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Drinks Of The World | by James Mew



From the Cradle to the Grave we need Drink, and we have not far to look for the reason, when we consider that at least seventy per cent of the human body is composed of water, to compensate the perpetual waste of which, a fresh supply is, of course, absolutely necessary. This is taken with our food (all solid nutriment containing some water), and by the drink we consume. But, as the largest constituent part of the body is fluid, so, naturally, its waste is larger than that of the solid; this fluid waste being enormous. Besides the natural losses, every breath we exhale is heavily laden with moisture, as breathing on a cold polished surface, or a cold day by condensing the breath, will show; whilst the twenty-eight miles of tubing disposed over the surface of the human body will evaporate, invisibly, two or three pounds of water daily. Of course, in very hot weather, or after extreme exertion, this perspiration is much more, and is visible.

TitleDrinks Of The World
AuthorJames Mew
PublisherScribner & Welford
Year1892
Copyright1892, Scribner & Welford
AmazonDrinks of the world,

By James Mew, Author of "Types from Spanish Story," etc., etc.,

And John Ashton, Author of "Social Life in the Reign of Queen Anne," etc., etc.

One Hundred Illustrations

"Ingeniosa Sitis." - Martial, Epig. xiv. 117.

"J'y ai songé comme un autre, et je suis tenté de mettre l'appétence des liqueurs fermentées, qui n'est pas connue des animaux, à côté de l'inquiétude de l'avenir, qui leur est étrangère, et de les regarder l'une et l'autre comme des attributs distinctifs du chef-d'œuvre de la dernière révolution sublunaire." - Brillat-sa-varitiy Physiologie du Goût, Medit. 9.

"Ac si quis diligenter reputet, in nulla parte operosior vita est, ceu non saluberrimum ad potum aquae liquorem natura de-derit, quo caetera omnia animantia utuntur." - Pliny, Nat. Hist. xiv. 28.

"Wine that maketh glad the heart of man." - Ps. civ. 15.

