in a quarter cup of lukewarm water, or a quarter cup of ...
-Bread Made with a Sponge.
Use recipefor bread, stirring in only enough flour tomake a thick batter. Let the batter riseover night. In the morning add flour tomake a stiff dough, and ...
-Graham Bread
Graham Bread. Take one teacupful of wheat flour, a half teacupful each of molasses and of good yeast, a teaspoonful of salt, and a pint of warm water. Mix ...
-Brown Bread.
Boston Brown Bread. Mix together thoroughly two cupfuls of rye meal or Graham flour, one cupful corn meal, one half teaspoonful salt, and one-quarter ...
-Corn Bread.
Boston Corn Bread. Take one cupful of sweet and two of sour milk, two-thirds cupful of molasses, a cupful of wheat flour, four cupfuls corn-meal, and a ...
-Johnnie Cake.
Sift into a pan one quart of Indian meal, and, making a hole in the middle, pour in a pint of warm water, and add a teaspoonful of salt. Mix the meal and water ...
-Lunch Biscuit.
To enough raised dough to make a loaf, add one-half cupful sugar, one-half cupful lard, and mix thoroughly. Roll to one-fourth inch thickness and cut with ...
-Rusk.
Two teacupfuls raised dough, one teacupful sugar, half cupful butter, two well-beaten eggs, flour enough to make a stiff dough; set to raise, and, when light, ...
-Parker House Rolls.
Scald a pint of milk, melt in it while warm a piece of butter the size of an egg, add a tablespoonful of sugar, a pinch of salt, and a cupful of yeast. Add ...
-French Rolls.
These may be made of the bread dough prepared for baking. Where making bread, reserve enough dough for rolls. Work into this a tablespoonful of lard or butter, ...
-Risen Biscuit.
Mix one quart milk, three-quarters of a cupful each lard or butter and yeast, two tablespoonfuls white sugar, and a teaspoonful of salt, with flour enough to ...
-Gluten Bread.
Scald a pint of milk; when lukewarm, add the whites of two eggs slightly beaten, and one yeast cake dissolved in two tablespoonfuls of warm water; add ...
-Gluten Muffins.
Separate two eggs; beat the yolks; add a pint of milk. Add to this a half pint of gluten flour, a half tea-spoonful of salt. When thoroughly mixed, add a ...
-Sally Lunn.
Warm one-half cupful of butter in a pint of milk; add a teaspoonful of salt, a tablespoonful of sugar, and two quarts of flour. Beat thoroughly, and while the ...
-English Crumpets.
To a quart of warm milk, add half a cup of yeast, a teaspoonful of salt, and flour enough to make a stiff batter. When light, rub in half a cupful of melted ...
-Rice Cakes.
Take one cup cold boiled rice, one pint flour, two well-beaten eggs, a teaspoonful salt, and milk to make a moderately thick batter. Beat well together and ...
-Flannel Cakes.
A quart of milk, a tablespoonful of butter, two well-beaten eggs, a teaspoonful of salt, and three tablespoonfuls of yeast, with flour enough to make a good ...
-Buns.
Break one egg into a cup and fill with sweet milk; mix with it half cupful yeast, half cupful butter, one cupful sugar, enough flour to make a soft dough; ...
-Coffee Cakes.
To one quart light dough add one cupful sugar, one-half cupful butter, one cupful raisins, and season with cinnamon or nutmeg to taste; let raise, then roil ...
-Biscuits.
Biscuit. One quart flour, one teaspoon ful salt, one of soda, sift together and rub in one tablespoonful of lard, sour milk to make a soft dough, bake ...
-Muffins.
Graham Muffins. Mix together thoroughly one and one-quarter cupfuls Graham flour, one cupful white flour, scant teaspoonful soda, and a teaspoonful salt. Add ...
-Gems.
Breakfast Gems. One heaping pint flour, one teaspoonful baking powder, one teaspoontul salt, butter half size of an egg, one teacupful water. Bake fifteen ...
-Waffles.
Waffles. Mix one quart each milk and flour, five tablespoonfuls yeast, and a teaspoonful of salt. Set this over night as a sponge. In the morning add two eggs ...
-Griddle Cakes.
Take one cupful flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, and a sprinkle of salt. Sift the dry ingredients together into a bowl. Beat an egg, add a scant cupful ...
