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The New Cyclopaedia of Domestic Economy, and Practical Housekeeper | by Elizabeth Fries Ellet



Adapted to all classes of society and comprising subjects connected with the interests of every family; such as domestic education, houses, furniture, duties of mistress, duties of domestics, the storeroom, marketing, table and attendance, care and training of children, care of the sick, preparation of food for children and invalids, preservation of health, domestic medicine, the art of cookery, perfumery, the toilet, cosmetics, and five thousand practical receipts and maxims from the best english, french, german, and american sources.

TitleThe New Cyclopaedia of Domestic Economy, and Practical Housekeeper
AuthorElizabeth Fries Ellet
PublisherHenry Bill
Year1872
Copyright1871, Henry Bill
AmazonThe New Cyclopaedia of Domestic Economy, and Practical Housekeeper

Illustrated With Over Two Hundred Engravings.

Edited By Irs. E. F. Ellet, Author Of "The Women Of The Revolution," Etc., Etc.

The New Cyclopaedia Of Domestic Economy And Practi 1T. SINCLAIR & SONS DIHPHILA

T. Sinclair & Sons Dihphila.

-Preface
The importance of the subjects introduced, and their influence upon the happiness of the household, constitute a sufficient claim for a favorable reception of this volume; for, though many books have ...
-Part I. Thoughts And Maxims On Housekeeping. Chapter I
Dr. Stark says, The only test of the utility of knowledge is its promotion of the happiness of mankind. Viewed thus, the subject we are about to treat presents claims superior to most others, and is...
-Chapter II. The Dwelling-House
That sensible and oft-quoted old lady, Mrs. Glasse, begins one of her recipes thus: First catch your hare. Following so good an example, we will first take a house and furnish it, before laying down...
-Chapter III. Kitchen Furniture
Here again the unsentimental consideration of dollars and cents obtrudes itself. The limit to which we can go is dependent upon the funds in hand which may be expended without incurring debt or causin...
-Pictures On The Wall
Pictures, if well chosen, add much to the appearance of a room, and impart to it an air of completeness, and a home look, which many people know how to appreciate. To produce this effect, the subjects...
-Chapter IV. Linen And Plate
With regard to all those articles which fall under the general denomination of plate, we should advise that all imitations be avoided; let those who cannot afford silver be content to use simple met...
-Chapter V. Servants
Supposing now that we have our house, and it is furnished, the next thing to determine is how many servants can be afforded. Must we be content with one, a general house-servant; or can we afford a ...
-Servants. Continued
In all large establishments in England the men and women servants, in the intervals of their employments, are never allowed to sit in the same room, but have their separate places of resort, assemblin...
-Chapter VI. Housekeeping Accounts
As a country cannot be governed without laws, neither can a household; and the mistress should be as absolute in her own house as a sovereign in her dominions. Order and regularity are the key-stones ...
-Housekeeping Accounts. Part 2
Every housekeeper should keep a strict account of all her expenditures; should see that each bill is receipted when paid; should file all receipts, and keep them for a year at least - we should rather...
-Housekeeping Accounts. Part 3
Besides the benefit a woman derives in her health and person from attention to all matters relative to personal care, she will gain another in the effect of her example upon her dependants; for we are...
-Housekeeping Accounts. Part 4
Our model housewife believes with us that we should endeavor a Well ordered home, man's best delight, to make; And by submissive wisdom, modest skill, With every gentle, care-eluding art, To raise...
-Housekeeping Accounts. Part 5
Those who would give dinner parties, must, generally speaking, if their menage is small, hire a professed cook. A small, well cooked, well chosen dinner, is far preferable to a table crowded with dish...
-Chapter VII. Daily Work
Few persons would believe what a waste of money and property arises simply from want of care. We cannot, of course, expect this carefulness from ser vants, from those who are often thought less, inexp...
-Daily Work. Continued
Feather Duster. The breakfast is then to be prepared the cloth laid, the breakfast service properly arranged, the ham or eggs, or whatever it may be, cooked, the toast,made, the butter set in clear...
-Chapter VIII. The Nursery
Among the many duties a woman is called upon to fulfil, surely none can be deemed of such paramount importance as those she owes to her children. Now it is by no means our intention to write a chapter...
-The Nursery. Continued
There is no occasion to teach children to walk; when they are strong enough, they will invariably find out the proper use of their feet; let them lie on the floor, and then sit, and then crawl; and by...
-Chapter IX. Care Of The Sick
Another duty, of great importance, devolves on woman; namely - the care of the sick. From the highest to the lowest none are, properly speaking, exempt from this charge. 'Tis true that those who are r...
-Chapter X. The Store-Room And Marketing
It must be borne in mind that an inventory of furniture, linen, and china should be kept, and the things examined by it twice a year, or oftener if there be a change of servants; the articles used by ...
-Marketing
Although respectable butchers may, in most cases, be relied upon for the goodness of the meat which they sell to regular customers, yet many persons (both ladies and gentlemen) go to market and choose...
-How To Choose Fish
Fish In every sort of fish, stiffness, redness of the gills, and brightness of the eyes, are invariable signs of freshness; thickness of the flesh generally marks the good condition of all fish, and ...
-Chapter XI. Domestic Manipulation
Under the head of Domestic Manipulation, we propose giving a series of articles on the numerous and essential manual operations that are constantly required in every family, and which, whether they ar...
-Cutting, Grinding, And Writing On Glass
We have described the most advantageous modes of extracting fixed stoppers from decanters, etc. It is possible that some of our readers may have followed our advice sufficiently well to have succeeded...
-Chapter XII. Decanting, Straining, And Filtering Of Liquids
The decanting of liquids is, under ordinary circumstances, an operation sufficiently simple to require no explanation; but the ease and certainty with which it can be performed, depend entirely upon t...
-Decanting, Straining, And Filtering Of Liquids. Continued
Fig. 4. If a syphon is required frequently for decanting the same kind of liquid, it is found troublesome to be constantly filling it before each time of using; this trouble is obviated by the use ...
-Chapter XIII. The Manufacture And Use Of Cements
The term cement, includes all those substances employed for the purpose of causing the adhesion of two or more bodies, whether originally separate, or divided by an accidental fracture. As the substan...
-Chapter XIV. Dividing, Powdering, Grinding, Etc
The operations of chopping, powdering, grinding, etc, are so frequently required in cooking, and the other branches of domestic economy, as to render any description of their utility wholly unnecessar...
-Chapter XV. Knots, Packages, Parcels, Etc
The poet Crabbe, speaking of the writing of the rustics, signing his parish registers, says - Tis strange that men Who guide the plough should fail to guide the pen 1 For half, a mile the furrows ev...
-Chapter XVI. What We Eat
In spite of our receipts and our philosophy, the briskness of the fire, the skill of our cook, the excellence of the oven, the bright array of pots, kettles, pans, moulds, griddles and gridirons, and ...
-What We Eat. Continued
Coffee-making is a more intricate affair, and cannot be fully conveyed in a receipt. The coffee must be slowly roasted, not burnt, and brought only to an amber brown; it must be roasted day by day, an...
-Chapter XVII. Boiling, Stewing, Etc
From considering the properties of hard and soft water, we pass by a natural transition to the employment of that liquid in culinary operations. In practice, nothing can at first sight appear more sim...
-Chapter XVIII. Economy Of Heat
Perhaps few of our readers are aware of the extraordinary wastefulness of our usual processes for obtaining artificial heat; at the most moderate computation, seven-eighths of the warmth produced by a...
-Economy Of Heat. Continued
Fig. 2. For the domestic use of gas in heating we believe there is no contrivance so useful as the following:- A circular hole, from two to four or more inches in diameter, is cut in the dresser, thr...
-Chapter XIX. Cleaning And Disinfecting
We have elsewhere given directions as to the best mode of cleaning various articles, such as bottles, glass, etc. What remains, therefore, under this head, is to furnish hints for cleaning miscellaneo...
-Cleaning And Disinfecting. Continued
Downy and fibrous materials readily receive infection; it may, in fact, in many instances, be folded up in them, and so retained almost any length of time; but if they are thoroughly exposed to a free...
-Chapter XX. Fermenting And Distilling
In ordinary language, the term fermentation is employed to signify the peculiar changes which take place when a solution of sugar, or any vegetable substance containing saccharine matter, is converted...
-Chapter XXI. Laying Out Tables And Folding Napkins
The art of laying out a table, whether for breakfast, luncheon, dinner, tea or supper, consists in arranging the various dishes, plate, glass, etc, methodically, and adhering to the rules we are about...
-Dinners
Dinners The appearance a dinner-table presents does not depend so much upon a profuseness of viands, as upon the neatness, cleanliness, and well-studied arrangement of the whole. Taste, if well direc...
-Dinners. Part 2
The first course generally consists of soups and fish, which are removed by the roasts, stews, etc. of the second course. The second course, when there are three, consists of roasts and stews for the...
-Dinners. Part 3
Liqueurs are handed round when sweets are on the table. Sauces are handed round in the sauce-boat, and when served placed on the side-board or dinner returned to the table. Sweet sauces are handed rou...
-Chapter XXII. Trussing And Carving
Poultry The feathers must be plucked as soon as possible after killing-and the down singed off with lighted paper, the crop emptied by a slit cut in the back of the neck, the vent opened to clean out...
-Carving
Ladies ought especially to make carving a study; at their own houses, they grace the table, and should be enabled to perform the task allotted to them with sufficient skill to prevent remark or the ca...
-Carving. Part 2
Aitch-bone of Beet. Bibs Of Beef Cut along the whole length of the bone, from end to end, a to b, either commencing in the centre or at one side, having the thin end towards you; but if cut from t...
-Carving. Part 3
Cut the joints into chops and serve them separately; or cut slices the whole length of the loin; or run the knife along the chine-bone, and then slice it, the fat and lean together, as shown in the cu...
-Carving. Part 4
Boiled Rabbit. Boiled Rabbits The legs and shoulders should be first taken off and then the back cut across into two parts, which is easily done by a bend of the knife in the joint underneath, abo...
-Chapter XXIII. Culinary Utensils
The various utensils used for the pre paration and keeping of food are made * For the cuts in this chapter, and for the engrav-ings of house-keeping utensils throughout the book either of metal, glas...
-Culinary Utensils. Part 2
The fixtures or fittings of a kitchen depend upon the builder, and in modern houses sufficient attention is paid to the situations of the range, dresser, larder, etc, to embody convenience. In furn...
-Culinary Utensils. Part 3
Knife Sharpeners. Oyster Broiler, or Toast Gridiron. Corkscrews. Cucumber and Vegetable Slicer. Saucepan Digester The great importance of the digester, not only to poor families, but to the...
-Chapter XXIV. Cookery
Liebig, in his work onThe Chemistry of Food, says: Among all the arts known to man, there is none that enjoys a juster appreciation, and the products of which are more universally admired, than tha...