Drinks Of The WorldDedication
-Introduction
From the Cradle to the Grave we need Drink, and we have not far to look for the reason, when we consider that at least seventy per cent of the human body is composed of water, to compensate the perpet...
-The Drinks Of Antiquity
Egypt: Method of Wine-making - Early Wines - Names of Wines - Ladies and Wine - Beer, etc. Assyria: List of Assur-ba-ni-pal's Wines - Method of Drinking - Different Sorts of Wine. Hittite: Two Ladies ...
-The Drinks Of Antiquity. Continued
1 See tailpiece, where a servant is coming to the assistance of her mistress. 2 Jablonski is our authority for supposing it primarily an Egyptian. This zythum is nearly allied to the sacer...
-Classical Wines. Greek Wines
Homer's Wine of the Coast of Thrace - Pramnian Wine - Psithian, Capnian, Saprian, and other Wines - The Mixing of Wines - Use of Pitch and Rosin - Undiluted Wine - Wine Making -Spiced Wines - A Greek ...
-Roman Wines
Falernian, Caecuban, and other Wines - Galen's Opinion - Columella's Receipt - The Roman Banquet - Dessert Wines - The Supper of Nasidienus - Dedication of Cups - Wines mentioned by Pliny made of Figs...
-Northern Drinking
Beowulf - Ale - Beer - Mead - English Wine - The Mead Hall-drinking Horns - Tosti and Harold - Pigment, etc. - The Clergy, etc., drinking - Northern Wine drinking - King Hund-ing - Brewing - Strange D...
-The Pusey Horn
This horn is an old tenure horn. It was once the custom, when making a gift of land, instead of making out a deed of gift, to present some article of personal use, such as a knife, a drinking or hunti...
-Ulph's Horn
Of this horn Dugdale 1 says: About this time also, Ulphe, the son of Thorald, who ruled in the west of Deira,2 by reason of the difference which was like to rise between his sons, about the sharing o...
-Wines
Definition - Various Meanings of Wine - Alcohol - Varieties of Wine - Miller - Professor Mulder - Origin of Wine - Brook of Eshcol - Strabo and Reland - Francatelli's Order of Wines -Classification of...
-African Wines
Of this country the most important wines of the present are, perhaps, Pontac, Hanepoot, Frontignac, and Drakenstein. On the wines of the Cape of Good Hope, Dr. Edward Kretschmar is a great authority. ...
-American Wines
The first attempt to cultivate the wine in North America was made, we are informed by Drs. Thudichum and Dupre, in 1564. Some of its best known wines at the present time are the Calawbas 2 (still and ...
-Australian Wines
Australian wines are pretty well known from our tradesmen's circulars. For instance, there is the Gouais, the Carbinet, a soft wine like Burgundy, the Mataro, the Sauvignon. There is that elegant din...
-Canary Island Wines
The Canary Islands have long been celebrated for their wines. The favourite Teneriffe wine is Vidueno or Vidonia. Canary sack is supposed to have been made from the Malvasia sweet grape, whereas the m...
-British Wines
British made wines hold no very high rank. A cheap foreign manufacture is, according to some of their vendors, gradually ousting them from the market. But at one time they formed a part of the educati...
-French Wines
The Great Makers of Champagne - Its Manufacture - Bottling -Treatment - Bordeaux or Claret - Its early Use and Name -Whence it comes - The different Growths - White Wines of the District - Burgundy - ...
-Champagne Wines
Reims and Epernay are the two great centres of the Champagne district; but Reims, from its size and antiquity, must be considered its capital. Here are the establishments of Pommery & Greno, Ernest Mo...
-Champagne Wines. Part 2
The next process is corking, and, as we all know, champagne corks are not as other corks. They are made larger than the vent of the bottle, and are soaked in water, and very often steamed. They are so...
-Champagne Wines. Part 3
The wines of Bordeaux used to be greatly drank in England until the great wars with France - in the last century, when, of course, their importation was prohibited - but, even then, large quantities w...
-The Dilletante Society
In this illustration of the Dilletante Society we find that Noblemen and Gentlemen such as Lord Mulgrave, Lord Seaforth, Hon. Chas. Greville, Charles Crowle, and the Duke of Leeds, drank their clare...
-German Wines
The Germans, says Cyrus Redding, like vain men of other nations, have wasted a good deal of idle conjecture on the antiquity of the culture of the vine in their country; and then, as though to show by...
-Greek Wines