-Cereals.
In cooking cereals use plenty of water. Be careful to cook cereals thoroughly. Cereals should be cooked in a double boiler, to prevent scorching. Avena or ...
-General Directions for Making Cakes part 1
For cakes which contain butter, cream the butter, warm slightly if hard, add sugar gradually, and beat. When smooth add the yolks of eggs or whole eggs (beaten ...
-General Directions for Making Cakes part 2
Gold Cake. Take one-half pound of pulverized sugar, one-quarter pound of butter, one half pound of flour, one-half cup of milk, the yolks of six eggs, a half ...
-General Directions for Making Cakes part 3
Mountain Cake. Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs beaten together until light, three cups flour, one cup sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, ...
-General Directions for Making Cakes part 4
Cream Cake. One cup sugar, one and one-half cups flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Beat two eggs until very light, put in cup and fill up with cream. Bake ...
-Making Cake Frostings
Boiled Frosting. Take one cup granulated sugar, one-half cup water, one eighth teaspoonful cream of tartar, mix together and cook without stirring until the ...
-Making Cake Fillings
Chocolate Filling. Beat together the yolks of two eggs, one-half cup cream, one-half cup sugar, two sections of a cake of chocolate; put in saucepan and boil ...
-Gingerbread and ginger cakes.
Soft Gingerbread. One-half cup of lard, one cup each of milk and sugar, two of molasses, one teaspoonful soda, two tablespoonfuls cinnamon, and one of ginger.
-General Directions for Making Cakes part 5
Risen Doughnuts. Take a pint of boiling milk, two cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, a half pint of yeast, and two eggs. Beat together the eggs, butter and ...
-General Directions for Making Cakes part 6
Lemon Crackers. Two and one-half cups soft sugar, one cup lard, one pint sweet milk, two eggs, five cents' worth baking ammonia, two cents' worth lemon oil.
-Custards and Creams. part 1
Cup Custard. Scald one pint milk. Beat two eggs, add the milk, sprinkle of salt and two tablespoonfuls sugar, and stir until the sugar dissolves. If desired, a ...
-Custards and Creams. part 2
Floating Island. Scald one pint milk. Separate three eggs. Add salt and two tablespoonfuls sugar to the yolk and beat. Beat the whites until very stiff, add ...
-Custards and Creams. part 3
Peach Cream. To one quart of ripe peaches, peeled and rubbed through sieve, add whites of two eggs, one cup granulated sugar. Beat together until a stiff cream ...
-Custards and Creams. part 4
Lemon Jelly. Take one ounce gelatine, cover with one pint cold water, let stand for one hour. Add one pint of hot water and juice of three lemons; sweeten to ...
-Puddings. part 1
Cabinet Pudding. Cream together a quarter pound butter and a pound and a half of sugar. Add the beaten yolks of five eggs, and a half pound of flour moistened ...
-Puddings. part 2
Rice Pudding. Wash a cup of rice and soak for two hours in a pint of milk. Then add three pints of milk, a spoonful of salt, butter of the size of an egg ...
-Puddings. part 3
Suet Pudding. Three cups flour, one cup chopped suet, one heaping cup chopped raisins, one teaspoonful salt, two teaspoonfuls baking powder; mix one cup flour ...
-Puddings. part 4
New Century Pudding Take one cup each of suet, sugar, currants, raisins and milk, add three cups of flour. Shred and chop fine the suet and prepare the fruit.
-Puddings. part 5
Cup Pudding. Make a batter as for waffles; to one pint of milk allow two eggs and enough flour to thicken, one teaspoonful baking powder, stirred in the flour.
-Puddings. part 6
Cherry Roll. Seed one quart fruit, sweeten to taste, let it simmer in its own juice until quite thick, pour one quart of milk over a loaf of grated bread, beat ...
-Puddings Sauces
Pudding Sauce. One cup boiling water, one tablespoonful corn starch, one-fourth cup butter, one cup sugar, one egg, one-fourth nutmeg, one or two ...
-Pies and Pastry.
Pie-Crust. One cup shortening, three cups flour, little salt, rub the flour, shortening and salt all well together. Use enough cold water to hold all together, ...
-Blackberry Shortcake
Practical Directions: Sift together three cups of pastry flour, one teaspoonful of salt, and six level teaspoon fuls of baking-powder; with the tips of the ...
