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Miss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper



This volume embraces, in a concise form, many valuable portions of my other works on Domestic Economy, both those published by Harper and Brothers and those published by J. B. Ford and Co., together with other new and interesting matter. It is designed to be a complete encyclopaedia of all that relates to a woman's duties as housekeeper, wife, mother, and nurse.

TitleMiss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper
AuthorCatharine Esther Beecher
PublisherHarper & Brothers
Year1873
Copyright1873, Harper & Brothers
AmazonMiss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper

Miss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper

Containing five hundred recipes for economical and healthful cooking; Also, many directions for securing health and happiness. Approved by physicians of all classes.

Miss Beecher's Housekeeper And Healthkeeper:Miss Beecher s Housekeeper And Healthkeeper 2

New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, Franklin Square. 1873.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by Harper & Brothers, In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

-Part First. Chapter I. Address Of The Author To American Housekeepers
My dear Friends, - This volume embraces, in a concise form, many valuable portions of my other works on Domestic Economy, both those published by Harper and Brothers and those published by J. B. Ford ...
-Chapter II. Marketing And The Care Of Meats
Every young woman, at some period of her life, may need the instructions of this chapter. Thousands will have the immediate care of buying meats for the family; and even those who are not themselves o...
-Marketing. Beef
The animal, when slaughtered, should be bled very thoroughly. The care taken by the Jews in this and other points draws custom from &ther sects to their markets. The skin is tanned for leather, and th...
-Veal
Fig. 2. The calf should not be slaughtered until it is six weeks old. Spring is the best time for veal. It is divided as marked in the drawing. 1. The head, sold with the pluck, which includes the...
-Mutton
Fig. 3. 1. The shoulder; for boiling or corning. 2, 2. The neck and rack; for boiling or corning. 3. The loin; is roasted, or broiled as chops. 4. The leg; is boiled, or broiled, or stuffed and roa...
-Pork
Fig. 4. 1. The leg, or ham; used for smoking. 2. The hind loin. 3. The fore loin. 4. The spare-rib; for roasting; sometimes including all the ribs. 5. The hand, or shoulder; sometimes smoked, and s...
-The Care Of Meats
In hot weather, if there is no refrigerator, then wipe meat dry, sprinkle on a little salt and pepper, and hang in the cellar. Or, still better, wrap it, thus prepared, in a dry cloth, and cover it wi...
-The Care Of Meats. Part 2
To Salt Down Fish Scale, cut off the heads, open down the back, and remove most of the spine, to have them keep better. Lay them in salt water two hours, to extract blood. Sprinkle with fine salt, an...
-The Care Of Meats. Part 3
Brine Or Pickle For Corning Hams, Beef, Pork, And Hung Beef Four gallons of water; two pounds of rock-salt, and a little more of common salt; two ounces of saltpetre; one quart of molasses. Mix, but ...
-Chapter III. Stews And Soups
In using salt and pepper, diversities of strength make a difficulty in giving very exact directions; so also do inequalities in the size of spoons and tumblers. But so much can be done, that a houseke...
-Stews And Soups. Part 2
Beef And Potato Stew Cut up four pounds of beef into strips three inches by two, and put them into two quarts of water, with one onion sliced very fine. Let this simmer four hours. Add in half a cup ...
-Stews And Soups. Part 3
Veal Stew Put a knuckle of veal into two quarts of boiling water, with three tea-spoonfuls of salt and half a tea-spoonful of ground pepper. Then chop fine and tie in a muslin rag one carrot, two sma...
-Stews And Soups. Part 4
Spanish Olla Podrida Fry four ounces of salt pork in the pot, and, when partly done, add two pounds of fresh beef and a quarter of a pound of ham. Add two tea-spoonfuls of salt in cold water, and onl...
-French Modes Of Cooking Soups And Stews
The writer has examined the recipes of Gouffee, the chief French cook of the Queen of England, set forth in the expensive Royal Cook-Book; also those of Soyer and Professor Blot. She and her friends a...
-Chapter IV. Soups
General Directions Most of the preceding stews will serve also fairly as soups, by adding more water. Rub salt into meat for soups, but not for stews, as the salt extracts the juices; and in stews th...
-Soups. Part 2
Potato Soup Take six large mealy potatoes, sliced and soaked an hour. Add one onion, sliced and tied in a rag, a quart of milk, and a quarter of a pound of salt pork cut in slices. Boil three quarter...
-Soups. Part 3
A Vegetable And Meat Soup For Summer Take three quarts of stock that is duly seasoned with sugar, salt, and pepper. Add two small onions, chopped fine, three small carrots, three small turnips, one s...
-Chapter V. Hashes
These are the common ways of spoiling hashes: 1. by frying, instead of merely heating them. Melted butter and oils are good and healthful when only heated, but are unhealth-ful when fried. 2. Dredging...
-Hashes. Continued
Rice And Cold Meats Chop remnants of fresh meats with salt pork, or cold ham. Season with salt and pepper and a little sugar; add two eggs and a little butter. Then make alternate layers with this an...
-Chapter VI. Boiled Meats
An Excellent Way To Cook Tough Beef To eight pounds of beef put four quarts of water, two table-spoonfuls of salt, half a tea-spoonful of pepper, three tea-spoonfuls of vinegar, and four tea-spoonful...