The vinification of Greece is commonly imperfect. Most of its wines become vinegar in summer. Avoid, says a well-known guide-book, the wine of this country, which is generally acid and always impure.1...
-Hungarian Wines
The wines of Hungary, we are told, possess considerable body with a moderate astririgency. The varieties of wine known as Ausbruch and Maszlacz, including the Tokays, Rust, Menes, and many more, are...
-Italian Wines
That Italy produces good wines is, says Cyrus Redding, undeniable. She also produces wines that are very bad. The best Italian wines are said to be produced in Tuscany. As Hafiz is the authority for a...
-Madeira Wines
Wine is first mentioned as a product of Funchal, the capital of Madeira, in the fifteenth century. In 1662, when Charles II. married the Infanta Catherine of Braganca, English merchants began to settl...
-Persian Wines
The ancient, most famous wines of this country were those of Chorassan, Turan, and Mazanderan. These places still produce wines; but their characteristics and reputation have, it is affirmed, become b...
-Portuguese Wines
One hundred and fifty years ago, in the small town of Peso da Regoa, then called Regua only, near the confluence of the Corgo with the Douro, lived a single nsherman, in a hut which he had himself con...
-Introduction Of The Gout
-The Gout
Some of the best wines are produced by Estrema dura, such as Bucellas, Collares, Lavradio, Chamusca, Carcavellos, Barra a Barra, and many others of which not even the names are known in England. The v...
-Russian Wines
Kahetia is a wine produced in a district of that name, east of Tiflis. It is of two descriptions, red and white, and is much esteemed throughout Trans-caucasia. As it is kept in skins made tight with ...
-Sicilian Wines
A thousand years before Christ, says Mr. Sim-monds, districts of Sicily were famous for wine. The coins of Naxos (500 B.c.) bear the head of Bacchus on the obverse, on the reverse Pan, or a bunch of g...
-Spanish Wines
As Spain succeeds France geographically, so it follows it in the excellence of its vinous productions. Throughout all ages this country has been distinguished for its wines. But the Spaniard's chief g...
-Switzerland
Swiss wines are commonly consumed only in Swit-zerland. The best is produced in the Grisons, called Chiavenna, aromatic and white from the red grape. A white Malvasia of good quality is made in the Va...
-Apples For Cider - Cider
The original meaning of the word cider 1 appears to have been strong drink. It was used to designate a liquor made of the juice of any fruit pressed, and an example of the word in this use is to be fo...
-Perry
Perry is prepared from pears, as cider from apples It is capable of being used in the adulteration of champagne.1 The harsher, redder, and more tawny pears produce the best drink. Perry is less popula...
-Brandy
The Invention of Brandy - Early Alchemists - Aqua Vitse -Distillation - The Still-room - Ladies Drinking - Nantes and Charente - Johnson's Idea of Brandy - The Charente District - Manufacture of Brand...
-Brandy. Continued
1 A Spanish Wine. 2 ? Orrice. 3 Stir. 4 Phial. It would make a Man smile to behold her Figure in a front Box, where her twinkling Eyes, by her Afternoon's Drams of Ratifee and cold Tea, s...
-Gin
Massinger's Duke of Milan - Pope's Epilogue to Satires - The Dun-ciad - William III. - Lord Hervey - Sir R. Walpole - The Fall of Madame Geneva - Hogarth's Gin Lane - Schiedam Adulteration - Gin Sling...
-Gin. Part 2
On Feb. 20, 1736, in the ninth year of George II., a petition of the Justices of the Peace for Middlesex against the excessive use of spirituous liquors was presented to the House of Commons, setting ...
-Gin. Part 3
Gin Lane. Gin, cursed fiend, with fury fraught, Makes human race a prey; It enters by a deadly drought, And steals our life away. Virtue and Truth, driven to despair, Its rage compels to ...
-Whiskey
Uisge-beatha - My Stint - Its Manufacture - Good and Bad -Early Mentions of Whiskey - Materials used in its Manufacture - St. Thorwald - Duncan Forbes and Ferrintosh - Duty on Whiskey - Silent Spiri...
-Whiskey. Continued
Perhaps the earliest historical account of Scotch whiskey is the grant, in 1690, to Duncan Forbes of Culloden, in consideration of his services to William III., of the privilege of distilling whiskey,...
-Rum
Derivation of Name - Whence Procured - Its Manufacture - Its Price - Trade Rum. The etymon of the name of this spirit is somewhat dubious. Some have it that it was formerly spelt (as it now is i...
