In no other land has the baking and consumption of bake-stuffs grown to such an extent as it has within the past few years in this country. Even in the household of the most humble workman, as in the mansion of the rich and prosperous merchant, the American cook and housewife is generally more praised and esteemed for her good bread, pastry and desserts, than for meat cooking. In looking over the numerous cook books that are now placed so freely before the public, the inexperienced can find no way of learning how or why the recipes read as they do. Before any success in baking can be expected, the cook, baker or housewife must be educated to all the particulars of the materials they are about to use.

It is the main object of this work to show in plain language all who are interested how to become successful in baking; the theories of how to put together and how to change recipes, when the same grades or brands of materials are not on hand. Judgment and common sense must be displayed to insure success. Did you ever hear a woman say, "I had good luck to-day with my cakes," but alas, the next time, "Oh, I had such bad luck with my baking"? There it is; one day good luck, the next time ashamed to show the result of her labor, and all the good materials wasted. It is the lack of theoretical knowledge about baking that brings the bad luck, and many a professional baker is not able to explain the real cause of the mishap. The theories herein laid out plainly before the reader are all the result of careful, practical experiments, and are based upon accomplished facts.

Being confident of the success of my efforts in demonstrating some new and practical points to all interested in baking, and wishing to prepare delicious desserts, I shall herewith give my recipes in several parts, each part treating upon a different branch in the art of baking.

Emil Braun. New York City.