-Boiled Meats. Continued
Calf's Feet Wash and scrape till very clean. Boil three hours in four quarts of water salted with four even tea-spoonfuls of salt. Take out the bones, and put the rest into a saucepan, with three tab...
-Chapter VII. Roast And Baked Meats
The beef of an ox is best, and the next best is that of a heifer. The best pieces for roasting are the second cut of the sirloin, the second cut of the ribs, and the back part of the rump. The art of...
-Roast And Baked Meats. Continued
Roast Veal Follow the above directions for roasting mutton, except to allow more time, as veal should be cooked more than mutton. Allow twenty minutes to each pound, and baste often. Too much roastin...
-Chapter VIII. Broiled And Fried Meats And Relishes
Broiled Mutton Or Lamb Chops Cut off the skinny part, which only turns black and can not be eaten. Put a little pepper and salt on each one, and broil by a quick fire. Mutton chops should be rare. B...
-Fried Meats And Relishes
The most slovenly and unhealthful mode of cooking is frying, as it usually is done. If the fat is very hot, and the articles are put in and taken out exactly at the right time, it is well enough. But ...
-Chapter IX. Pickles
Do not keep pickles in common earthenware, as the glazing: contains lead, and combines with the vinegar. Vinegar for pickling should be sharp, but not the sharpest kind, as it injures the pickles. Wi...
-Pickles. Continued
To Pickle Cucumbers Wash the cucumbers in cold water, being careful not to bruise or break them. Make a brine of rock or blown salt (rock is the best), strong enough to bear up an egg or potato, and ...
-Chapter X. Sauces And Salads
Success in preparing savory meats and salads depends greatly on the different sauces, and these demand extra care in preparation and in flavoring. The following is a sauce that is a great favorite, an...
-Chapter XI. Fish
Stewed Oysters Strain off all the oyster liquor, and then add half as much water as you have oysters. Some of the best housekeepers say this is better than using the liquor. Add a salt-spoonful of sa...
-Potatoes
The excellence of potatoes depends greatly on the species and on the age. Much also depends on the cooking, and here there are diversities of modes and opinions. Peeling potatoes before cooking saves ...
-Chapter XII. Vegetables
Fresh-gathered vegetables are much the best. Soaking in cold water improves all. Always boil in salted water, a tea-spoonful for each quart of water. Do not let them stop boiling, or they will thus be...
-Vegetables. Continued
Tomatoes Pour on scalding water, then remove the skins, cut them up, and boil about half an hour. Add salt, butter or cream, and sugar. Adding green corn cut from the cob is a good variety. Some use ...
-Chapter XIII. Family Bread
The most important article of food is good family bread, and the most healthful kind of bread is that made of coarse flour and raised with yeast. All that is written against the healthfulness of yeast...
-Recipes For Yeast And Bread
The best yeast is brewers' or distillery, as this raises bread much sooner than home-brewed. The following is the best kind of home-made yeast, and will keep good two or three weeks: Hop And Potato Y...
-Recipes For Yeast And Bread. Part 2
Bread Of Middlings Or Unbolted Flour Take four quarts of coarse flour, one quart of warm water, one cup of yeast, two tea-spoonfuls of salt, one spoonful of melted lard or butter, two cups of sugar o...
-Recipes For Yeast And Bread. Part 3
Corn-Meal Bread Always scald corn-meal. Melt two table-spoonfuls of butter or sweet lard in one quart of hot water; add a tea-spoonful of salt and a tea-cup of sugar. Thicken with corn-meal, and one-...
-Chapter XIV. Breakfast And Supper
What shall we have for breakfast to-morrow? is the constant question of trial to a housekeeper, and it is the aim of the present chapter to meet this want by presenting a good and successive variety o...
-Breakfast And Supper. Part 2
Pearl Wheat Or Cracked Wheat Boil one pint in a pail set in boiling water till quite soft, but so as not to lose its form. Add a tea-spoonful of sugar, and as much salt; also water, when needed. It m...
-Breakfast And Supper. Part 3
Drop-Cakes Of Fine Wheat Or Of Rye One pint of milk or water. One pinch of salt. Two table-spoonfuls of sugar. Three well-beaten eggs. Stir in rye, or fine or unbolted flour to a thick batter, and b...
-Chapter XV. Puddings And Pies
Where sugar is made by slaves, the little children feed constantly on it, and grow fat and healthy. But they are nearly naked, live out-of-doors, exercise constantly, and have nothing to do but play. ...
-Puddings And Pies. Part 2
Flour Puddings Take four table-spoonfuls of flour, half a tea-spoonful of salt, a pint of water or milk, three eggs, and a salt-spoonful of soda. Mix and beat very thoroughly, and bake as soon as don...
-Puddings And Pies. Part 3
Best Apple-Pie Take a deep dish, the size of a soup-plate, fill it heaping with peeled tart apples, cored and quartered; pour over it one tea-cup of molasses, and three great-spoonfuls of sugar, dred...
-Puddings And Pies. Part 4
Another Custard Boil six peach-leaves, or a lemon-peel, in a quart of milk, till it is flavored; cool it, add three spoonfuls of sugar, a tea-spoonful of salt, and five eggs beaten to a froth. Put th...