-Liqueurs. I
Derivation of Term - Eichhoff - Gregory of Tours - Liqueur Wines - Herb Wines - Scot's Ivanhoe - Hydromel - Murrey - Delille - Montaigne - Monastical Liqueurs - Arnold de Villeneuve - Catherine de Med...
-Liqueurs. I. Continued
The search for the philosopher's stone and the powder of projection was by no means wholly fruitless. It strengthened the hands of chemistry. It was also the cradle of liqueurs. In the early part of t...
-Liqueurs. II
Liqueur Maker's Guide. German Liqueurs: Eau d'amour - Eau Divine. Dantzig Liqueurs: Eau Miraculeuse - Eau Aerienne. French Liqueurs: Vespetro - Scubac - Absinthe - Maraschino, etc. The Verger - Vermat...
-German Liqueurs
Eau de Sultane Zoraide. Lemon peel, 8 ounces; orange peel, 8 ounces; figs, 8 ounces; dates, 4 ounces; jessamine flowers, 4 ounces; cinnamon, 3 ounces; spirits of wine, 60 o.p., 19 quarts; orange-flowe...
-Eau Divine
Lemon peel, 1 1/2 pounds; coriander, 4 ounces; mace, cardamom, 1 ounce each; spirits of wine, 60 o.p., 19 quarts; oil of bergamot, 1 1/2 drams; oil of Neroly,1 2 drams; water, 14 quarts; capillaire, 8...
-Eau De Pucelle
Juniper berries, 1 1/2 pounds; fennel seed, 4 ounces; angelica seed, cinnamon, 3 ounces each; cloves, 1 ounce; spirits of wine, 60 o.p., 19 quarts; water, 13, quarts; capillaire, 10 quarts. Colour, ye...
-Eau Aerienne.2
Figs, 12 ounces; cumin, 5 ounces; leaves of rosemary, fennel seed, 4 ounces each; cinnamon, 5 ounces; sage, sassafras, 2 ounces each; lavender flowers, camomile flowers, orris root, 4 ounces each; spi...
-Eau Aerienne.2. Continued
1 Cassis would appear to be the name of a ville (Bouches-du-Rhone) which has a commerce of wine and fruit. The first Ratafia was called Eau de Cerises, or cherry water. The kernels should be added ...
-American Drinks
Cobblers - Cocktails - Flips, etc. - Punch - Varieties - A Bar Tender - Anstey's Pleader's Guide - A Yard of Flannel - Bottled Velvet - Rumfustian, etc. The great authority, probably the greatest a...
-Mint Julep
The julep is especially popular in the Southern States, and is said to have been introduced into England by Captain Marryatt. That romance-writing seaman in his work on America, says: I must descant ...
-Mint Julep. Continued
A crown bowl of punch. It has been said that of punches there are at least threescore. Here follow a few of the many varieties: Brandy, Sherry, Gin, Whiskey, Port, Sauterne, Claret, Missisi...
-Bottled Velvet
(a la Sir John Bayley). A bottle of Moselle, 1/2 a pint of sherry, small quantity of lemon peel, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar. Well mix, add a sprig of verbena, strain, and ice. ...
-Stone Fence
One wine glass of whiskey (Bourbon), 2 small lumps of ice. Use large bar-glass, and fill up with sweet cider. ...
-Sleeper
To a gill of old rum add 1 ounce of sugar, 2 yolks of eggs, and the juice of half a lemon. Boil \ a pint of water with 6 cloves, 6 coriander seeds, and a bit of cinnamon. Whisk all together, and strai...
-Rumfustian
Whisk yolks of a dozen eggs, and put into a quart of beer and a pint of gin. Put a bottle of sherry into a saucepan, with a stick of cinnamon, a grated nutmeg, a dozen lumps of sugar, and the thin rin...
-Bimbo Punch
Steep in 1 quart cognac brandy 6 lemons, cut in thin slices, for six hours. Then remove lemon without squeezing. Dissolve 1 pound loaf sugar in I quart boiling water, and add this hot solution to the ...
-Black Stripe
Into a small bar-glass pour 1 wine glass of Santa Cruz rum and 1 tablespoonful of molasses; cool with shaved ice, or fill up with boiling water, according to season. Grate nutmeg on top. This is ordin...
-Beers
Definition - Different Modes of Manufacture - Antiquity - Osiris, the Inventor - Adam's Ale - Egyptian - Scandinavian - Adulterations. Africa: Pitto, Ballo, Bouza. America: Persimon,chica, Vinho de Ba...
-African Beer. Pitto
Captain Clapperton (Expedition to Africa, i., 133, 187) found at Wow-wow, the metropolis of Borghoo, a kind of ale bearing the name of pitto, obtained from the same grain as that used for the same pur...
-American Beer. Persimon Beer
Persimon beer, from the fruit of the date plum (Diospyros Virginiana), is drunk in North America. In South America, long before the Spanish conquest, the Indians prepared and drank a beer obtained fro...
-Austrian Beer
The most famous beer is perhaps the Pilsener, or white beer, from Pilsen in Bohemia, the favourite drink in Vienna. Gratzer is brewed from wheat malt. ...