-Chapter XXV. A Glossary Of Foreign Terms Used In Cookery
French cookery is of so diverse a nature that many volumes have already been written upon the subject; and new modes of dressing the same things are so constantly being invented, that we must content ...
-Chapter XXVI. Condiments
There is one class of materials in constant use in the kitchen:- the condiments; without these, soups, sauces, and all made dishes, would be insipid; and the judicious application of them is essential...
-Condiments. Part 2
This tree bears a fruit similar in shape to the acorn, but smaller. It has neither smell nor taste; but, boiled in water, yields an oil which, on becoming cold, is as hard as tallow: it is used as an ...
-Condiments. Part 3
Chervil is getting more into use every day; its flavor is exceedingly pleasant, and can be employed in soups and salads, especially in made dishes, with the greatest advantage. Capers are the buds of...
-Condiments. Part 4
Sugar is the concentrated juice of a plant which grows in hot climates, and is also to be obtained from other trees and vegetables, especially from beet-root. It is used very extensively in cookery, i...
-Chapter XXVII. Rudiments Of Cookery
A few simple general directions, on a subject of so much importance to family and individual comfort as cooking, will be found useful, even though there be some repetition in subsequent instructions. ...
-Rudiments Of Cookery. Part 2
The sauces sent to table with boiled meat must be served in boats, not poured over it. Boasting The first preparation must be to see that the spit is cleaned with sand and water. It should be wiped ...
-Rudiments Of Cookery. Part 3
The Skimmings of Soups and Gravies - called top-pot, - is used by French cooks with flour, to thicken gravies and soups, and by some for frying. French Cooking French cooks subject their meats to ...
-Rudiments Of Cookery. Part 4
Be careful that the fat or oil is fresh, clean, and free from salt, else what you fry in it will be of bad color and flavor; salt will prevent it from browning. Fat or oil, to be used again, should b...
-Chapter XXVIII. Hints And Maxims
If you chance to occupy the important position of a cook, remember that cleanliness is the first, second and third requisite in point of importance, to be observed. Keep your flour-box, sugar, salt, ...
-Hints And Maxims. Continued
Buffaloes' tongues should soak a day and a night, and boil six hours. Molasses used in cooking should be first boiled and skimmed. One or two gallons may be thus prepared at a time. It is a prodigiou...
-Chapter XXIX. Articles In Season For Each Month
January Fish, - Eels, flounders, haddocks, lampreys, oysters, whitings, clams, muscles, striped bass, salt mackerel, smoked salmon, sardines, anchovies, fish pickled and soused. Meats Beef, mutton,...
-Part Second. Receipts. Soups
There is no dish, perhaps, that comes to table which gives such general satisfaction as well prepared soup; let the appetite be vigorous or delicate, an excellent soup will always prove grateful to it...
-2.- Brown Stock
Put ten pounds of shin of beef, six pounds of knuckle of veal, and some sheep's-trotters or a cow-heel, in a closely covered stewpan, with very little water to draw out the gravy very gently, and allo...
-3. - Brown Gravy Soup
The meat used for making this soup should be quite fresh, and of the common gravy beef; if the shin be used, break the bones, as the marrow will add to its richness. Take seven to eight pounds of the...
-4. - Soyer's Stock For All Kinds Of Soup
Procure a knuckle of veal about six pounds in weight, which cut into pieces about the size of an egg, as also half a pound of lean ham or bacon; then rub a quarter of a pound of butter upon the bottom...
-6. - Soyer's Brown Gravies
Rub an ounce of butter over the bottom of a stewpan capable of holding about three quarts; have ready peeled four onions, cut them into thick slices, with which cover the bottom of the stewpan; over t...
-7. - Soyer's Glaze
Is an almost indispensable article in a cuisine bourgeoise, and should be kept by all persons in the middle classes of life, the advantage being that it will keep for months together, is very simple t...
-9. - Portable Soup
There are many advantages connected with this soup, which will present themselves to the lady housekeeper, its constant readiness for use, its forming an excellent stock for gravies, sauces, or soups;...
-11. - White Portable Soup
Procure as fine a leg of veal as can be obtained, bone it, remove the whole of the skin and fat, chop in pieces two dozen fowls' feet, wash them well, put them into a large iron kettle with three gall...
-19.- Jenny Lind's Soup
Soyer says: This is the soup invented and often partaken of by the celebrated cantatrice of the name it bears, who partook of it every day when on a visit to the talented authoress, Mrs. Anna Maria Ha...
-21. - French Pot-Au-Feu
Out of this earthen pot comes the favorite soup and bouilli, which has been everlastingly famed as having been the support of several generations of all classes of society in France; from the opulent ...
-22. - White Soup
Take a large scrag or a knuckle of veal, and one-half pound of lean ham; some blades of mace and a piece of un-grated nutmeg, sliced onions, and heads of celery, with a little salt and an equal quanti...
-26. - To Make Family Soup
Take a shin or leg of beef, that has been newly killed; the fore-leg is best, as there is the most meat on it. Have it cut into three pieces, and wash it well. To each pound allow somewhat less than a...
-28. - Scotch Kail
Is chiefly made of mutton, either fresh or salted; beef is only used when mutton cannot conveniently be had. Three or four pounds of meat should be put into a gallon of cold water, along with a modera...
-29. - Cock-A-Leekie. Cocky-Leeky
Or as in Scotland called cocky-leeky - is there also a very ancient dish, and is recorded to have been a special favorite of James I. It is made thus:- Stew a large fowl, a marrow-bone, and two or ...
-32. - Soyer's Mulligatawny Soup
Cut up a small knuckle of veal, which put into a stewpan, with a piece of butter, half a pound of lean ham, a carrot, a turnip, three onions, and six apples, add half a pint of water; set the stewpan ...
-33. - Scotch Broth
Set on the fire four ounces of pearl-barley, with three Scotch pints (or six quarts) of salt water; when it boils skim it, and add what quantity of salt beef or fresh brisket you choose, and a marrowb...
-35. - Pepper-Pot Hotch Potch
To three quarts of water put vegetables according to the season. In summer, peas. French beans, cauliflowers, lettuce, and spinach; in winter, beet-root and endive* carrots, turnips, celery, and onion...
-50. - Baked Soups
Take a pound of any lean meat and cut it into dice, place in an earthen jar, or pot, that will hold five quarts of liquid. Slice, and add to it, two onions, two carrots, two ounces of rice washed and ...
-53. - Potage A La Reine
Is so called from its having been said to be a favorite soup at the table of Her Majesty. Stew two or three young fowls for about an hour in good fresh-made veal broth: then take them out, skin them,...
-60.- Turtle Soup
Hang up the turtle by the hind fins, cut off the head, and allow it to drain. Cut off the fore fins; separate the callipash (upper shell) from the callipee (under shell), beginning at the hind fins. ...
-61. - Mock Turtle
Half a calf's head will be quite sufficient, even if it be small, to provide soup enough for a moderate party, as it will fill a tureen of two quarts; but it must be fresh and unstripped of the skin, ...
-62. - Neat's Feet Soup
Take two neat's feet, cut them as you do a calf's head: take five pints of any sort of broth, the juice and rind of one lemon, some parsley and herbs chopped fine; send these to the oven; when it come...
-63. - La Tortue-Turtle Soup. (Ude's Receipt, Most Carefully Revised.)
This soup will be made with less difficulty if you cut off the head of the turtle the preceding day. In the morning open the turtle: which is done by leaning heavily with your knife on the shell of t...
-64. - Mock Turtle, English Fashion
Take a calf's head very white and very fresh, bone the nose part of it; put the head into some warm water to discharge the blood; squeeze the flesh with your hand, to ascertain that it is all out. Min...
-65. - The Garbure, With Brown Bread
Take a knuckle of ham, perfectly sweet a knuckle of veal, and about six pounds of flank of beef, which put into a pan, with an onion stuck with two cloves, a few carrots, etc.; pour over the above two...
-66. - Potage A La Reine-(Queen Soup.) (Ude's New Receipt.)
For twelve people take three fat chickens or pullets, which are generally cheaper and better than fowls: skin them, take out the lungs, wash them clean, and put them in a pah with a bunch of parsley o...
-68. - Mock Turtle Soup
This soup, if well made, gives general satisfaction. Take a calf's head, thoroughly scraped and cleaned, the skin remaining on; place it in a soup pot; to this add that part of the hand of pickled por...
-69. - Mock Turtle Soup
Blanch half a calf's head sufficiently to draw out the bones; cut off the ear and the tongue; take off the skin of the tongue, lay all separate until cold, and strain off the liquor, and add it to you...
-77. - Vegetable Soups
Although many of the following soups are made purely of vegetables, yet some - and those generally the best - are made on a foundation of some sort of meat-broth in which the roots are stewed. The br...
-94. - Leek, Or Onion Soup
The liquor in which a leg of mutton has been boiled will do very well for this broth. Mix a spoonful or two of oatmeal, according to the quantity of broth, in cold water, very smooth, the same as if f...
-104. - Stock for Fish Soup
Take a dozen flounders, or any small flat fish, and the same number of perch; gut and clean them carefully; put them-into a stewpan with two quarts of strong veal-broth; add. a few slices of lean ham,...
-119. - Salt And Fresh-Water Fish
When boiling fish put a little salt and a little vinegar into the water to give the fish firmness. Be careful to let fish be well done, but not to let it break. When very fresh, cod and whiting are ve...
-120. - Marinade
Is commonly used in France for the purpose of boiling fish, which imbibes from it a more pleasant flavor than it naturally possesses, and has been so generally adopted by professed cooks that we here ...
-123. - Cod Fish With Oyster Sauce
Boil three slices of the fish as above, drain and dress them upon a dish without a napkin, blanch three dozen oysters, by putting them into a stewpan, with their juice, upon the fire, move them round ...
-140. - Herrings
Herrings are dressed in a variety of fashions; they are fried, boiled, broiled, dried, potted, baked, smoked pickled. There are three sorts of herrings, fresh, salted, and red herrings; they are clea...
-144. - To Stew Mackeeel-(New Way.)
Take off the heads, the fins, the tails, and, having opened the fish, and taken out all the hard roes, dry them with a cloth, and dredge them lightly with flour; place three or four of them in a stewp...
-146. - Mackerel
Cleanse the fish thoroughly inside and out, remove the roe carefully, steep it in vinegar and water, and replace it; place the fish in water from which the chill has been taken, and boil very slowly, ...
-174. - Turbot A La Creme
Is made from the remains of a turbot left from a previous dinner: pick all the flesh from the bones, which warm in salt and water, and have ready the following sauce: put one ounce of flour into a ste...
-175. - Crimped Salmon - A La Creme
The salmon, like cod, must be quite fresh or it will not crimp. Cut the body into slices about two inches thick; have ready some salt and water in the proportion of three ounces of salt to a quart of ...
-176. - To Boil Salmon. (Frank Forrester's Own Receipt.)