-Puddings And Pies. Part 5
New-England Squash Or Pumpkin-Pie Take a pumpkin or winter-squash, cut in pieces, take off the rind and remove the seeds, and boil it until ten-der, then rub it through a sieve. When cold, add to it ...
-Puddings And Pies. Part 6
A Dessert Of Rice And Fruit Pick over and wash the rice, and boil it fifteen minutes in water, with salt at the rate of a heaping tea-spoonful to a quart. Rice is much improved by having the salt put...
-Puddings And Pies. Part 7
Spiced Apple Tarts Rub stewed or baked apples through a sieve; sweeten them, and add powdered mace and cinnamon enough to flavor them. If the apples are not very tart, squeeze in the juice of a lemon...
-Sauces For Puddings
Liquid Sauce Six table-spoonfuls of sugar. Ten table-spoonfuls of water. Four table-spoonfuls of butter. Two table-spoonfuls of wine. Nutmeg, or lemon, or orange-peel, or rose-water, to flavor, Heat...
-Paste Foe Puddings And Pies
This is an article which, if the laws of health were obeyed, would be banished from every table; for it unites the three evils - animal fat, cooked animal fat, and heavy bread. Nothing in the whole ra...
-Chapter XVI. Cake
The multiplication of recipes for cakes, pies, puddings, and desserts is troublesome and needless, inasmuch as a little generalization will reduce them to a comparatively small compass, and yet afford...
-Cake Raised With Powders
Although it is unhealthful to use powders in bread for daily food, the small quantity used for cake will do no harm. The cake most easily made is raised with soda and cream tartar or other baking pow...
-Cakes Raised With Eggs
Pound-Cake, (very rich.) - One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, half a pound of butter, nine eggs, a glass of brandy, one nutmeg, one tea-spoonful of pounded cinnamon. Mix half the flour with the b...
-Gingerbread, Fried Cakes, Cookies, And Other Cakes
Aunt Esther's Gingerbread Take half a pint of molasses, a small cup of soft butter, a gill and a half of water, a heaping tea-spoonful of soda dissolved in a table-spoonful of hot water, and one even...
-Cake Raised With Yeast
Plain Loaf-Cake Two pounds of dried and sifted flour, a pint of warm water in which is melted a quarter of a pound of butter, half a tea-spoonful of salt, three eggs without beating, and three quarte...
-Chapter XVII. Preserves And Jellies
General Directions. Gather fruit when it is dry. Long boiling hardens the fruit. Pour boiling water over the sieves used, and wring out jelly-bags in hot water the moment you are to use them. Do n...
-Preserves And Jellies. Part 2
To Preserve Quinces Whole Select the largest and fairest quinces, (as the poorer ones will answer for jelly.) Take out the cores and pare them. Boil the quinces in water till tender. Take them out se...
-Preserves And Jellies. Part 3
White Or Green Plums Put each one into boiling water and rub off the skin. Allow a pound of fruit to a pound of sugar. Make a sirup of sugar and water. Boil the fruit in the sirup until clear - about...
-Preserves And Jellies. Part 4
Quince Marmalade Rub the quinces with a cloth, cut them in quarters. Put them on the fire with a little water, and stew them till they are sufficiently tender to rub them through a sieve. When strain...
-Chapter XVIII. Desserts And Evening Parties
Ice-Cream One quart of milk. One and a half table-spoonfuls of arrowroot. The grated peel of two lemons. One quart of thick cream. Wet the arrow-root with a little cold milk, and add it to the quart...
-Desserts And Evening Parties. Part 2
A Cream For Stewed Fruit Boil two or three peach leaves, or a vanilla bean, in a quart of cream, or milk, till flavored. Strain and sweeten it, mix it with the yelks of four eggs, well beaten; then, ...
-Desserts And Evening Parties. Part 3
Wheat Flour Blanc-Mange Wet up six table-spoonfuls of flour to a thin paste with cold milk, and stir it into a pint of boiling milk. Flavor with lemon-peel or peach-leaves boiled in the milk. Add a p...
-Desserts And Evening Parties. Part 4
Apple Jelly Boil tart peeled apples in a little water till glutinous; strain out the juice, and put a pound of white sugar to a pint of the juice. Flavor to your taste, boil till a good jelly, and th...
-Chapter XIX. Drinks And Articles For The Sick And Young Children
Drinks made of the juice of fruits and water are good for all who are in health. Various preparations of cocoa-nuts are so also. Tea is often made or adulterated with un-healthful articles. Coffee is ...
-Drinks And Articles For The Sick And Young Children. Continued
White Tea, And Boys' Coffee For Children Children never love tea and coffee till they are trained to it. They always like these drinks. Put two tea-spoonfuls of sugar to half a cup of hot water, and ...
-Chapter XX. The Providing And Care Of Family Stores
The art of keeping a good table consists not in loading on a variety at each meal, but rather in securing a successive variety, a table neatly and tastefully set, and every thing that is on it cooked ...
-The Providing And Care Of Family Stores. Continued
Butter must be kept in the dryest and coldest place you can find, in vessels of either stone, earthen, or wood, and never in tin. Lard and Drippings must be kept in a dry, cold place, and should not ...