-Bavarian Beer
The peculiar flavour of the Bavarian ale is perhaps ,a result of the very free use of pitch or resinous matters to protect the wood of the fermenting tun, but it seems more probable that it is due to ...
-Belgian Beer
White beers, the result of a mixture of oats and wheat, called Walgbaert and Happe, were made in Brussels in the fifteenth century. Roetbier and Zwart-bier were, as their names tell us, red and black ...
-Borneo Beer
The aborigines1 of Borneo, if we are to believe Commodore Roggewein,2 are the basest, most cruel and perfidious people in the world. They are honest, industrious, strongly affectionate and self-den...
-Chinese Beer. Tar-asun
Tar-asun, extracted from barley or wheat, is the beer of China. It is sweet, and commonly drunk warm, before distillation. The mixed liquor from which it is prepared is called tchoo, or wine; after th...
-England
Love of the English for Beer - A National Drink - Private Brewing - A French View of English Society - Sir John Barleycorn-the Black Jack and Leather Bottel - Toby Philpot-burton-on-trent - Bott...
-England. Part 2
Here you have the Substance of the Evidence given in against him on his Trial, with the Names of the Judges, Jury, and Witnesses. Also the Comical Defence Sir John makes for himself, and the Character...
-England. Part 3
Then I wish, etc. The next most popular English drinking vessel was the greybeard, or as it was sometimes, but seldom, called the Bellarmine, from the Cardinal of that name so famous for his contr...
-France Beer. Cervoise
In France beer was originally known as cervoise from the Low Latin cerevisia. There are two sorts, white and red; the latter has more hops. When much grain enters into the composition it is called dou...
-German Beer. Mum of Brunswick
Of the many beers of this country, perhaps the most deserving of notice here is the Mum of Brunswick, well known and appreciated for its excellence. The process observed in its manufacture has been, i...
-Indian Beer. Pachwai
The Hill-tribes of India commonly consume Pachwai prepared from rice and other grain in Bengal. In Nepaul a beer named Phaur, made from rice or wheat, is brewed much in the same manner as English ale,...
-Japanese Beer. Kaempfer
Kaempfer, in his History of Japan, i., 121, tells us that in the manufacture of Sacke or Saki3 a strong and wholesome beer produced from rice, the Japanese are not excelled by any other people. This b...
-Russian Beer. Quass, or Kvas
Quass, or Kvas, a word signifying sour, an ancient Scythian beverage, is the ordinary household beer of Russia. A variety of it called Kisslyschtschy is variably described as exceedingly pleasant, and...
-Swedish Beer. Spruce Beer
Swedish beer is made at Stockholm. Spruce beer is much in use. This drink is said to have originated from a decoction of the tops of the spruce fir. In Norway and Denmark as well as in Sweden this liq...
-Tartary Beer
The beer to be met with in Tartary is for the most part of an indifferent quality. That brewed from barley and millet by the Turkestans, termed baksoum, more resembles water boiled with rice than beer...
-Tea. I
Popularity of Tea as a Drink - Consumption in England, and comparative Use all over the World - Legend of its Origin - Date of its Use - Growth of the Plant - Different Kinds of Tea - Great Falling of...
-Tea. I. Continued
Tea-plants are grown from seeds, and are made bushy by pinching off the leading shoots. They are planted in rows, each plant being three or four feet distant from the other, and the leaves are strippe...
-Tea. II
Introduction of Tea into Europe - Early Authorities thereon - Tay - Its Introduction into England - Excise Duty thereon - Thomas Garway's Advertisement. When tea was first introduced into Europe ...
-Tea. II. Continued
Tay is not only good for the head; it has a marvellous effect in comforting the stomach, and aiding the digestion, so that it is ordinarily drank after dinner, but not generally after supper, if slee...
-Tea. III
Pepys and Tea - First English Poem on Tea - Price of Tea temp Queen Anne - Scandal over the Tea Cup - Jonas Hanway and Dr. Johnson on Tea - Love of the latter for this Beverage - How to make Good Tea....
-Tea. III. Continued
In curious Cups the liquid Blessing flows, Cups fit alone the Nectar to enclose. Dissembled Groves and Nymphs by Tables plac'd, Adorn the Sides, and tempt the Sight and Taste, Yet more the gay, the lo...