If you are ever so lucky as to catch a salmon, where incontinently you can proceed to cook him - that is to say, in the wilderness, within ten yards of the door of your own shantee, with the fire burn...
-191. - Collared Eels
The eels destined to be dressed as above should be the finest which can be selected: the skin must not be removed, but, the bone must be carefully and cleverly extracted. Spread out the fish, and with...
-193. - Shell Fish
Although crabs and lobsters may be bought the whole year round, they are yet only in high season, from the month of July till the close of October. They should be always purchased alive. If lobsters ...
-199. - To Boil Lobsters
Put them alive, with their claws tied together, into the water when boiling hot, and keep it so until the fish' is done, which, if of a pound weight, will take about a quarter of an hour, and if large...
-207. - Lobster Salad. - (Soyer's.)
Dress a border of hard-boiled eggs, as directed in salad of game, fill the centre with some nice fresh salad, then take the flesh from a middling-sized lobster, which cut into as large slices as possi...
-213. - Crab
Though not so well-known as the lobster, is looked upon by many as being a better-flavored fish, and perhaps rather more digestible. The female is considered inferior to the male, and may be known by ...
-215. - To Stew Crabs
Pick the meat carefully out of a large crab and its claws; cut into small pieces, mix it with about a fourth part of breadcrumbs, and a very small quantity of finely shred parsley. Season it well, and...
-241. - Casserole Of Fish
Is a title given, among others, by French cooks, to poisson rechauffe, or fish which has been left after being dressed, and is meant to be re-heated. There are almost as many modes of doing this, a...
-243. - Fish Pate
This is a pretty mode of enclosing a fricassee of fish with a potato wall without a crust of pastry. Mash in a mortar as many potatoes as you may want, with a good piece of butter; then, with the bowl...
-245. - Fish-Cutlets
Chop a considerable quantity of herbs with a small piece of shalot, season it with pepper and salt, and put it into a stewpan with two ounces of butter; as the butter is melting add a teaspoonful of e...
-276. - Lobster Sauce
Pick the meat from a lobster and cut it into small pieces. Break the shell, and stew it with the legs, etc, in a pint and a half of water, until reduced to the quantity required; then strain; add flou...
-Gravy, Sauces, Etc
There is nothing that requires more attention on the part of the cook than the sauces which are wanted to all made dishes. Where a calf's head or a breast of veal is stewed, nothing more will be requi...
-278. - Stock For Gravy
A good mode of making stock for gravies is to cut lean beef thin, put it into a gravy pot without any butter or fat, and set it on a fire covered, but take care it does not burn; let it stay till all ...
-286. - Curry Powders
One ounce of ginger, the same of coriander-seed, one-half ounce of cayenne pepper, and two ounces of fine pale turmeric; these ingredients to be pounded separately to a fine powder, and then warmed by...
-290. - The Aspic, A Jelly
Take a handful of aromatic herbs, such as burnet, chervil, and tarragon. Boil them in white vinegar; when the vinegar is well scented, pour into the stewpan some consomme of fowl reduced; season well ...
-295. - Melted Butter
Although it may be presumed that every cook who understands her business knows how to melt butter, it is yet constantly brought to table either too thick or too thin, and not unfrequently filled with ...
-308. - Mushroom Sauce
White Put the mushrooms into a stewpan with one ounce of butter, some pepper and salt, and squeeze over them the juice of half a lemon; set them over the fire; when they have given out their liquor, ...
-343. - Sauces For Roast Fowls
Stew any moderate quantity of ham, veal, and mushrooms, with sweet herbs, a shalot, a little allspice, and a piece of butter, until all become brown; then let the whole simmer gently for a long time i...
-344. - White Sauce
It is seldom necessary to buy meat for this favorite sauce, as the proportion of that flavor is but small. The water that has boiled fowls, veal, or rabbit, or a little broth that may be in the house,...
-358. - White Sauce. (Soyer's.)
Cut and chop a knuckle of veal weigh- ing about four pounds, into large dice; also half a pound of lean bacon; butler the bottom of a large stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter; add tw...
-359. - Brown Sauce. (Soyer's.)
Put two ounces of butter into a stewpan; rub it over the bottom; peel two or three large onions; cut them in thick slices; lay them on the bottom; cut into small pieces about two pounds of knuckle of ...
-360. - Demi-Glaze-Thin Brown Sauce for Made Dishes
When I have a small dinner-party, I always, as I told you before, make small quantities of white and brown sauce as above, but this is a nice way of clarifying a brown sauce without much trouble, and ...
-373. - Curey Sauce. (Soyer's.)
Put into a pan four good-sized onions, sliced, and two peeled apples, with a quarter of a pound of butter, the same of lean, ham, a blade of mace, four peppercorns, two bay-leaves, two sprigs of thyme...
-379. - A Very Good And Useful White Sauce-(Quite New.)
Put a quart of white sauce in a stew-pan of a proper size on a fire; stir continually until reduced to one-third; put two yolks of eggs in a basin, stir them well up, add your sauce gradually, keep st...
-382. - Brown Sharp Sauce, Or Poi-Vrade. - (French Receipt.)
Put a small bit of butter, a small carrot cut into dice, a few shalots cut in the same way, some parsley roots, six green onions, some parsley, a few slices of ham, a clove, a little thyme, the half o...
-388. - A L'Espagnole - (Or Spanish Sauce.)
Besides a few slices of ham and veal, put into a stewpan any remains which you may have of poultry and game, and let them boil for one hour in water more than sufficient to cover them; after which ski...
-400. - Chetney And Quihi Sauce. -
Take eight ounces of sharp apples pared and cored, eight ounces of tomatoes, eight ounces of salt, eight ounces of brown sugar, eight ounces of raisins, four ounces of red chilis, four ounces of ginge...
-401. - Veal Gravy, Or Blond of Veal. (Ude.)
Put a few slices of Westmoreland ham (the lean only) into a pretty thick stewpan, and lay over them some fleshy pieces of veal. The rump may be used. Pour into the stewpan a sufficient quantity of sto...
-406. - Veloute, Or Bechamel, A New Method. (Ude.)
Put into a stewpan a knuckle of veal, some slices of ham, four or five pounds of beef, the legs and loin of a fowl; all the trimmings of meat or game that you have, and moisten with boiled water suffi...
-Ketchups. 413. - Mushroom Ketchup
Take the full grown flaps of mushrooms, wipe them clean, crash them with the hands, throw in a handful of salt with every peck of mushrooms, and let them stand all night; then put them into stewpans, ...
-414. - Walnut Ketchup
Take six half-sieves of green walnut-shells, put them into a tub, mix them up well with common salt, (from two to three pounds,) let them stand for six days, frequently beating and mashing them; by th...
-422. - Quenelle
This is one of the most delicate preparations of forcemeat that we have, and requires practice, care and attention to make it in perfection. It is called according to the meat of which it is composed;...
-424. - Forcemeat
Take equal quantities of cold chicken, veal, and beef, shred very small, and mixed together; season, at the same time, with a moderate quantity of pepper, salt, sweet herbs, and grated nutmeg - that i...
-434. - Forcemeat Balls For Soup Maigre
Forcemeat balls for maigre soups of any description should be always used to compensate for the savor of which they are deprived by the want of meat-broth; and may be made of fish and sweet herbs, or ...
-439. - Farce Of Veal Or Fowl
Cut up a fowl, or some veal, form the fillet into small dice, cut in the same quantity of good fat ham cut small, and a few truffles, a little parsley, shalots, and a little of all kinds of fine sweet...
-Beef
Beef is dressed in various ways all the year round; but, for roasting, the best season is from November to the end of March. For joints, the only really good roasting pieces are-the sirloin and the lo...
-450. - Sirloin Of Beef Roasted
Break the upper part of the chine bones, cut them out, and cut through the strong gristle on the top about an inch apart, and skewer it in its place, which will prevent its drawing up or looking unsig...
-452. - To Dress The Inside Of A Cold Sirloin
Cut out all the meat, and a little fat, into pieces as thick as your finger, and four inches long; dredge them with flour, and fry in butter of a nice brown: drain the butter from the meat, and toss i...
-458. - To Stew Beef
It should be put down in a pot with just sufficient cold water to cover the meat, and closely covered After boiling three or four hours, according to the size of the piece, cut in small pieces, not la...
-459. - Rump Of Beef Stew
Half roast it; then put it into a pot with three pints of water, a pound of sliced bacon, a bunch of sweet herbs, two wine-glasses of vinegar, and a bottle of cider or small wine; stick cloves into a ...
-463. - Bouilli
The rump of beef is best for this purpose, as the meat is to be served up in a separate dish, and will make a finely flavored sort of soup. Take as much of it as may be thought necessary; but for a sm...
-465. - Broiling
The cook must prepare her fire in due time. When ready, it should be clear and bright, so clear from black coal and smoke that the chop or steak may come from the gridiron without blemish or taint of ...
-472. - Palates Of Beef
Four white skinned palates; if for a white dish lay them all night in salt and water, wash them well, put them on to scald, take off all the skin, then put them into your stock pot, let them boil seve...
-481. - Tongue Larded
This when well cooked is especially pleasant to some palates. Take a tongue which has been pickled, a small one is the best, cut off the root, and put it into a pan; cover it with water, and let it bo...
-484. - Spiced Beef
A joint from the round, rump, or flank, from ten to fourteen pounds, is the usual weight of the piece intended to be thus dressed. Make a mixture of the following ingredients, and let them be we...
-485. - A Pickle For Beef
To one gallon of water put two pounds and a half of common salt, one ounce of saltpetre, half a pound of coarse sugar, boil it for a quarter of an hour, and be particular while boiling to remove every...
-491. - Baked Beef
A Bump Of Twenty To Twenty-Five Pounds Weight Take two ounces each of pepper and allspice; one ounce of pounded cloves, and the same quantity of mace; rub this all over the joint which should be hung...
-496. - Ox-Tails
Cut the tails in pieces; lay them in a stewpan, with butter and a large onion; set them over a smart fire to make them brown; peel and boil a couple of dozen of button onions in about three pints of w...
-497. - Tripe
. Tripe may be dressed in several ways, but whatever mode may be employed, it will always be found an improvement to soak it for a whole night in milk. Some say, seven or eight days in salt and water....
-513. - The Bath Receipt
Take three pounds of the rump, or any part of the beef which will stew well; trim it nicely, and cut off all the fat. Chop all sorts of sweet herbs together very finely, with a little shalot and a gre...
-520. - Beef A La Mode
There are several methods of making this dish; the hash erroneously termed alamode beef, sold at eating-houses, is a very different dish to the true beef a la mode. The following is called the old Ba...
-521. - Beef A La Mode. (Soyer's.)
Have ready six pounds of rump of beef, cut into pieces two inches square, each of which lard through with two or three strips of bacon; have also two pounds of streaked bacon, which clear from the rin...
-524. - Potted Beef
To a pound of common salt, put a quarter of an ounce of saltpetre, and two ounces of coarse sugar. Rub three pounds of lean beef with this, and let it remain in the brine fifty hours. Drain and dry it...
