By using compressed yeast, the time necessary for the fermentation can be accurately calculated, if the right temperature and the right blend of flours are used.

To get a uniform loaf of bread should be the aim of every workman. A batch of dough should never be made without the temperature of flour and bakery being accurately taken and, from that, the heat of the water calculated, not guessed at.

A main point is to keep the temperature of the bake shop as regular as possible by means of heating or ventilation.

The most favorable temperature for the fermenting room is 76 F.

The best temperature for a dough directly after mixing is 78 F. in summer to 82 F. in winter.

The following example will serve to show how the proper temperature of a dough may be obtained under unfavorable conditions:

If the temperature in the shop is

85

F.

And the temperature of the flour

67

F.

Then let the water be of

82

F.

3)

234

F.

Making the desired average

78

F.

If the temperature of the shop is

72

F.

And the flour

62

F.

Then heat the water to

100

F.

3)

234

F.

Making the desired average

78

F.

With the use of a good thermometer, which should always be found in a well-regulated bakery, there should be no excuse for not having good bread, nor delays in getting the bread ready by a specified time. Neither should a master-baker be excused for having the dough ready for the oven before it can receive it.

For high-speed dough mixers a special allowance must be made which is from two to thirty-five degrees Fahrenheit.

This allowance must be deducted from above calculation for water temperature.