-Pies. part 1
Apple Pie. Pare, core, and slice tart apples, put a layer of fruit in your crust, sprinkle thickly with light brown sugar, add more apples, and go on till ...
-Pies. part 2
Mince Pie. Take four pounds of meat (boiled lean beef) and apple two-thirds being apple. Add half a pound of suet. Chop each separately, and when fine mix ...
-Pies. part 3
Strawberry Pie. Line a deep pie pan with rich crust, and bake. Fill with the following: Whites of two eggs, half cup of sugar, one pint of fresh berries. Beat ...
-Dumplings
Apple Dumplings (Boiled). Make your crust of a quart of flour and a quarter pound of suet, with a teaspoonful each of salt and cream-of-tartar and half one of ...
-Jellies. part 1
Apple Jelly. Slice nice clean apples in preserving kettle with enough water to almost cover. When stewed soft, strain through the jelly bag. Measure juice and ...
-Jellies. part 2
Grape Jelly. Take grapes just turning ripe, wash, put in granite kettle with very little if any water, let simmer for one hour. Then mash, strain through ...
-Butter
Cider Apple Butter. Boil one barrel of new cider down half, peel and core three bushels of good cooking apples. When cider has boiled to half the quantity add ...
-Jams
Strawberry Jam. Take a quart of berries, mash with a potato masher, add one pint granulated sugar, and cook fast, stirring constantly, until of the desired ...
-Preserves
Pineapple Preserves. Pare, slice pineapples; to every pound of fruit add one pound of sugar; place in jars a layer of apple, then of sugar; let stand over ...
-Canned Fruit and Vegetables
Canned Strawberries. Wash berries thoroughly before picking off stems; weigh them. To each pound of berries allow one quarter pound of sugar. Let them cook ...
-Baked Fruit And Sauces
Baked Apples. Wipe and core sour apples. Place them in an earthen or agateware baking dish never use tin for apples and fill the centre of each apple with ...
-Ices and Ice Cream. General Rules
Ice (or snow) and salt are necessary for freezing cream, fruit, etc. Salt melts the ice, and in melting it absorbs heat from the cream, thus causing the cream ...
-Ice Creams
Vanilla Ice Cream. One quart of cream, one pint of milk, two cups sugar, one tablespoonful vanilla, white of one egg, beaten; strain cream. For peach ice cream ...
-Ices and Sherbets
Orange and Lemon Water Ice. Juice of four lemons, juice of four oranges, four cups sugar, four cups water, whites of four eggs, well beaten, add last, then ...
-Pickles. part 1
Gherkin Pickles. Use small cucumbers or gherkins. Pack in a stone jar in layers, salting each layer thickly. Cover the top layer deep with salt, pour cold ...
-Pickles. part 2
Pickled Beets. Boil until quite soft; when cool cut lengthwise to size of small cucumbers, boil equal parts vinegar and sugar with half a tablespoonful ground ...
-Pickles. part 3
Tomato Pickles. Slice thin one gallon green tomatoes, salt and let stand over night; next morning drain, chop one gallon cabbage, grate one quart horseradish.
-Pickles. part 4
Tomato Sweet Pickles. Slice tomatoes, salt and let stand over night; then drain well and place in porcelain kettle and cover with vinegar; let come to boil, ...
-Pickles. part 5
Higdin Pickle. Take one peck green tomatoes and a dozen medium-sized onions. Cut and slice these, and salt and mix together. Let them stand over night, then ...
-Salads. part 1
Apple Salad. Take one-third more apples than celery (chopped), put in as many English walnuts or hickorynuts as you like. Dressing; Yolks of three eggs, beaten, ...
-Salads. part 2
Cooked Slaw. One small head of cabbage cut fine; put one tablespoonful butter in a skillet; when melted, stir in the cabbage. Mix the yolk of one egg, one- ...
-Salads. part 3
Tomato Salad. Pour boiling water over four or six tomatoes, and let it stand a moment. Pour off, and add cold water, slip off the skins, slice, and set away to ...
-Salad Dressings
Cream Salad Dressing. Mix one-half each, salt and mustard, with one table-spoonful of sugar, add one beaten egg, two and one-half tablespoonfuls butter, and ...
-Candies and Confections. part 1
Butter Scotch. One cup of light brown sugar, one-half cup of hot water, a table-spoonful of butter, a tablespoonful of vinegar; boil about twenty minutes, ...