-540. - Ox Heart
This dish, although not very recherche, is a good family one, and remarkable for its cheapness. Put it into lukewarm water, one hour to disgorge; then wipe it well with a cloth, and stuff the interior...
-547. - Potatoes And Meat Salad
Proceed as in the last, but omitting the lettuce; if any cold potatoes remain from a previous dinner, peel and cut them in halves if small, but in quarters if large, and then into pieces the size of a...
-548. - Ox Kidneys
Cut a nice fresh ox-kidney into slices, each being about the size of a half crown piece, but double the thickness (avoiding the white part, or root, which is tough and indigestible), then put a quarte...
-550. - Remains Of Ox-Tongue
The remains of a tongue from a previous dinner may be again served thus:-Cut it into thin slices, put a small piece of butter into a frying-pan, lay the pieces of tongue over, which warm a few minutes...
-564. - A Cullis
You must take meat according to the number of guests; if ten or twelve, a leg of veal and a ham will be necessary, with all the fat, skin, and outside cut off; cut the leg of veal into pieces about th...
-Veal
The failing of this meat is its tendency to turn;. should it show any symptoms of doing this, put it into scalding water and let it boil for seven or eight minutes, with some pieces of charcoal affixe...
-572. - Fillet Of Veal Roasted
Take out the bone, fill the space with a fine stuffing, and let the fat be skewered quite round; stuff it also well under the skin with bread, sage, chopped onions and parsley, as much depends on the ...
-593. - Veal Cutlets-Crumbed Or Plain
If you have not got the leg of veal or the cutlet piece, get a thick slice of veal and cut fourteen good sized cutlets, not too thin, flatten each, and trim them a good shape, wet your beater in cold ...
-604. - Scotch Collops
If brown, cut the collops thin, beat them a little, fry them in butter for about two minutes, after having seasoned them with a little beaten mace; place them in a deep dish as they are fried, and cov...
-613. - Farcies Of Veal
Chop off the thick bone of a small neck of veal to the end of the fifth rib; divide the cutlets, and with a broad knife beat the meat of each flat, and cover it with forcemeat of lean veal, beef suet,...
-614. - Rolled Veal
The breast is the best for this purpose. Bone a piece of the breast, and lay a forcemeat over it of herbs, bread, an anchovy, a spoonful or two of scraped ham, a very little, mace, white pepper, and c...
-616. - Stewed Calf's Liver. - (Soyer's.)
Choose a nice fat one, rather white in color, lard it through with bacon, put one-quarter of a pound of butter in a pan; when melted, add a table-spoonful of flour, keep stirring until a nice yellow c...
-619. - Fricandeau Of Veal
In France the fricandeau is not unfre-quently larded in the interior as well as the outside, by having pieces of the size of a little finger cut off the meat with an instrument something like a cheese...
-625. - Veal Curry
Cut up about two pounds of lean veal into small square pieces, half the size of walnuts; then put a large onion cut into small dice, in a stewpan, with a clove or garlic and one apple cut into slices,...
-627. - Calves' Feet
Stewed When properly cleaned, rub the feet over with pepper, a very little salt, a little ground ginger, and mace; cut the feet into moderately sized pieces, and put them into a stewpan with a little...
-629. - Calves' Ears Stuffed
The hair being scalded off the ears, after they have been cut quite close to the head, scald and clean them as well as possible; boil them quite tender, and blanch them in cold water. Observe that the...
-630. - Calves' Brains
Remove all the large fibres and skin; soak them in warm water for four hours; blanch them for ten minutes in boiling water, with a little salt and vinegar in it; then soak them three hours in lemon-ju...
-655. - Calf's Head A La Tortue
Bone a calf's head whole; after being well scalded and cleaned cut off the ears, take out the tongue, cut the gristle and bones from the tongue; prepare a good forcemeat, add some chopped truffles int...
-656. - Calf's Head
Choose one thick and fat, but not too large; soak for ten minutes in lukewarm water, then well powder with rosin, have plenty of scalding water ready, dip in the head, holding it by the ear, scrape th...
-663. - Blanquettes
Melt a piece of butter the size of a walnut in a stewpan; then put in a little thyme, parsley, or any herbs you like the flavor. of, and a little onion, all chopped fine, with a pinch of flour. Brown ...
-681. - Saddle Of Mutton, A La Polonaise. (Soyer's.)
This is my economical dish, par excel-lence, and very much it is liked every time I use it. Take the remains of a saddle of mutton, of the previous day, cut out all the meat close to the bone, leaving...
-682. - Soyer's New Mutton Chop
Trim a middling-sized saddle of mutton, which cut into chops half an inch in thickness with a saw, without at all making use of a knife (the sawing them off jagging the meat and causing them to eat mo...
-695. - Mutton Cutlets
Loin chops make the best cutlets. Take off the vertebrae or thickest end of each bone and about an inch off the top of the bone; put the chops into a stew-pan in which has been previously melted a lit...
-705. - Mutton Haricot
Take a loin of mutton, cut it into small chops, season it with ground pepper, allspice and salt; let it stand a night, and then fry it. Have good gravy well seasoned with flour, butter, ketchup, and p...
-717. - Rognon De Mouton A La Fran-Caise
Take half a dozen fine mutton kidneys, clear them of fat and skin, and cut them into thin slices; powder them immediately with sweet herbs in fine powder, parsley which has been chopped, dried, and po...
-723. - Mutton Cutlets With Soubise, Or Onion Sauce
Take a neck of mutton, and cut the chops one by one without flattening them; cut off some of the flat bone at the extremity of the chops. Put them into a stewpan with all the parings, together with th...
-734. - Sheep's Head. - (English.)
Though this may be seen in every part of London inhabited by the working classes, and may be procured ready cooked, I prefer always to prepare it at home, and very good it is. Choose a fine one. as fa...
-735. - Sheep's Heads, Hearts, Tails, And Tongues
A great variety of excellent dishes may be made from a sheep's head, which in India, where veal is not so easily procurable, answers all the purposes for mock turtle, rolled head, rich hash, or ragout...
-738. - Sheep's Trotters. - (Soyer.)
I get a dozen of them from the tripe-butcher, all cleaned and ready, and beg of him to extract the long bone from them. I put a quarter of a pound of beef or mutton-suet in a stewpan, with two onions ...
-739. - French Ragout of Mutton
Take about two pounds of the scrag of the neck, breast, chump, or any other part, with as little fat as possible, cut it into pieces of about two inches square, put into a pan two ounces of butter, or...
-746. - The Same With Cabbage Lettuces
The tongues are to be braised as above, the same as those you wish to cook in any way whatever. Take a dozen and a half of good cabbage-lettuces, wash them very clean and blanch them. When they are co...
-757. - Neck Of Lamb A La Jardiniere
Plain roast the neck, as you would that of mutton; and whilst it is roasting, cut one middle-sized carrot in small dice, the same quantity of turnip, and thirty button onions; wash all in cold water, ...
-762. - Shoulder Of Lamb Braised
Take the blade bone from a shoulder of lamb, and have ready ten long strips of fat bacon, which season rather highly with pepper, salt, and a teaspoonful of chopped parsley; place the pieces, one afte...
-Pork
The proportion of persons who are fond of pork to those who dislike it, are as a hundred to one, and yet it is falsely considered a vulgar taste. The passion for it possessed by the Chinese has been i...
-792. - To Roast A Sucking Pig
A sucking pig, which should be about three weeks old, must be dressed as soon after being killed as practicable. When scalded and prepared for cooking, lay in the belly a stuffing of bread, sage and o...
-794. - To Roast A Pig. (Philadelphia.)
Take a pig not more than a month old, remove the eyes and tongue, trim the ears, cut off the feet, and clean it thoroughly. Wash and dry it; rub it well, inside and outside, with sage and seasoning of...
-805. - Leg Of Pork
How To Bake Rub it well over with salt and saltpetre mixed; let it lie five or six days in the brine; then hang it up to smoke for five or six days. Take off the skin, put it into an earthen dish, an...
-818. - Pork Sausages
There are many receipts for the making of pork sausages. The peculiarity in sausages being the quantity and variety of herbs introduced, the prevalence of some particular one gives the flavor, as well...
-830. - Saucisses Aux Chataignes. - Stewed Sausage Meat With Chestnuts
Take twenty or thirty sound chestnuts, roast them over a slow fire, and when sufficiently roasted to remove the husk take them off, peel them, removing the inner skin as well as the husk, and put them...
-832. - Pig's Head Baked
Let it be divided, and thoroughly cleaned; take out the brains, trim the snout and ears, bake it an hour and a half, wash the brains thoroughly, blanch them, beat them up with an egg, pepper, and salt...
-854. - To Boil
If long hung, soak it for twenty-four hours in lukewarm water, changing it frequently. Wash and brush it well: trim off any rusty parts; put it into a boiler of water, and let it simmer from three hou...
-859. - Ham And Eggs Fried
Cut some nice slices of ham, put them in a frying-pan; cover them with hot water, and set the pan over the fire. Let it boil up once or twice; then take out the slices and throw out the water; put a b...
-862. - To Cure Hams
Pound some rock salt, saltpetre, and common salt, and some coarse brown sugar, mix it all well together, then put it all to get hot, and while hot rub the hams well with this, repeating it every morni...
-867. - To Make Ham Superior To Westphalia. (Ude.)
As soon as the pig is cold enough to be cut up, take the two hams, and cut out the round bone, so as to have the ham not too thick: rub them with common salt, and leave them in a large pan for three d...
-871. -To Cure Bacon. - Cobbetts Receipt
The two sides that remain, and which are called flitches, are to be cured for bacon. They are first rubbed with salt on their insides, or flesh .sides, then placed one on the other, the flesh sides up...
-Dishes Prom The Remains Of Pork. 881. - Hashed Pork
Put two spoonfuls of chopped onions into a stewpan, with a wineglassful of vinegar, two cloves, a blade of mace, and a bay-leaf; reduce to half, take out the spice and bay-leaf, add half a pint of bro...
-882. - Fritadella (Twenty Receipts in one.)
Put half a pound of crumb of bread to soak in a pint of cold water, take the same quantity of any kind of roast or boiled meat, with a little fat, chop it up like sausage-meat, then put your bread in ...
-883. - Ramifolle
These are a little more expensive than the fritadella, and worthy the table of a crowned head. The flesh of fowls instead of lamb or veal, with the addition of one or two fat livers cut in dice. Proce...
-885. - Cutlets A La Victime, Or Victimized Cutlets
Invented by a culinary artist in the time of Louis XVIII, of France, at the palace of the Tuileries, and first partaken of by that intellectual monarch and gourmet, who, at the end of his stormy reign...
-888. - Common Sausage-Meat
Take any quantity of lean beef or pork, with half the quantity of fat. and having freed the lean of every particle of skin, sinew, and gristle, then mince both it and the fat as fine as possible; putt...