-Chapter XXL. On Setting Tables, And Preparing Various Articles Of Food For The Table
To a person accustomed to a good table, the manner in which the table is set, and the mode in which food is prepared and set on, has a great influence, not only on the eye, but the appetite. A houseke...
-Chapter XXII. Washing, Ironing, And Cleansing
Many a woman without servants, or with those untrained, must do her own washing and ironing, or train others to do it, and this is the most trying department of housekeeping. The following may aid in ...
-Common Mode Of Washing
Assort the clothes, and put those most soiled in soak the night before. Never pour hot water on them, as it sets the dirt. In assorting clothes, put the flannels in one lot, the colored clothes in ano...
-To Manufacture Lye, Soap, Starch, And Other Articles Used In Washing
To Make Lye Provide a large tub, made of pine or ash, and set it on a form, so high that a tub can stand under it. Make a hole, an inch in diameter, near the bottom, on one side. Lay bricks inside ab...
-Directions For Starching Muslins And Laces
Many ladies clap muslins, then dry them, and afterward sprinkle them. This saves time. Others clap them till nearly dry, then fold and cover, and then iron them. Iron wrought muslins on soft flannel, ...
-Articles To Be Provided For Ironing
Provide the following articles: A woolen ironing-blanket, and a linen or cotton sheet to spread over it; a large fire, of charcoal and hard wood, (unless furnaces or stoves are used;) a hearth free fr...
-On Sprinkling, Folding, And Ironing
Wipe the dust from the ironing-board, and lay it down, to receive the clothes, which should be sprinkled with clear and warm water, and laid in separate piles, one of colored, one of common, and one o...
-To Whiten Articles, And Remove Stains From Them
Wet white clothes in suds, and lay them on the grass, in the sun. It will save from grass stain, to have a clean white cloth under the articles to be whitened. Lay muslins in suds made with white soap...
-Mixtures For Removing Stains And Grease
Stain Mixture Half an ounce of oxalic acid in a pint of soft water. This can be kept in a corked bottle and is infallible in removing iron-rust and ink-stains. It is very poisonous. The article must ...
-Chapter XXIII. Miscellaneous Advice And Recipes
How To Keep Cool In Hot Weather Sit in a room covered with matting or without any carpet, and keep the floor wet with pure water and a watering-pot. In hot nights, place a double wet sheet on the bed...
-Odds And Ends
There are certain odds and ends where every housekeeper will gain much by having a regular time to attend them. Let this time be the last Saturday forenoon in every month, or any other time more agree...
-Part Second. Chapter I. Needful Science And Training For The Family State
That women need as much and even more scientific and practical training for their appropriate business than men, arises from the fact that they must perform duties quite as difficult and important, an...
-Chapter II. A Healthful And Economical House
At the head of this chapter is a sketch of what may be properly called a Christian house; that is,a house contrived for the express purpose of enabling every member of a family to labor with the hands...
-A Healthful And Economical House. Part 2
The most healthful and comfortable mattress is made by a case, open in the centre and fastened together with buttons, as in Fig. 15; to be filled with oat straw, which is softer than wheat or rye. Thi...
-A Healthful And Economical House. Part 3
Fig. 20. Fig. 21. Fig.22. Fig. 23. Fig. 23 is the second or attic story. The main objection to attic rooms is their warmth in summer, owing to the heated roof. This is prevented by so enla...
-Chapter III. On Home Ventilation
When the wise woman buildeth her house, the first consideration will be the health of the inmates. The first and most indispensable requisite for health is pure air, both by day and night. If the p...
-On Home Ventilation. Part 2
This carbonic acid is formed by the union of oxygen with carbon or charcoal, which forms a large portion of the food. Watery vapor is also formed in the capillaries by the union of oxygen with the hyd...
-On Home Ventilation. Part 3
It is a terrible thing to reflect upon, that our northern winters last from November to May, six long months, in which many families confine themselves to one room, of which every window-crack has be...
-On Home Ventilation. Part 4
Some time since I visited an establishment where one hundred and fifty girls, in a single room, were engaged in needle-work. Pale-faced, and with low vitality and feeble circulation, they were uncons...
-Chapter IV. On Warming A Home
The laws that regulate the generation, diffusion, and preservation of heat as yet are a sealed mystery to thousands of young women who imagine they are completing a suitable education in courses of in...
-On Warming A Home. Part 2
A common mode of warming is by heated air from a furnace. The chief objection to this is the loss of moisture and of all radiated heat, and the consequent necessity of breathing air which is debilitat...
-On Warming A Home. Part 3
Thus the strong and healthy husband, feeling the want of pure air in the night, and knowing its importance, keeps windows open, and makes such draughts that the wife, who lives all day in a close room...
-On Warming A Home. Part 4
The next aim is, to arrange the conveniences of domestic labor so as to save time, and also to render such work less repulsive than it is made by common methods, so that children can be trained to lov...
-On Warming A Home. Part 5
* It is manufactured by N. M. Lowe, Boston, and sold by him and J. Queen & Co., Philadelphia. We will next notice the economy of time, labor, and expense secured by this cottage plan. The laundry wor...