-Candies and Confections. part 2
Ice Cream Candy. Two cups granulated sugar, a scant half cup water, a lump of butter the size of a walnut, and one quarter teaspoonful cream of tartar. Flavor ...
-Candies and Confections. part 3. Creams
Chocolate Creams. Beat the white of one egg and add to it two tablespoonfuls cold water and half teaspoonful vanilla. Stir in gradually enough confectioner's ...
-Candies and Confections. part 4
Home-made Candy. Two pounds white sugar, one pint water; boil until it cracks when dropped in cold water; add three tablespoonfuls vinegar and one-half ...
-Beverages. part 1
Tea. The water for tea should be freshly boiled. An earthenware pot should be used. Scald the pot, put in one teaspoonful tea and pour on one cup of boiling ...
-Beverages. part 2
Cream Nectar. To one gallon boiling water add four pounds granulated sugar and five ounces tartaric acid. Beat the whites of three eggs, and pour into a bottle ...
-Dishes for the Sick. part 1
Beef Tea. One pound of lean beef cut fine, put in a glass fruit jar, without water, cover tightly and set in a pot of cold water. Heat gradually to a boil and ...
-Dishes for the Sick. part 2
Oatmeal Gruel. Mix together two tablespoonfuls of oatmeal, one-fourth tea-spoonful salt, one teaspoonful sugar and one cup boiling water. Cook thirty minutes ...
-Dishes for the Sick. part 3
Oyster Toast. Take six oysters, strain off the liquor, add to it one-half cup milk. When hot add the oysters; boil one minute. Season with butter, salt and ...
-Menus for Various Occasions.
Breakfast. Fruit. Oat Meal. Cream and Sugar. Broiled Steak. Fried Potatoes. Biscuit. Coffee. Lunch. Cold Chicken. Saratoga Chips. Apple Sauce. Wafers.
-Menus for Formal Occasions.
A Formal Breakfast or Luncheon Bouillon in Cups. Wafers Sweetbreads. Rolls. Broiled Chicken, Cream Sauce. Peas. Tomatoes, Mayonnaise Dressing Thin Bread and ...
-Menus for Holiday Occasions.
Thanksgiving Dinner. Oyster Soup. Olives. Celery. Roast Turkey. Chestnut Dressing Cranberry Sauce. Pickles. Sweet Pickles Fruit Salad. Scalloped Potatoes.
-Quick Meals.
Breakfast. Fruit. Boiled Eggs. Coffee. Milk. Toast. Dinner. Beef Stew. Hashed Brown Potatoes. Sliced Tomatoes. Junket. Supper. Toast and Cheese. Brown Bread.
-Small Evening Party Menus.
Thin Slices Bread. Butter Tongue Salad. Cucumber Pickles. Coffee. Clam Sandwiches. Fruit Salad. Mixed Pickles. Cheese Straws. Tea. Ham Salad. Thin Slices ...
-Afternoon Reception Menus.
Clam Broth in Cups. Wafers. Salmon Sandwiches. Olives. Tongue Salad in Tomatoes. Coffee. Strawberry Ice Cream. Angel Food. Chocolate Cake. Bonbons. Salted ...
-Small Picnics.
Cold Tongue. Brown Bread and Butter. Sliced Tomatoes. Tea. Gingerbread. For the children, Whole Wheat Bread and Milk, Fruit, Gingerbread. Cheese Sandwiches.
-Table-Setting And Serving
A table should be made to look as neat and attractive as possible. Dust the table, and lay evenly on it a cloth of felt-flannel or cotton-flannel. Spread the ...
-The Breakfast Table.
Proceed as directed above, with the addition of the carving knife and fork at the right hand of the one who carves, and with the salt and pepper bottles ...
-The Dinner Table.
The dinner table is usually laid for courses. First. Soup and rolls, croutons or baked crackers. Second. Meat, potatoes and vegetables. Third. Dessert. Arrange ...
-Table Serving General Directions.
When the waiter passes the food to each person it should be passed on the left side of the person. In placing a dish in front of a person the waiter should ...
-Cuts Of Meats And Their Uses
Every housekeeper, in fact, every one who has marketing to do, should know something of the cuts of all common meats and the most desirable way each can be ...