-895. - Spanish And Portuguese Sausages
Are made from the fat and lean of the back and loins of a well-fed two-year-old hog, cut into small pieces of less than half an inch square, and then either finely minced or pounded together, and stro...
-896. - Black Puddings
The blood must be stirred with salt till cold. Put a quart of it or rather more, to a quart of whole grits, to soak one night; and soak the crumb of a wheat loaf in rather more than two quartss of new...
-Forcemeat
French cooks pride themselves, and very justly, on the pains which they bestow on the elaboration of their forcemeat, or farce. It is an art in which they have attained superior excellence, but in whi...
-Curing Meat, Potting, And Collaring. 902. - Curing
In salting all meat, care should be taken to remove the kernels, otherwise it will soon become tainted. It should be sprinkled with a handful of common salt to fetch out the blood, the brine thrown aw...
-908. - To Corn Beef
A Sound Of Beef Of Eighteen Or Twenty Pounds' Weight Mix an ounce and a half of sal-prunella, three ounces of brown sugar, half an ounce of black pepper, six ounces of fine salt, a quarter of an ounc...
-908. - To Cure Tongues
Neats' tongues cured with the whole root on look much larger, but have not any other advantage, being too hard to cut pleasantly when salted. If the root is to be removed, cut it off near the gullet, ...
-910. - For Curing Hams
Choose the leg of a hog that is fat and well fed, as well as of a certain age; for if poor, it is not worth curing, and if not one year old it will never acquire the fine flavor of a mellow ham. Sprin...
-916. - Bacon
The Method Of Curing Malines Bacon, So Much Admired For Its Fine Flavor Cut off the hams and head of a pig, if a large one; take out the chine and leave in the sparerib, as they will keep in the grav...
-917. - The Black Pool Receipt for Cueing Bacon
For a middling-sized hog take twelve pounds of the best common salt, and one pound of saltpetre pounded very finely; rub it in well, and cover the meat about an inch thick, hams, chaps, and all; placi...
-921. - Brawn
Split and nicely clean a hog's head; take out the brains; cut off the ears, and rub a good deal of salt into the head; let it drain twenty-four hours; then lay upon it two ounces of saltpetre, and the...
-925. - A Pickle
That will keep for years, for hams, tongues or beef if boiled and skimmed between each parcel of them. - To two gallons of spring water put two pounds of coars sugar, two pounds of coarse, and two an ...
-928. - To Pot Shell-Fish
Boil lobsters and shrimps in salt and water; pick the meat out of the tails and claws; put them into a stewpan, with a little butter, some chopped mushrooms or truffles, and simmer a short time over a...
-929. - To Pot Poultry And Game
Chickens Take as much lean of boiled ham as you may think proper, and half the quantity of fat; each cut as thin as possible; beat it very fine in a mortar, with a little clarified butter, pounded ma...
-948. - To Collar Beef
Make a pickle with six ounces of brown sugar, four ounces of common salt, and one ounce of saltpetre. Then take a flank of beef, and leave it in the pickle for ten days or a fortnight, turning it ever...
-954. - To Collar Pig's Head
Scour the head and ears nicely; take off the hair and snout, and take out the eyes and the brains; lay it in water one night: then drain, salt it extremely well with common salt and saltpetre, and let...
-961. - Soyers Simplified Way Of Making The Savory Jelly Called Aspic
Put a galantine in a stewpan with two onions, a carrot, half a head of celery, two cloves, a blade of mace, a good bunch of parsley, a little thyme, and bay-leaves, a knuckle of veal, the bones of a t...
-962. - To Clarify Meat Jelly
Having passed the stock (made as in he last) through the sieve into a basin, leave it until quite cold; then take off all the fat very carefully; ascertain if sufficiently, or too stiff, by putting a ...
-Poultry
Always have good and fat poultry where possible; in the country you may command it. About three weeks before you want to use them, six or twelve fowls, according, to your consumption, should be put in...
-966. - Turkey Roast
It is stuffed with either sausage meat or fillet of veal stuffing, or crumbs of bread and veal. While roasting, a piece of paper should be placed over the part stuffed, as being bulky it will catch th...
-974. - Soyer's Boiled Braised Turkey
Truss it thus: cut the neck, leaving the skin on; cut the legs off; then run the middle finger into the inside, raise the skin of the legs, and put them under the apron of the turkey, put the liver an...
-975. - Roast Braised Turkey (Soyer.)
Peel and wash two onions, one carrot, one turnip, cut them in thin slices, also a little celery, a few sprigs of parsley, two bay-leaves, lay three sheets of paper on the table, spread your vegetables...
-976. - Turkey, If Old
The French stew it exactly like the ribs of beef. Soyer says:- Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a convenient-sized stewpan, such as will conveniently hold it; cut one pound of lean bacon in ten...
-984. - To Braise A Fowl
Bone the breast, and fill it with forcemeat. Lay the bones, and any other poultry trimmings, into a stew-pan, and the fowl on them. Put to them a few onions, a fagot of herbs, three blades of mace, a ...
-987. - Fowl Pillau
Put one pound of rice into a frying-pan with two ounces of butter, which keep moving over a slow fire, until the rice is lightly browned , then have ready a fowl trussed as for boiling, which p...
-989. - Fricassee Of Fowl
Put the fowl into a jar, with sliced onion, parsley, salt, and a piece of butter rolled in flour; let it remain in a kettle of water on the fire until three parts done; then skim and strain the liquor...
-990. - Poele. (French.)
Poele is almost the same operation as braising; the only difference is, that what is poele must be underdone, and a braise must be done through. As the poele has no translation, it retains its name; ...
-997. - Fried Chicken A La Malabar
The Indian receipts for cooking chicken are very numerous; we select the following. Cut up the fowl as for a stew. removing the joints carefully and carving the body into handsome shapes; remove all m...
-998. - Pigeons Roasted
Veal stuffing for pigeons improves the flavor; they must be fresh and well cleaned; butter and parsley may be served with them, but parsley alone as a stuffing, though frequently used, is by no means ...
-1007. - An Indian Pilau
Truss a fowl as for boiling, pass it a few minutes in the oven, raising it up with fat bacon or buttered paper; fry some onions, a few bruised coriander seeds, and a few cardamom seeds whole: fry a ni...
-1008. - Curry Of Chicken
Cut up a raw chicken; put into a stewpan, with two ounces of butter, half a large onion sliced thin, a few sprigs of parsley and thyme, and two ounces of lean ham; let the whole sweat over the fire fo...
-1011. - To Roast A Goose
Goose in itself is of a strong rich flavor, and requires both nicety in the cooking as well as in the stuffing to obviate that strength of flavor. There are many modes of stuffing; for one mode, take ...
-1012. - Preserved Goose For The Farm Or Country House
In case you have more geese in condition and season than what you consume, kill and cut them up into pieces, so that there shall be as little flesh left on the carcass as possible, and bone the leg; r...
-1018. - Wild Ducks, Or Teal
You must be very particular in not roasting these birds too much; baste them very frequently; teal will of course take less time; but your fire and motion of the spit must be attended to, and when you...
-1022. - Salmi Of Partridge
Half roast the partridges, cut them up neatly, take off the skin; put the trimmings in a stewpan, with a bit of butter and a tablespoonful of flour; stir the whole over the fire; then add a glass of w...
-1025. - Rabbits
To Fricassee a rabbit cut it in pieces, reserve the liver; put a piece of bacon cut in slices into a stewpan, brown it well and lay it aside; put the rabbit in the pan with a piece of butter; turn and...
-1028. - Jugged Hare
Skin the hare, and cut it in pieces, but do not wash it; strew it over with pepper and salt, fry it brown. Make a seasoning of two anchovies, a sprig of thyme, a little parsley, a nutmeg grated, a lit...
-1033. - Rabbits, To Skin, Etc
Cut round the skin at the first joint of the hind legs, and pull the skin up a little, then run the knife between the sinew and the bone of the leg, so as to make a hole to hang it on a nail in a wall...
-Venison. 1034. - The Haunch
The observed of all observers when epicureans sit at table; it is a joint, if properly kept, properly cooked and served hot, which must prove delicious. The delicacy of its flavor is obtained by ha...
-1039. - Roast Shoulder Or Venison
Take the bones out of a shoulder of venison. Fill the cavity with the fat of a loin of mutton. Roast before a quick fire, basting it constantly with the drippings and a little port wine. It should be ...
-1041. - Woodcock, Snipe, Etc
To roast these birds, put them on a little spit, take a slice of wheaten bread, and toast it brown, then lay it on a dish under the birds; baste them with a little butter, and let the trail drop on th...
-Vegetables
The fresher all green vegetables are used after being taken from the ground the better; and therefore nothing can be comparable to cutting them from your own garden; but, when purchased in the market,...
-1042. - Potatoes
Require no attention for the preservation of their color, but their flavor will be spoiled if their dressing be not attended to, which, although of the most simple nature, is frequently ill performed....
-1052. - Potatoes A La Maitre D'Hotel
Boil the potatoes; before they are quite done take them up, place them aside, and let them get cold; cut them in slices of a moderate thickness; place in a stewpan a lump of fresh butter, and a teaspo...
-1055. - Green Peas
A delicious vegetable, a grateful accessory to many dishes of a more substantial nature. Green peas should be sent to table green; no dish looks less tempting than peas if they wear an autumnal aspect...
-1061. - Asperge En Petit Pois, Or Asparagus Peas
If the asparagus be properly dressed, it should taste like green peas. Take some young asparagus, which pick with great care; then cut them into small equal pieces, avoiding to put in such parts as ar...
-1071. - Sauer Kraut
Or Sour-Kraut, is a German preparation of cabbage, fermented in layers, between which salt is laid, and the whole pressed closely down with weights for a few days, at the end of which it becomes acid,...
-1073. - Artichokes
Cut away the outside leaves and make the stalk as even as possible, put them into boiling water with some salt; if they are very young they will be tender in half an hour, if rather old they will requ...
-1096. - To Preserve Peas for Winter Use
Shell, scald, and dry them: put them on tins or earthen dishes, in a cool oven, once or twice, to harden. Keep them in paper bags hung up in the kitchen. When they are to be used, let them lie an hour...
-1104. - Mushrooms
The mushrooms proper to be used in cookery grow in the open pasture land, for those that grow near or under trees, are poisonous. The eatable mushrooms first appear very small, and of a round form, on...
-1109. - Truffles
The truffle, like the mushroom, is a species of fungus common in France and Italy. It grows about eight or ten inches below the surface of the ground. As it imparts a most delicious flavor, it is much...
-1114. - Salads
Coss-lettuce and blanched endive make the best salad, the green leaves being stripped off, and leaving nothing but the close, white hearts, which, after being washed and placed for an hour or two in c...
-1115. - Chicken Salad. (English.)
Pull the meat off the bones, put it into a small pan with a shalot cut in thin slices, a few sprigs of parsley, and a table-spoonful each of oil and tarragon vinegar; season the chicken well with pepp...