-On Warming A Home. Part 6
Professor Bremer, of Yale College, states that 40 per cent. of moisture is needed to make air healthful. Now furnaces receive cold air containing little invisible moisture, and by heating: it a demand...
-Chapter V. On Stoves And Chimneys
The simplest mode of warming a house and cooking food is by radiated heat from fires; but this is the most wasteful method, as respects time, labor, and expense. The most convenient, economical, and l...
-On Stoves And Chimneys. Continued
Another contrivance is that of ventilating-holes in the front doors, through which fresh air is brought into the oven. This secures several purposes: it carries off the fumes of cooking meats, and pre...
-Chimneys
One of the most serious evils in domestic life is often found in chimneys that will not properly draw the smoke of a fire or stove. Although chimneys have been building for a thousand years, the artis...
-Chapter VI. Economic Modes Of Beautifying A Home
The educating influence of works of natural beauty and of art can hardly be overestimated. Surrounded by such suggestions of the beautiful, and such reminders of history and art, children are constant...
-Chapter VII. Care Of Health
There is no point where a woman is more liable to suffer from a want of knowledge and experience than in reference to the health of a family committed to her care. Many a young lady who never had any ...
-The Nervous System
There is another portion of the body which is so intimately connected with every other, that it is placed in this chapter as also having reference to every department in the general subject of the car...
-Chapter VIII. Domestic Exercise
In a work which aims to influence women to train the young to honor domestic labor and to seek healthful exercise in home pursuits, there is special reason for explaining the construction of the muscl...
-Chapter IX. Healthful Food And Drinks
The person who decides what shall be the food and drink of a family, and the modes of its preparation, is the one who decides, to a greater or less extent, what shall be the health of that family. It ...
-Healthful Food And Drinks. Part 2
Fig. 53. The proper digestion of food depends on the wants of the body, and on its power of appropriating the aliment supplied. The best of food can not be properly digested when it is not needed. ...
-Healthful Food And Drinks. Part 3
Fig. 54. The general rule, then, is, that three hours be given to the stomach for labor, and two for rest; and in obedience to this, live hours, at least, ought to elapse between every two regular ...
-Healthful Food And Drinks. Part 4
After taking a full meal, it is very important to health that no great bodily or mental exertion be made till the labor of the stomach is over. Intense mental effort draws the blood to the head, and m...
-Healthful Food And Drinks. Part 5
But this temporary invigoration of the system is always followed by a diminution of the powers of the stimulated organs; so that, though in all cases this reaction may not be perceptible, it is invari...
-Healthful Food And Drinks. Part 6
Carpenter, a standard writer on physiology, says the objection to a habitual use of even small quantities of alcoholic drinks is, that they are universally admitted to possess a poisonous character,...
-Healthful Food And Drinks. Part 7
The impression common in this country, that warm drinks, especially in winter, are more healthful than cold, is not warranted by any experience, nor by the laws of the physical system. At dinner cold ...
-Chapter X. Cleanliness
Both the health and comfort of a family depend, to a great extent, on cleanliness of the person and the family surroundings. True cleanliness of person involves the scientific treatment of the skin. T...
-Secreting Organs
Those vessels of the body which draw off certain portions of the blood and change it into a new form, to be employed for service or to be thrown out of the body, are called secreting organs. The skin ...
-Chapter XI. Clothing
There is no duty of those persons having control of a family where principle and practice are more at variance than in regulating the dress of young girls, especially at the most important and critica...
-Clothing. Part 2
Fig. 59. Fig. 60. Fig. 61. The other mode of filling the lungs is by abdominal breathing, as illustrated by Fig. 61. At D is a side view of the diaphragm in its natural position, and the dot...
-Clothing. Part 3
But this distortion brings upon woman peculiar distresses. The pressure of the whole superincumbent mass on the pelvic or lower organs induces sufferings proportioned in acuteness to the extreme delic...
-Chapter XII. Early Rising
There is no practice which has been more extensively-eulogized in. all ages than early rising; and this universal impression is an indication that it is founded on true philosophy. For it is rarely th...
-Chapter XIII. Domestic Manners
Good manners are the expressions of benevolence in personal intercourse, by which we endeavor to promote the comfort and enjoyment of others, and to avoid all that gives needless uneasiness. It is the...
-Domestic Manners. Part 2
Among those who make up aristocratic circles, such as are above them are deemed of superior, and such as are below of inferior, value. Thus, if a young, ignorant, and vicious coxcomb happens to have b...
-Domestic Manners. Part 3
But this power of nature and of religion, given to man as the controlling head, involves to him especially the distinctive duty of the family state, self-sacrificing love. The husband is to honor th...
-Domestic Manners. Part 4
Another topic, under this head, may be called table manners. To persons of good-breeding nothing is more annoying than violations of the conventional proprieties of the table. Reaching over another pe...
-Chapter XIV. The Preservation Of Good Temper In The Housekeeper
There is nothing which has a more abiding influence on the happiness of a family than the preservation of equable and cheerful temper and tones in the housekeeper. A woman who is habitually gentle, sy...
-The Preservation Of Good Temper In The Housekeeper. Continued
Another important rule is, to form all plans and arrangements in consistency with the means at command, and the character of those around. A woman who has a heedless husband, and young children, and i...