-Mate. Maté
Its Use in South America - Districts where Grown - Its Manufacture - Early Notice of - The Maté Cup and Bombilla - Method of Drinking - Its Rapid Deterioration. Yerba Maté, or Paraguay Tea, which i...
-Cuca
Where Grown - Sustaining Power of Cuca - Early Mention of it, and Methods of Preparing and Using it - Cowley on Cuca - Its Modern Manufacture and Cost - Its Medicinal Properties - Cocaine and its Dang...
-Cuca. Part 2
'dried and beaten to powder, to ease and assuage the 'inflammation, or swelling of any Wound; it is good 'to strengthen bones which have been broken, and 'expell colds from the Body, and to prev...
-Cuca. Part 3
1 Lima. A plant having such manifold and beneficent properties must needs have a supernatural origin, and the Indians had a belief that the goddess Varischa first introduced the Cuca plant into Per...
-Cuca. Part 4
In Caravaya and Bolivia the soil in which the Coca grows is composed of a blackish clay, formed from the decomposition of the schists, which form the principal geological features of the mountains. On...
-Kola
Whence Kola comes - Early Mention of - Early Trade in - Cure for Drunkenness - The Cattia edulis - Substitutes for Tea. Kola can scarcely be called a tea, because, as a drink, it is produced from a...
-Coffee
Its Growth and Birthplace - Where most Drank - Legends as to its Origin - Its Gradual Spread - Introduction into Europe and England - Pasqua Rosee's Handbill - The English Coffee Houses - Their Rules ...
-Coffee. Continued
First publiquely made and sold in England, by Pasqua Rosee. The grain or berry called Coffee, groweth upon little Trees, only in the Deserts of Arabia. It is brought from thence, and drunk ge...
-Coffee Topics
Different Sorts of Coffee - Its Enemies - Its Composition and Treatment - Methods of Making - Adulterations - Liberian Coffee-date Coffee and other Substitutes. There are about twenty-two species o...
-Cocoa
Where Cocoa is Grown - Its Manufacture - Its Use Abroad and in England - Cocoa as a Drink - Chocolate, Edible and Otherwise - Substitutes for Cocoa. Linnaeus was so fond of the drink made from the ...
-Chocolate Drinking
Cocoa as a drink is far more nutritious than either tea or coffee, and like those two substances it has a volatile oil which gives the delicious aroma, and an active principle resembling Theine or Caf...
-Aerated Drinks
Ginger Beer - Old and New Methods of Manufacture - Lemonade -Chemicals in Non-alcoholic Drinks - Fruit Syrups - Non-alcoholic Cordials and Liquors - Natural Mineral Waters -Their Constituents - Artifi...
-Aerated Drinks. Part 2
1 An extract made from orange flowers. 2 Or Butyric Ether, known as Essence of Pine-apple. 3 Jargonelle Ether. At every turn, in all these drinks, are chemicals used. Do you want the flavour ...
-Aerated Drinks. Part 3
The ordinary soda water of commerce contains no soda, - it is made by the absorption, under pressure, of carbonic acid gas, which is generally obtained from chalk or whitening, and sulphuric acid, whi...
-Milk
First Food of all Mammals - Skim and Butter Milk - Chemicals used in its Preservation - Condensed Milk - Syllabubs - Koumiss - Its Early Use - When first utilized in Medical Treatment - Koumiss from C...
-Milk. Continued
1 Raspberries. But in 1858 Dr. Postnikof started an establishment for the cure of diseases by fermented mare's milk, at Samara, in Eastern Russia, and a similar establishment, about forty-five mile...
-Drinks
Jewish Prayers respecting various Drinks - Women's Tears - Dew -Oil - Sea Water - Blood - Vegetable Water - Ganges Water -Vinegar - Ptisana - Toast Water - Bragget - Ballston Water -arm Water - Asses'...
-Drinks. Part 2
Bory de St. Vincent,2 in his Essais sur les Isles Fortunes, an entertaining description of the archipelago of the Canaries, says that in Fer, one of the Canary Islands, a nearly total privation of run...
-Drinks. Part 3
was swete as braket or the meth, Or hord of apples, laid in hay or heth. 1 Another description is, Ale mixed with pepper and honey. And in Beaumont and Fletcher's Little Thief, or the Night-...
-Drinks. Part 4
The only wine in Sumatra, according to Marco Polo, was derived from a certain tree, the sacred wine-tree as it might be called, in comparison with the sacred water-tree, afterwards known as Areng Sacc...









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page up: Books on Drinks and Beverages
  
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