-1117. - Salad Of Fowl
Proceed as for that of game, so far as the eggs and the salad are concerned; then have a chicken, which has been previously plain roasted, or in vegetables, and cut it into ten neat pieces, put it int...
-Pickles And Store-Room Sauces
Although meat, when cured and dried, is called pickled, yet in that operation salt alone is employed as brine, while in the pickling of vegetables, of which we are about to treat, the means chiefly ...
-1121. - To Pickle Onions
Silver Sort Choose small button onions, as near of a size as possible; throw them into warm water, which will prevent their affecting the eyes so much, while peeling them. As they are peeled, throw t...
-1124. - Mushrooms
How To Pickle Mushrooms White Take the very small buttons, clean and rub them with a flannel, then put them into cold distilled vinegar, and allow it to come to a boil very slowly; drain and lay them...
-1126. - To Pickle Walnuts
Gather the walnuts when tender, and put them in salt and water: prick each with a needle several times; let them stand two or three days, changing the water every day. Make a brine of salt and water s...
-1135. - Pickled Tomatoes
The tomatoes should not be very ripe. Mix in a large stone jar, one ounce of mustard, and half the same quantity of cloves and black pepper, and fill the jar half full of the best vinegar. Lay in the...
-1138. - Mixed Pickle
To one gallon of vinegar put four ounces of ginger bruised, two ounces of white pepper, two of allspice, two of chilis, four of turmeric, one pound of mustard-seed, one-half pound of shalots, one ounc...
-1139. - India Pickle
Is made in nearly the same manner. Put two hundred gherkins, three pints of small onions, one . quart of nasturtiums, one ditto of radish-pods, one quart of French beans, six cauliflowers, and two har...
-1147. - Grapes
Cut them, when hardly ripe, in bunches, put them in a jar with vine leaves between each layer of grapes until the jar is filled; then take as much spring water as will cover the grapes and the leaves....
-1153. - Camp Vinegar
Slice a large head of garlic, and put it into a wide-mouthed bottle, with half an ounce of cayenne, two teaspoonfuls of real soy, two of walnut ketchup, four anchovies chopped, one pint of vinegar, an...
-1165. - Musheoom Ketchup
Take the full-grown flaps of freshly-gathered mushrooms, crush them with the hands, throw a handful of salt into every peck, and let them stand a night or two; then put them into pans, and set them in...
-1166. - Walnut Ketchup
Thoroughly bruise one hundred and twenty young walnuts; put to them three-quarters of a pound of fine salt and quart of vinegar; stir them every day or a fortnight; then strain; squeeze the liquor fro...
-1167. - Cucumber Ketchup
Take an equal quantity of large cucumbers and large onions, pare and slice them; throw over them a handful of salt, and let them stand all night in a sieve placed over a pan. Take the liquor and boil ...
-1169. - Tomato Sauce For Winter Use
One peck of tomatoes, six onions sliced, two heads of celery, a dozen shalots, one ounce of cayenne pepper, half an ounce of black pepper, one ounce of mace in powder. Slice them into a well-tinned sa...
-1171. - Seven-Years' Ketchup
Take two quarts of the oldest strong beer, put to it one quart of red wine, three-quarters of a pound of anchovies, three ounces of shalots peeled, half an ounce of mace, the same of nutmegs, quarter ...
-1172. - Artificial Sauces For Fish
Those most commonly used are soy and anchovy, merely mixed from the cruets into melted butter by each individual of the company; the butter, when brought to table in a prepared state, should be made a...
-1173. - Store Sauces
1. Take two wine-glasses of port, two of walnut and four of mushroom ketchup, four anchovies pounded, with two shalots, a table-spoonful of soy, and a tea-spoonful of cayenne pepper. Boil all well tog...
-Paste - Meat Pies - Fish Pies. 1176. - Various Sorts Of Paste
In making paste for pies great care should be taken that the flour be well dried; for the finer kinds of paste it ought also to be sifted. The very best salt butter is perhaps the best material for ma...
-1177. - Crust For Raised Pies
Boil water with a little fine lard, and an equal quantity of fresh dripping, or of butter, but not much of either. While hot, mix this with as much flour as you will want, making the paste as stiff as...
-1179. - Puff Paste
To obtain this in perfection much will depend on the quality of the butter used, and on its being rolled out or turned a sufficient number of times, so that the butter may be mixed with the paste in m...
-1182. - Brioche Paste
This paste is essential in many of the finer kinds of cookery, and, though rather troublesome to make, will repay the pains bestowed, since, with a small addition of sauce, it will afford an excellent...
-1188. - Raised Pie Of Fowls. (Soyer.)
Make the paste and forcemeat, bone a young fowl, which lay flat upon a clean cloth, breast downwards; season the interior with a little pepper, salt, and chopped onions; spread a layer of forcemeat ov...
-1189. - Raised Pie Of Pheasant
Proceed precisely as for the pie of fowl, but of course using a pheasant; an old one would answer the purpose if kept long enough, but all the' sinews of the legs must be taken out in boning it; the f...
-1190. - Hot Lamb Pie (Raised.)
To make this an oval, a tin or copper pie mould would be required, which you would choose of a size most generally useful. Butter the interior of the mould, which stand upon a baking sheet, then make ...
-1191. - Other Various Pies
Hot raised pies may also be made with mutton by following the above directions. They are also very good made with fillet of beef cut into thin slices of the size of the lamb chops, or of rump steak, b...
-1195. - Pate De Foies Gras
[This receipt is famished by Mr. Del-monico, expressly for this work.] Prepare a stuffing of fresh pork, a pound of lean to a pound and a half of fat; mince and chop it: add your preparation of liver...
-1205. - Beefsteak Pudding
Put a pound of flour upon a dresser, with which mix half a pound of beef suet, very finely chopped, make a hole in the middle, into which put a teaspoonful of salt, and sufficient water to form a rath...
-1220. - Calf's Head Pie
Stew a knuckle of veal till fit for eating with two onions, a little isinglass, a fagot of sweet herbs, a blade of mace, and a few peppercorns in three pints of water; keep the broth for the pie. Take...
-1235. - Excellent Pork Pies To Eat Cold
Raise the crust according to the directions already given, into either a round or oval form, as you choose; have ready the trimmings and small bits of pork cut off when a hog is killed; and if these a...
-1241. - Venison Pasty
The neck, breast, and shoulder are the only parts of the deer used for a pasty; and even the neck is more generally roasted. Cut the venison in pieces; put it into a stewpan with a little port wine, ...
-1244. - A Christmas Pie
Bone a large goose and a fowl. Parboil a smoked tongue; peel it and cut off the root. Mix together a powdered nutmeg. a quarter of an ounce of powdered mace, a tea-spoonful of pepper, the same quantit...
-1245. - Patties
Roll out puff paste half an inch thick, and, with a two-inch round cutter, cut as many pieces as are required for the dish. Take an inch cutter, dip it in hot water, and press it in the middle of the ...
-Fruit Pies, Puffs, Puddings, Etc
All pies made either with summer fruit or with winter preserves will be improved by a mixture of apples, pared and sliced. They are especially good with fresh cherries, currants, etc, and will be foun...
-1252. - Puff Paste, Or Confectioners Pastry
Weigh out a pound and a quarter of sifted flour, and a pound of butter. Rub about one-third of the butter with two-thirds of the flour, and a teaspoonful of salt. When the butter is thoroughly mixed w...
-1255. - Pumpkin Pie
Halve the pumpkin, take out the seeds -rinse the pumpkin, and cut it into small strips - stew them over a moderate fire, in just sufficient water to prevent their burning to the bottom of the pot. Wh...
-1263. - Mince Pies
Fresh tongue must be used. It should be for two days well covered with equal quantities of salt, brown sugar, and powdered cloves. After boiling it until it is thoroughly done - say two hours - skin i...
-1265. - Mince Meat For Christmas Pies. (Miss Jane Strickland's Receipt)
Take equal quantities of finely shred and chopped beef suet; cold roast beef, well roasted; currants, washed, dried, and picked; and raisins stoned and chopped; and apples, pared, cored, and chopped f...
-1269. - Codling Tart
Scald the fruit; when ready, take off the skin, and lav them whole in a dish; put a little of the water that the apples were boiled in at bottom, strew them over with powdered lump sugar; when cold, p...
-1271. - Excellent Light Puffs
Mix two spoonfuls of flour, a little grated lemon-peel, some nutmeg, half a spoonful of brandy, a little loaf-sugar, and one egg; then fry it enough, but not brown; beat it in a mortar with five eggs,...
-1272. - Gauffres
Take four or five ounces of flour, three ounces of pounded sugar, half a pint of whipped cream, four or five eggs, a small stick of pounded vanilla, a grating of nutmeg, and a little salt, with a glas...
-1275. - Vol-Au-Vent
Means light as wind; you must therefore make this paste very delicate. It is used for first or second courses. Of all things in pastry the vol-au-vent requires the most care and precision; they that c...
-1277. - Small Fruit Tarts
The next in order to sweet vol-au vents, and which are easier to make, are tartlets, their appearance being inviting, and their expense limited, and very easy to serve. They may be made from the trimm...
-1283. - Almond Paste
Take a pound of sweet almonds, blanch them in boiling water; take off the peel, and let them soak in cold water four hours, then pound them well in a mortar; add a little water to prevent them from tu...
-1298. - Potato Cheesecake
Four ounces of butter, the same of pounded sugar, six ounces of potatoes boiled and floured through a sieve, the rind of one lemon, and half the juice, unless acid is desirable; mix these ingredients ...
-1301. - Soyer's Cheesecakes
Take four quarts of milk and turn it with some fresh runnet; when dry crumble it and sift it through a coarse sieve into a bowl, beat it well up with a quarter of a pound of butter until it is quite s...
-1303. - Puddings
There are two different sorts of paste for puddings, one for meat and the other for fruit. For Meat Pudding To one pound of flour add eight ounces of finely chopped beef-suet cut from the kidney. Mi...
-1304. - Suet Puddings
Finely chop one pound of beef suet; mix with it one pound and a quarter of flour, two eggs well beaten, a little salt, and as little milk as will mix it. Boil four hours. It eats well next day cut in ...
-1313. - Rich Plum Pudding
Stone carefully one pound of the best raisins, wash and pick one pound of currants,* chop very small one pound of fresh * The best method of cleansing currants is to put them into a common colander, ...
-1337. - Batter Pudding
Into a pint and a half of sifted flour stir gradually, so that it may not be lumpy, a quart of milk. Beat seven eggs, and put in, together with a couple of table-spoonfuls of melted butter, and a coup...
-1350. - Trifles
Should be made early in the day on which they are wanted; take a stale sponge cake, cut it in slices of one inch thick, and lay it on the bottom of the dish; lay on that a thin layer of any kind of ma...