-Chapter XV. Habits Of System And Order
Any discussion of the equality of the sexes as to intellectual capacity seems frivolous and useless, both because it can never be decided, and because there would be no possible advantage in the decis...
-Habits Of System And Order. Part 2
It is also one of the plainest requisitions of Christianity, that we devote some of our time and efforts to the comfort and improvement of others. There is no duty so constantly enforced, both in the ...
-Habits Of System And Order. Part 3
In regard to the minutiae of family work, the writer has known the following methods to be adopted. Monday, with some of the best housekeepers, is devoted to preparing for the labors of the week. Any ...
-Habits Of System And Order. Part 4
It is equally important that young girls should be taught to do some species of handicraft that generally is done by men, and especially with reference to the frequent emigration to new territories wh...
-Chapter XVI. Health Of Mind
There is such an intimate connection between the body and mind, that the health of one can not be preserved without a proper care of the other. And it is from a neglect of this principle that some of ...
-Health Of Mind. Continued
There has been a most appalling amount of suffering, derangement, disease, and death, occasioned by a want of attention to this subject, in teachers and parents. Uncommon precocity in children is usua...
-Chapter XVII. Cake Of The Aged
One of the most interesting and instructive illustrations of the design of our Creator, in the institution of the family state, is the preservation of the aged after their faculties decay and usefulne...
-Chapter XVIII. The Care Of Domestic Animals
One of the most interesting illustrations of the design of our benevolent Creator in establishing the family state is the nature of the domestic animals connected with it. At the very dawn of life, th...
-The Care Of Domestic Animals. Part 2
Parasitic Vermin These are lice, fleas, ticks, the scale insects, and other pests which afflict our live stock. There are many ways of destroying them; the best and safest is a free use of carbolic a...
-The Care Of Domestic Animals. Part 3
Cows Gentle but firm treatment will make a cow easy to milk and to handle in every way. If stabled or yarded, cows should have access to water at all times, or have it frequently offered to them. Clo...
-The Care Of Domestic Animals. Part 4
Sheep In the winter, sheep need deep, well-littered, dry sheds, dry yards, and hay, wheat, or oat straw, as much as they will eat. They should be kept gaining by grain regularly fed to them, and so d...
-The Care Of Domestic Animals. Part 5
Bees But one of the most profitable as well as interesting kinds of business for a woman is the care of bees. In a recent agricultural report it is stated that one lady bought four hives for ten doll...
-Chapter XIX. Care Of The Sick
It is interesting to notice in the histories of our Lord the prominent place given to the care of the sick. When he first sent out the apostles, it was to heal the sick as well as to preach. Again, w...
-Care Of The Sick. Part 2
* The most effective mode of exercising the abdominal and respiratory muscles, in order to remedy constipation, is by a continuous alternate contraction of the muscles of the abdomen and diaphragm. By...
-Care Of The Sick. Part 3
Always prepare food for the sick in the neatest and most careful manner. It is in sickness that the senses of smell and taste are most susceptible of annoyance; and often, little mistakes or negligenc...
-Chapter XX. Fires And Lights
A shallow fire-place saves wood, and gives out more heat than a deeper one. A false back of brick may be put up in a deep fire-place. Hooks for holding up the shovel and tongs, a hearth-brush and bell...
-Stoves And Grates
Rooms heated by stoves should always have some opening for the admission of fresh air, or they will be injurious to health. The dryness of the air which they occasion should be remedied by placing a v...
-Lights
Professor Phin, of the Manufacturer and Builder, has kindly given us some late information on this important topic, which will be found valuable. In choosing the source of our light, the great points...
-To Make Candles
The nicest candles are those run in molds. For this purpose, melt together one quarter of a pound of white wax, one quarter of an ounce of camphor, two ounces of alum, and ten ounces of suet or mutton...
-Chapter XXI. On The Care Of Rooms
In selecting the furniture of parlors, some reference should be had to correspondence of shades and colors. Curtains should be darker than the walls; and, if the walls and carpets be light, the chairs...
-On The Care Of Breakfast And Dining Rooms
An eating-room should have in it a large closet, with drawers and shelves, in which should be kept all the articles used at meals. This, if possible, should communicate with the kitchen by a sliding w...
-On Setting Tables
Neat housekeepers observe the manner in which a table is set more than any thing else; and, to a person of good taste, few things are more annoying than to see the table placed askew; the table-cloth ...
-Rules For Setting A Table
1. Lay the rug square with the room, and also smooth and even; then set the table also square with the room, and see that the legs are in the right position to support the leaves. 2. Lay the table-cl...
-For Dinner
1. Place the rug, table, table-cloth, plates, knives and forks, and napkins, as before directed, with a tumbler by each plate. In cold weather, set the plates where they will be warmed. 2. Put the ca...
-On Waiting At Table
A domestic who waits on the table should be required to keep the hair and hands in neat order, and have on a clean apron. A small tea-tray should be used to carry cups and plates. The waiter should an...
-On Carving And Helping At Table
It is considered an accomplishment for a lady to know how to carve well at her own table. It is not proper to stand in carving. The carving-knife should be sharp and thin. To carve fowls (which should...