-The Kitchen.
The kitchen arrangements will depend upon many conditions, as size, shape and means of owner. But every kitchen can always be kept neat and tidy and supplied ...
-Outside The Kitchen
The kitchen, while the humblest, is the most important section of the household, and we have accordingly given ample space to its greatly varied culinary ...
-Diary of a Week's Work in a Kitchen.
On Monday the maid is expected to devote the morning to the heavy labor of washing; rising early, and getting the day's labors well under way before the ...
-Sweeping and Cleaning the Kitchen.
When preparing to sweep a room, it is important to begin by dusting all the bric-a-brac and carrying it to a place of safety. The smaller articles can be ...
-Cleanliness About the House.
It is very important that beds are properly aired every day. The most effectual way to do this is to throw the clothes over a chair, and lift the mattress ...
-Causes of Unwholesomeness.
The healthiness or unhealthiness of a house depends greatly upon its degree of cleanliness. Dirty houses are always more or less unwholesome. In country places ...
-Care of Floors.
Floors should not be scrubbed too frequently. Once a week is generally sufficient. In damp weather wet floors dry very slowly, and the house remains damp and ...
-Household Utilities
It is proposed, in the present section of our subject, to give practical advice on various questions of household utility, such as the care of clothing, the ...
-Care of Furs, Feathers and Woolen Goods.
Many things and substances are recommended for the destruction of injurious insects. Pliny says that the Romans used citron to preserve their woolen garments ...
-Cleaning of Lace.
Fine laces should be washed as seldom as possible; but when it is necessary, most women prefer to have them washed under their own eyes. Make hot soap suds ...
-How to Wash Woolen Goods.
Clean rose-colored cashmere by washing in cold soapsuds. If you attempt to put dye in the water, the material will be spoiled. Rinse well in cold water, and ...
-How to Wash Colored Fabrics.
Nearly all colored fabrics stain the water used to clean them, and that without losing their own brightness in any way. No article of a different color should ...
-How to Wash Flannels.
It is very important, in washing flannels to prevent shrinkage. The articles should be washed and rinsed in water of the same temperature, and not allowed to ...
-Care of Muslins
Muslin dresses, even of the most delicate colors, can be cleaned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, without losing their color. Melt half a pound of soap ...
-How to Wash Silks.
Lay the silk smoothly on a clean board, rub soap upon it, and wipe it with a piece of velvet. Never brush it; the brush ruins it. When it has been in this ...
-How to Wash Velvets.
Velvet garments which have been stained, or worn, or have grown glossy, may be renovated so as to look new. The garment must, of course, be ripped, breadth by ...
-How to Wash Veils, Hats, Etc.
Wash faded ribbons in cold soapsuds Rinse, shake out, spread on the ironing-board, and cover with muslin, ironing while damp. Women in mourning frequently ...
-Laundry Work.
In washing clothes, dissolve pipe-clay in the water, a cent's worth to four gallons. It will be found to clean clothing with halt the labor, and considerably ...
-To Wash Chenille Curtains.
Two ounces ether sulphate, two ounces borax, two ounces soda, one cake ivory soap; shave soap and let dissolve in warm water, then add all the ingredients to ...
-To Clean Kid Gloves and Shoes.
An easy way to perform this is to stretch the glove in some way as on the open hand, and rub it carefully with moistened flannel, having first placed a little ...
-The Removal of Stains.
Ink stains on woolen goods and cloth may be removed with oxalic acid, diluted, or rubbed over with strong vinegar, so that it may not injure the stuff. This ...
-Marble and Furniture Polish.
A good marble polish is the following: Melt over a slow fire four ounces of white wax, and, while still warm, stir into it an equal weight of oil of turpentine.
-Recipes for Cleaning Steps and Flag-stones.
Where there are large flights of stone steps and broad pavements of flag-stones, the process of cleaning is a tedious one. To clean with hearthstone, or caked ...
-Recipes for Cleaning Damp Walls.
Damp walls may be dealt with in the following manner: Mix two quarts of- tar with two ounces of kitchen fat, and boil together for a quarter of an hour. Then ...
-To Clean Soiled or Stained Furniture.
Use spirits of turpentine, and afterwards polish with linseed oil colored with alkanet root. If, however, the furniture is badly stained or inky, it should be ...
-To Clean Decanters and Water-bottles.