-1364. - A Very Fine German Pudding
Pour half a pint of boiling milk upon one pound of bread-crumbs; beat up a quarter of a pound of fresh butter to a cream; add to it the yolks of ten eggs well beaten; drain the milk from the bread, an...
-1373. - Macaroni
Some cooks are very fond of boiling it in milk, and even of laying it in milk for an hour or two to swell and become tender, but boiling water is as good. A quarter of a pound will be sufficient for h...
-1379. - To Boil Rice
Very few persons know how to boil rice properly. It is usually so boiled as to become a heavy dough, so tenacious and solid as to be almost impenetrable to the digestive fluids secreted by the mouth a...
-1386. - Souffle Of Apples With A Rice Border
Prepare your rice as for a croquette. Keep it of a strong solid substance; dress it up all round a dish, the same height as a raised crust, that is to say, three inches high. Give a pleasing shape to ...
-1390. - Cream Cheese
Take a small pan of fresh morning's milk, warm from the cow is best, and mix with the cream skimmed from an equal quantity of the last night's milk. Warm it to blood heat, pour into it a cup of water,...
-1392. - Eggs And Cheese
Are mixed together in various ways by French cooks, under the names of fondus or fondeaux, ramequins, and other titles, for the purpose of preparing entremets, or side-dishes, for elegant tables. Gru...
-1393. - Ramequins
Take two eggs, two spoonfuls of flour, two ounces of melted butter, and two of grated cheese; mix all well together, and bake it in moulds or tart-pans for a quarter of an hour. A La Parisienne Boil...
-1400. - Pancakes
The common sort are composed of a light batter, made of eggs, flour, and milk, fried in hot dripping or lard, only half of the whites of the eggs being generally used; but salt, or nutmeg, and ginger,...
-1406. - Fritters
Although a species of pancakes, are yet not so wholly composed of eggs, and may be made of almost any substance fried in butter. Make them of any of the batters directed for pancakes, dropping a small...
-Various Modes Of Cooking Eggs
Unless an egg is perfectly fresh it is unfit for any purpose. You may try the freshness of eggs by putting them in a pan of cold water. Those that sink the soonest are the freshest. Eggs may be preser...
-1409. - To Boil Eggs
To effect the simple process of boiling demands constant attention, as half a minute more or less may spoil the egg for a fastidious palate. Some put them into cold water, and, when it boils, allow th...
-1410. - To Poach Eggs
Is to boil them without their shells, and requires still greater care. The water must be perfectly pure, and the yolk must be only just so much done as to fix itself firmly in the centre of the white....
-1411. - Omelette
This is the most usual mode of dressing eggs, after that of boiling them in the shell. Four eggs will make a very pretty sized omelet, but the number must of course depend on the size required. If sw...
-1412. - Omelette Au Naturel
Take four eggs, beat the yolks and whites together with a table-spoonful of milk, a little salt and pepper; put two ounces of butter into a frying-pan to boil, and let it remain until it begins to bro...
-1413. - Omelette Soufflee
Take six eggs, separate the whites from the yolks, add to the yolks a table-spoonful of arrowroot or potato-flour, six ounces of pounded loaf-sugar, some grated lemon-peel, and a small quantity of lem...
-1417. - Ceufs Farcis
Boil six eggs hard, remove the shells, but leave the eggs whole; cover them with a rich forcemeat made with scraped ham, pounded anchovy, pounded veal, and bacon fat, well pounded together and highly ...
-1419. - Ceufs Brouilles
Break four or six eggs; beat them and put them into a saucepan with a piece of butter, a little salt, and a spoonful of sauce or gravy, which makes the eggs softer; stir them over the fire until suffi...
-1421. - Snow Eggs
Take half a pint of milk and a little sugar, and flavor it with orange-flower water, or any other essence, and put it in a stewpan on the fire, having previously beaten up the whites of six eggs to a ...
-1423. - Garniture for Omelettes
Asparagus, Peas, And Green Peas Put in a stewpan three spoonfuls of plain boiled asparagus, that has previously been cut up, add to it half an ounce of butter, a little salt, pepper, and sugar, warm ...
-1426. - Rye And Indian Bread
There are many different proportions in the mixing of this bread. Some put one-third Indian with two of rye; others like one-third rye and two of Indian; others prefer it half and half. If you use th...
-1431. - Yeast Cakes
Boil three ounces hops in six quarts water, down to two quarts. Strain it, and while boiling hot, stir in wheat or rye meal to a batter. When milk-warm, add half a pint of good yeast, and let it stand...
-1432. - Potato Barm
Boil half an ounce of hops in four quarts of water, and leave it till the hops sink; then strain it into an earthen pot, and, when milk-warm, add three tables-spoonfuls of sugar and half a pint of flo...
-1454. - Wafer Cakes
Wafer cakes are an excellent tea cake, and they do not take long to make, although a little practice is necessary before they can be successfully made. Beat three eggs quite light. Wash a little les...
-1456. - Milk Rolls
Have a convenient-sized basin, into which put half a pound of the best flour, making a hole in the middle; add half an ounce of yeast, one ounce of butter, a teaspoonful of powdered sugar, and half di...
-1459. - Soyer's Brioche Rolls
Put four pounds of flour upon a dresser, one pound of which put on one side, make a hole in the middle, into which pour nearly three parts of a pint of warm water, in which you have dissolved yeast; m...
-Butter
Mrs. Hale says: Always to make good butter or cheese shows great care and excellent judgment in the farmers wife. When every department of the dairy is kept perfectly neat, there is hardly any exhibi...
-1460. - To Cure Butter In The Best Manner
The following receipt is from The Housewife's Manual, a work said to have been prepared by Sir Walter Scott. Having washed and beaten the butter free of buttermilk, work it quickly up, allowing a s...
-Cakes, Etc
In making cakes it is indispensably necessary that all the ingredients should be heated before they are mixed together, for which purpose every thing should be prepared for an hour or two previously t...
-1463. - Plum Cake (English)
Mix thoroughly two quarts of fine flour, well dried, with one pound of dry and sifted loaf-sugar, three pounds of currants washed and very dry, half a pound of raisins stoned and chopped, one-quarter ...
-1467. - German Sugar Cakes
Blend well with the fingers six ounces of good butter, with a pound of fine flour, working it quite into crumbs; add a few grains of salt, one pound of dry sifted sugar, a table-spoonful of the best c...
-1468. - Bride Cake
Wash two pounds and a half of fresh butter in plain water first, and then in rose-water; beat the butter to a cream; beat twenty eggs, yolks and whites separately, half an hour each. Have ready two po...
-1494. - Nourmahal Cake
Cut four slices of sponge cake about an inch thick and of an oval shape, but each slice smaller than the others. Spread a thick layer of apricot jam upon the first and largest slice, and then lay the ...
-1516. - Scotch Short-Bread
To four pounds of flour take two of butter, half a pound of moist sugar, quarter of a pound of citron, and the same of almonds, the latter blanched, and all cut small. Mix the sugar and fruit well wit...
-Custards, Creams, Jellies, Etc
Custard is always eaten cold, and either poured over fruit tarts, or served up separately in custard-cups, in each of which a macaroon steeped in wine, and laid at the bottom, will be found a good add...
-1540. - Coffee Custard
This is made by putting a quart of milk on the fire, with about six ounces of white sugar. In another vessel beat up the yolks of ten eggs, and pour the milk gradually upon them. Roast your coffee (th...
-1543. - Italian Cream
Whip together for nearly an hour a quart of very thick scalded cream, a quart of raw cream, the grated rind of four lemons and the strained juice, with ten ounces of white powdered sugar; then add hal...
-1553. - Wagner's Ice Creams. (These Receipts Are Furnished By Mr. Wagner Of New York, Expressly For This Work.)
Vanilla Ice Cream One quart cream, eight ounces sugar, crushed, half a vanilla bean. Boil half the cream with the sugar and bean, then add the rest of the cream, and cool and strain it Lemon Ice Cre...
-1559. - Calfs-Foot Jelly
It is a complaint amongst even experienced housekeepers that they cannot feel a certainty of having jelly clear; but by strictly attending to the following method for making calfs-foot jelly, they can...
-1563. - To Clarify Isinglass
Take two ounces of isinglass, pour on it a pint of spring water which has been mixed with a teaspoonful of beaten white of egg, and a table-spoonful of lemon-juice. Stir them thoroughly together, and ...
-1565. - Meringues
Pound and sift one pound of lump sugar, whisk the whites of twelve eggs very stiff, throw the sugar lightly over, and with a wooden spoon stir gently, perfectly mixing the sugar, then with a table or ...
-1567. - Nougat
Cut in dice or in fillets a pound of blanched sweet almonds, and mix with them eight or six bitter almonds. When they are cut equally, dry them in the oven, but keep them white; take three or four spo...
-Coffee. 1568. - Coffee
There are several ways of making coffee; and every housewife generally has her favorite mode. The French make excellent coffee without the aid of eggs, isinglass, or any foreign article to settle it. ...
-1569. - Coffee, To Roast
Coffee should never be roasted but when you are going to use it, and then it should be watched with the greatest care, and made of a gold color; mind and do not burn it, for a few grains burnt would c...
-Tea
Tastes differ regarding the flavor of various sorts of tea: some preferring all black; others, all green; and many, a mixture of both in different quantities; though most persons - when not fearful of...
-Chocolate
If made thin, is not worth drinking; and that which is commonly sold is a compound of flour, or some farinaceous substance, and coarse sugar, with a very moderate quantity of real cocoa, and that of t...
-Preserves, Etc
Preserves should be kept carefully from the air, and in a very dry place. Unless they have a very small proportion of sugar, a warm one does not hurt; but when not properly boiled, heat makes them fer...
-1579. - To Preserve Quinces
Ripe quinces pare and cut in slices an inch thick - take out the cores carefully, so as to have the slices in the form of a ring. Allow a pound of white sugar for each pound - dissolve it in cold wate...
-1580. - To Preserve Peaches, Apricots, Nectarines, And Plums
September is the best month for peaches, as they are then harder and larger. Weigh the peaches, put them into a preserving-pan full of cold water, with a slice or two of lemon; set them on a slow fire...
-1583. - To Preserve Pears
Pare them very thin, and simmer them in a thin syrup, allowing only one-quarter of a pound of sugar to a pound of pears. Let them lie for two days, add another quarter of a pound of sugar to each poun...
-1592. - To Dry Cherries
Weigh the cherries before they are stoned, and allow to every pound of fruit a quarter of a pound of lump-sugar; when they are stoned set them over a slow fire to heat, then take them out of the liquo...
-1593. - Currant Jam
Strip your currants, and put them into your pan, with three-quarters of a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit, add your sugar after your fruit has boiled a few minutes, boil all together, mashing your ...
-1596. - Ginger, Preserved
Take some green ginger, and with a sharp knife pare it neatly, and as it is pared throw into a pan of cold water to keep it white; when you have a sufficient quantity boil it till tender, changing the...