-On The Care Of Chambers And Bedrooms
Every mistress of a family should see not only that all sleeping-rooms in her house can be well ventilated at night, but that they actually are so. Where there is no open fireplace to admit the pure a...
-On Packing And Storing Articles
Fold a gentleman's coat thus: Lay it on a table or bed, the inside downward, and unroll the collar. Double each sleeve once, making the crease at the elbow, and laying them so as to make the fewest wr...
-On The Care Of The Kitchen, Cellar, And Store-Room
If parents wish their daughters to grow up with good domestic habits, they should have, as one means of securing this result, a neat and cheerful kitchen. A kitchen should always, if possible, be enti...
-On Washing Dishes
No item of domestic labor is so frequently done in a negligent manner by domestics as this. A full supply of conveniences will do much toward a remedy of this evil. A swab, made of strips of linen, ti...
-Rules For Washing Dishes
1. Scrape the dishes, putting away any food which may remain on them, and which it may be proper to save for future use. Put grease into the grease-pot, and whatever else may be on the plates, into th...
-Kitchen Furniture
Crockery Brown earthen pans are said to be best for milk and for cooking. Tin pans are lighter, and more convenient, but are too cold for many purposes. Tall earthen jars with covers are good to hold...
-Care Of The Cellar
A cellar should often be whitewashed, to keep it sweet. It should have a drain to keep it perfectly dry, as standing water in a cellar is a sure cause of disease in a family. It is very dangerous to l...
-Chapter XXII. The Care Of Yards And Gardens
First, let us say a few words on the Preparation of Soil. If the garden soil be Clayey and adhesive, put on a covering of sand, three inches thick, and the same depth of well-rotted manure. Spade it i...
-The Propagation Of Plants
This is an occupation requiring much attention and constant care. Bulbous roots are propagated by offsets; some growing on the top, others around the sides. Many plants are propagated by cutting off t...
-The Cultivation Of Fruit
By a little attention to this matter, a lady with the help of her children can obtain a rich abundance of all kinds of fruit. The writer has resided in families where little boys of eight, ten, and tw...
-Modes Of Preserving Fruit-Trees
Heaps of ashes or tanner's bark around peach-trees prevent the attack of the worm. The yellows is a disease of peach-trees, which is spread by the pollen of the blossom. When a tree begins to turn yel...
-Chapter XXIII. Sewing, Cutting, And Fitting
The customs of the American people are more conformed to those principles of the Christian family state which demand protecting care for the weaker members, than those of any other nation. Nowhere is ...
-Chapter XXIV. Accidents And Antidotes
Children should be taught the following modes of saving: life, health, and limbs in cases of sudden emergency, before a medical adviser can be summoned. In case of a common cut, bind the lips of the ...
-Chapter XXV. On The Right Use Of Time And Property
It is probable that there is no one direction in which conscientious persons suffer so much doubt and perplexity as on the right apportionment of time and property. Clear views of duty on this subject...
-On The Right Use Of Time And Property. Part 2
But Jesus Christ expressly discriminates, and explains that the great law of love (which, he says, it is the chief end of the law and the prophets to inculcate) is the voluntary love which consists ...
-On The Right Use Of Time And Property. Part 3
In gratifying the implanted desires of our nature, we are bound so to restrain ourselves, by reason and conscience, as always to seek the main objects of existence - the highest good of ourselves and ...
-On The Right Use Of Time And Property. Part 4
Instead, then, of the stagnation, both of industry and of benevolence, which would follow the universal and equable distribution of property, some men, by superior advantages of birth, or intellect, o...
-On The Right Use Of Time And Property. Part 5
There is no direction in which a true Christian economy of time and money is more conspicuous than in the style of living adopted in the family state. Those who build stately mansions, and lay out ex...
-On The Right Use Of Time And Property. Part 6
The results of our actions alone can never prove us deserving of blame. For men are often so placed that, owing to lack of intellect or means, it is impossible for them to decide correctly. To use all...
-On The Right Use Of Time And Property. Part 7
Another consideration relates to the indiscriminate bestowal of charity. Persons who have taken pains to inform themselves, and who devote their whole time to dispensing charities, unite in declaring ...
-Chapter XXVI. The Care Of Infants
The topic of this chapter may well be prefaced by an extract from Herbert Spencer on the treatment of offspring. He first supposes that some future philosophic speculator, examining the course of educ...
-The Care Of Infants. Part 2
But care must be taken to determine between the crying of pain or uneasiness, and the call for food; and the practice .of giving an infant food to stop its cries is often the means of increasing its ...
-The Care Of Infants. Part 3
Dress the infant so that it will be always warm, but not so as to cause perspiration. Be sure and keep its feet always warm; and for this often warm them at a fire, and use long dresses. Keep the neck...
-Chapter XXVII. The Management Of Young Children
In regard to the physical education of children, Dr. Clark, Physician in Ordinary to the Queen of England, expresses views on one point in which most physicians would coincide. He says: There is no g...
-The Management Of Young Children. Part 2
But it has not been so readily discerned that the same method is needful in order to form a habit of self-denial in doing good to others. It has been supposed that while children must be forced, by au...
-The Management Of Young Children. Part 3
The bad effects of this can be better appreciated by reference to one important principle of the mind. It is found to be universally true that, when any object of desire is put entirely beyond the rea...