When these, from containing hard water for a considerable time, have become coated in the interior with a deposit of carbonate of lime and other impurities, ...
-Cleaning Copper Utensils.
These can be given a clean, bright surface by the use of nitric acid. The desired surface is thus obtained quickly and with little trouble. But there is the ...
-To Clean and Brighten Brussels Carpets.
Take a fresh beef-gall, break it into a clean pan; pour one-half into a very clean bucket, and nearly fill it with luke warm water; take a clean, coarse cloth, ...
-To Extract Grease from Papered Walls.
Dip a piece of flannel in spirits of wine, rub the greasy spots gently once or twice, and the grease will disappear. Oil-Marks on wall-paper, or the marks ...
-To Remove Stains in Tables
Wash the surface with stale beer or vinegar; the stains may then be removed by rubbing them with a rag dipped in spirits of salts. To re-polish, proceed as you ...
-Removal of Dry Putty.
The difficulty of removing hard putty from a window-sash can be obviated with great readiness by simply applying a piece of heated metal, such as a soldering- ...
-To Clean Straw Matting.
Wash as seldom as possible, but when it is necessary to do so use salt and water. Salt prevents the matting from turning yellow. Dry as fast as you wash, and ...
-To Remove Mold from Fabrics.
Rub them over with butter, and then apply potash moistened in a little water, and rub the spot until all traces of it disappear; then wash in plenty of water ...
-Cleansing Picture Frames.
Black walnut frames will become dull and rusty-looking. They may be renewed by first brushing thoroughly with a stiff brush to re move dust, and then applying ...
-To Clean Mirrors, Looking-Glasses, Etc.
Take a soft sponge, wash it well in clean water, and squeeze it as dry as possible; dip it into some spirits of wine and rub over the glass; then have some ...
-To Take Stains Out of Marble.
Mix unslaked lime in finest powder with the strongest soap-lye, pretty thick, and instantly with a painter's brush lay it on the whole of the marble. In two ...
-To Take Iron Stains Out of Marble.
An equal quantity of fresh spirits of vitriol and lemon-juice being mixed in a bottle, shake it well; wet the spots, and in a few minutes rub with soft linen ...
-To Take Bruises Out of Furniture.
Wet the part with warm water; double a piece of brown paper five or six times, soak it and lay it on the place; apply on that a hot flat-iron till the moisture ...
-To Remove Glass Stoppers.
When the stopper of a glass decanter is too tight, a cloth wet with hot water and applied to the neck will cause the glass to expand, and the stopper may be ...
-Household Pests.
To Destroy Crickets or Roaches. Put some strong snuff in the cracks and holes in which they hide. The parings of cucumbers will, if strewn about near their ...
-A Simple Disinfectant.
Put into a saucer some fresh-ground coffee, and in its centre place a small piece of gum camphor, which set on fire with a match. As it burns add coffee enough ...
-Glass and China Cement.
Curdle a half pint of milk with the same quantity of vinegar; separate the curd from the whey, and mix the latter with the whites of four or five eggs, beating ...
-Cracks in Floors.
These may be filled neatly and permanently by thoroughly soaking newspapers in paste made of half a pound of flour, three quarts of water and half a pound of ...
-Cracks in Plaster.
A good filling is plaster of Paris mixed with vinegar, which will not set for twenty or thirty minutes, while water will set very quickly, often before you can ...
-To Prevent Mold.
Add to paste, ink, mucilage, or other substance liable to mold, a little carbolic acid. An ounce of this acid to a gallon of whitewash will keep cellars and ...
-Spots on Furniture and Fabrics.
These may be removed by a wash of four ounces of ammonia, one ounce each of glycerine, castile soap, and spirits of wine. The soap must be dissolved in two ...
-To Freshen Gilt Frames.
Dust carefully, then wash with one ounce of soda beaten up with the whites of three eggs. Where scratched, patch up with gold paint. To clean oil paintings use ...
-To Take Out Paint.
Mix ammonia and turpentine in equal parts, saturate the spot two or three times, and wash out with soapsuds. This will take out paint from clothing even if dry ...
-Brief Recipies for Housekeepers
How to Clean Hair Brushes. Dissolve a little soda in warm water, and pour in a small amount of ammonia. Hold the brushes with the bristles downward, and avoid ...









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