-The Management Of Young Children. Part 4
In regard to the formation of habits of self-denial in child-hood, it is astonishing to see how parents who are very sensible often seem to regard this matter. Instead of inuring their children to thi...
-Chapter XXVIII. Family Religious Training
There are few women who have charge of servants or of children, in the family and school, who do not suffer anxiety and perplexity, and sometimes remorse, in attempts to perform their duty as chief mi...
-Family Religious Training. Part 2
Another, and the chief difficulty, is the fact that the great mass, even of educated minds, have never been trained to use the rules of language in the interpretation of the Bible as they do in common...
-Family Religious Training. Part 3
In like manner faith in Jesus Christ, who came in suffering and sorrow to tell of dangers in the unseen world, is proved by the way men live, If they have perfect faith in the dangers he reveals, then...
-Chapter XXIX. The Care Of Servants
In the chapter on the Might Use of Time and Property, the important explanation was made of the great law of love to God and to our neighbor, which includes in its aim and spirit all other laws. The d...
-The Care Of Servants. Part 2
It has been remarked in our armies that the men of cultivation, though bred in delicate and refined spheres, can bear up under the hardships of camp-life better and longer than rough laborers. The re...
-The Care Of Servants. Part 3
It is sometimes urged against domestics that they exact exorbitant wages. But what is the rule of rectitude on this subject? Is it not the universal law of labor and of trade that an article is to be ...
-The Care Of Servants. Part 4
It is a good rule, in reference to this point, to forewarn instead of finding fault. Thus, when a thing has been done wrong, let it pass unnoticed till it is to be done again; and then a simple reques...
-The Care Of Servants. Part 5
There is no domestic so good that she will not be injured by perceiving that, through dependence upon her, and a fear of losing her services, the mistress of the family gives up her proper authority a...
-Chapter XXX. Domestic Amusements And Social Duties
Whenever the laws of body and mind are properly understood, it will be allowed that every person needs some kind of recreation; and that, by seeking it, the body is strengthened, the mind is invigorat...
-Domestic Amusements And Social Duties. Part 2
The spirit of Christ is that of self-denying benevolence; and his great aim, by his teachings and example, was to train his followers to avoid all that should lead to sin, especially in regard to the ...
-Domestic Amusements And Social Duties. Part 3
There is need, also, that some men should keep a supervision of the current literature of the day, as guardians, to warn others of danger. For this purpose, it is more suitable for editors, clergymen,...
-Domestic Amusements And Social Duties. Part 4
Another domestic amusement is the collecting of shells, plants, and specimens in geology and mineralogy, for the formation of cabinets. If intelligent parents would procure the simpler works which hav...
-Domestic Amusements And Social Duties. Part 5
There are husbands and fathers who conscientiously subtract time from their business to spend at home, in reading with their wives and children, and in domestic amusements which at once refresh and im...
-Chapter XXXI. Laws Of Health And Happiness
It is hoped a day will come when these laws of God will be put on tablets in school-rooms and houses, as are the ten commandments in our churches, and that all children will be trained fully to unders...
-Chapter XXXII. Comfort For A Discouraged Housekeeper
There is no doubt of the fact, that American housekeepers have far greater trials and difficulties to meet than those of any other nation. And it is probable that many of those who may read over the m...
-Comfort For A Discouraged Housekeeper. Continued
Are you not only a housekeeper, but a mother? Oh, sacred and beautiful name! how many cares and responsibilities are associated with it! And how many elevating and sublime anticipations and hopes are ...
-Note A. Views Of Medical Writers
The American Woman's Educational Association has for its object the establishment of institutions having endowed departments supporting ladies of superior character and education who shall add to a c...
-Treatment Of Pelvic Diseases
The pelvic organs, when diseased, all have so many symptoms in common, that it requires not only good anatomical, pathological, and physiological knowledge, but close and well-cultivated diagnostic p...
-Effects Of Imagination In Reference To These Diseases
Besides the evils of misunderstanding and mistreating these affections, we have a host of evils from the effects of imagination. Multitudes of women, who hear terrific accounts of the nature of these...
-Peculiar Instruction Needed By Young Children
Through information gained from my husband, from other physicians, from teachers, from medical writers, and from the reports of insane hospitals, it has become clear to my mind that there are secret ...
-Instructions At A More Mature Age
You wish my views and experience in reference to instructions that should be communicated to the young, on such topics, at a more mature age. The terrible effects I have seen from simple ignorance,...
-Valuable Standard Works For Public And Private Libraries
Published By Harper & Brothers, New York. For a full List of Books suitable for Libraries, see Harper & Brothers' Trade-List and Catalogue, which may be had gratuitously on application to the Pub-Ush...
-Standard Works For Public And Private Libraries. Part 2
Baldwin's Pre-Historic Nations Pre-Historic Nations; or, Inquiries concerning some of the Great Peoples and Civilizations of Antiquity, and their Probable Relation to a still Older Civilization of th...
-Standard Works For Public And Private Libraries. Part 3
Livingstone's South Africa Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa; including a Sketch of Sixteen Years' Residence in the Interior of Africa, and a Journey from the Cape of Good Hope to Loa...









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