-1612. - To Keep Peaches Fresh
Pare and halve your peaches, have your cans perfectly dry, set one at a time in a bain marie in boiling water, to drive out the air. Fill the can as full as you can without bruising the fruit; if you ...
-1616. - To Boil Sugar For Baskets Or Spinning
Fill quite full a pint and a half stew-pan with pieces of lump sugar, fill the stewpan with clear spring water, let the water barely cover the sugar, put it on to boil, skim it all the time that any s...
-1617. - To Candy Fruit
Having prepared your fruit, steep it in the syrup, and lay it as done in an open sieve, until the bottom is covered with one layer; steep this suddenly in scalding water. This will remove any syrup wh...
-Beverages
Louis XII., of France, first gave permission to distil spirits on a large scale. So terrific were the effects twenty years afterwards, that Francis, his successor, was obliged, for the safety of his s...
-Beverages Composed Partly Of Fermented Liquors
Hot spiced wines were much in use till the beginning of the sixteenth century; and some of these favorite compounds were known by the names of ypocras, sack, and clary. The first of these, which took ...
-Wines And Liqueurs
Ginger Wine Take fourteen gallons of water, six pounds of sugar, four ounces of bruised ginger, and the whites of two eggs, well beaten; mix them, set on a fire, boil it fifteen minutes, skim it well...
-Cookery For The Sick
Invalid's Breakfast Set. It may be necessary to premise that a choice should be made of those things most likely to agree with the patient, and, as invalids require variety to indulge their appetit...
-Cookery For The Sick. Part 2
This conveys great nourishment in a small compass. Sippets On an extremely hot plate put two or three sippets of bread, and pour over them some gravy from beef, mutton, or veal, with which no butter...
-Cookery For The Sick. Part 3
Toast Water Pare the crust off a thin slice of stale bread, toast it brown upon both sides, doing it equally and slowly, that it may harden without being burnt; put it into a jug, and pour upon it bo...
-Cookery For The Sick. Part 4
Ground Bice Milk Boil together two table-spoonfuls of ground rice with a pint of milk. Sweeten it according to your taste, adding the juice of half a lemon. Let the whole boil half an hour over a mod...
-Cookery For The Sick. Part 5
Ground Rice Paste Boil a quarter of a pound in a little water, strain and beat it in a mortar with one egg, a small lump of butter and a pinch of salt; mould the paste as for tarts, and bake sweetmea...
-Food And Cookery For Children
The kinds of food to be given to very young children should be of the simplest description: besides cow's milk, diluted with one-third part of water, arrow-root and milk; pearl sago boiled in water ti...
-Food And Cookery For Children. Continued
How To Prepare Fruit For Children A far more wholesome way than in pies or puddings, is to put apples sliced, or plums, currants, gooseberries, etc, into a stone jar, and sprinkle among them as much ...
-Savory Dishes For Breakfast
Grillades Perhaps there is no better grill for breakfast than a cold blade-bone of mutton, off which the greater part of the meat has been already cut. The remaining parts should then be scored, and ...
-Menus
The following articles for Breakfasts are popular in Spring and Summer:-Veal Cutlets - Stewed or Fried Clams -Cold Boiled Ham or Tongue - Clam Fritters - Broiled Shad - Broiled and Fried Fish - Stewed...
-Part Third. Perfumery And The Toilet, The Family Medical Guide, Miscellaneous Receipts. Perfumery And The Toilet
The perfumes for the handkerchief, as found in the shops of Paris and London, are either simple or compound; the former are called extracts, extraits, esprits, or essences, and the latter bouquets and...
-Perfumery And The Toilet. Part 2
The odor of heliotrope resembles a mixture of almonds and vanilla, and is well imitated thus:- Extract of Heliotrope,- Half a pint of spirituous extract of vanilla; one gill of spirituous extract of ...
-Perfumery And The Toilet. Part 3
Hungary Water Rectified alcohol, one gallon; otto of English rosemary, two ounces; otto of lemon-peel, one ounce; otto of balm (Melissa), one ounce; otto of mint, half drachm; esprit de rose, one pin...
-Spirituous Infusions
Leaves, flowers, roots, wood, resins, powders, and perfumes of animal origin, all serve to furnish these tinctures. The substances are either cut, rasped, or bruised, according to their nature, and in...
-Oils For The Hair
For Thickening And Strengthening The Hair Skim the fat from the top of calves' feet while boiling; mix with a teaspoonful of rum; shake together. Apply night and morning. Pomatum Take white mutton ...
-Soaps
Savon Au Miel Take four ounces white soap, four ounces white honey, one ounce benzoin, half an ounce storax; mix the whole together in a marble mortar, and when well incorporated, melt the paste over...
-Soaps. Part 2
How To Eradicate Warts Dissolve as much common washing soda as the water will take up; repeatedly wash with this for a minute or two, and let them dry without wiping. Another Method Get a little bu...
-Soaps. Part 3
Vinaigre Virginal This mild and refreshing liquor is excellent to remove prickly heat, but, before being Used for such purpose, must be diluted with water. Take benzoin pulverized, two ounces; alcoh...
-Soaps. Part 4
Millefleur Sachet Lavender flowers, ground, one pound; orris, one pound; rose leaves, one pound; benzoin, one pound; tonquin, a quarter of a pound; vanilla, a quarter of a pound; santal, a quarter of...
-Fragrant Pastilles For Necklaces Or Bracelets
Pate De Roses Rose leaves, two ounces; lampblack, one and a half drachms; isinglass, one ounce; gum tra-gacanth, half ounce. Dissolve the gum and isinglass in boiling water, thicken the solution by ...
-The Family Medical Guide
No directions here given are intended to supply the place of medical attendance. A little medical knowledge is a dangerous thing, and this temporizing with the constitution is often attended with the ...
-The Family Medical Guide. Part 2
Bread And Water Poultice Scald out a basin, into which boiling water is to be turned, then add coarsely-crumbled bread as much as the water will absorb. After a little time drain off the surplus wate...
-The Family Medical Guide. Part 3
Simple Ointment is made by melting in a pipkin by the side of the fire, without boiling, one part of yellow or white wax, and two parts of hog's lard, without salt or olive oil. Resin Ointment or Yel...
-The Family Medical Guide. Part 4
When the proper number have been applied, they should be left quite alone, or they are apt to unfix, and, wandering about, arc of no further use. When they have sucked their fill, they generally drop ...
-The Family Medical Guide. Part 5
Wash the hands in cold water every three hours, and lather well with Windsor soap. When the hands are nearly dried with the towel, pour a little eau-de-Cologne, or milk of roses, into the palm of one ...
-The Family Medical Guide. Part 6
Cera Fortifant (for the Nails.) - Oil of lentise, half an ounce; salt, half a drachm; resin, one scruple; alum, one scruple; wax, one scruple. English Court-Plaster Stretch upon a frame a piece of t...
-Miscellaneous Receipts
How To Take Stains Out Of Linen For acid stains, wet the part, and lay on it salt of wormwood; then rub it, and hold the part over a lighted match, for the sulphurous gas; or, tie up pearlash in the ...
-Miscellaneous Receipts. Part 2
Save phials and bottles; apothecaries and grocers will give something for them. Woollens should be washed in very hot suds, and not rinsed; lukewarm water shrinks them. Silk should be washed in water...
-Miscellaneous Receipts. Part 3
How To Extract Grease Spots From Silks, Muslins, Etc Scrape French chalk, put it on the grease spot, and hold it near the fire, or over a warm iron or water-plate, filled with boiling water. The grea...
-Miscellaneous Receipts. Part 4
Preserving The Color Of Dresses The colors of merinos, mousseline-de-laines, ginghams, chintzes, printed lawns, etc, may be preserved by using water that is only milk-warm; making a lather with white...
-Miscellaneous Receipts. Part 5
Put the veil into a strong lather of white soap, and very clear water, and let it simmer slowly for a quarter of an hour. Take it out and squeeze but not rub it. Rinse it in two cold waters, with a dr...
-Miscellaneous Receipts. Part 6
How To Take Impressions Of Butterflies' Wings Clip the wings of the butterfly. Lay them on clean paper, in the form of a butterfly, when flying. Spread some thick clean gum water on another piece of ...
-Miscellaneous Receipts. Part 7
If you draw patterns on cloth or muslin, do it with a pen dipped in a bit of stone blue, a bit of sugar, and a little water, mixed smooth in a teacup, in which it will be always ready for use, if fres...
-Common Simple Dyes
How To Dye Black Allow a pound of logwood to each pound of goods that are to be dyed. Soak it over night in soft water, then boil it an hour, and strain the water in which it is boiled. For each poun...
-Common Simple Dyes. Part 2
Slate-Colored Dye To make a good dark slate color, boil sugar-loaf paper with vinegar in an iron utensil - put in alum to set the color. Tea-grounds, set with copperas, make a good slate color. To pr...
-Common Simple Dyes. Part 3
Rheumatism Rheumatism is improperly regarded as an inflammatory affection of the joints. The pains and inflammation there stand in the same degree to the disease as the pustules or the scarlet erupti...
-Syrups For Soda And Mineral Water
Sarsaparilla Take of simple syrup-four pints; compound syrup of sarsaparilla, four fluid ounces; caramel, one and a half fluid ounces; oil of wintergreen and sassafras, of each, six drops. Lemon Gr...
-The Young People's Illustrated Bible History
Embellished With Numerous Costly Steel And Other Engravings. A Very Popular Work, Which Is Meeting With Great Success. Also The Illustrated History of the Holy Bible, by Dr. John Kitto, F.S.A., edited...
-An Illustrated History Of The Holy Bible
BEING A CONNECTED ACCOUNT OF THE REMARKABLE EVENTS AND DISTINGUISHED CHARACTERS CONTAINED IN THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS, AND IN JEWISH HISTORY DURING THE FOUR HUNDRED YEARS INTERVENING BETWEEN THE ...
-The New Cyclopedia of Domestic Economy And Practical Housekeeping
A DAPTED to all classes of society; comprising subjects connected with the inter-ests of every family, such as - DOMESTIC EDUCATION, HOUSES, FURNITURE, DUTIES OF MISTRESS AND DOMESTICS, THE STOREHOUS...
-The History Of The Civil War In America
(ISSUED IN THE ENGLISH AND GERMAN LANGUAGES,) COMPRISING A Full and Impartial Account of the Origin and Progress of the Rebellion, of the various Naval and Military Engagements, of the Heroio Deeds...
-Illustrated History Of Washington And His Times: Embracing A History Of The Seven Years' War, The Revolutionary War
THE FORMATION OF THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION, AND THE ADMINISTRATIONS OF WASHINGTON, EXHIBITING THE DARING EXPLOITS AND HEROIC ENDURANCE OF THE NOBLE PATRIOTS WHO WON OUR LIBERTIES AND ESTABLISHED OUR IN...
-A Pictorial History Of The New World: Containing A General View of All The Various Nations, States, And Republics Of The Western Continent
Comprising the early Discoveries by the Spanish, French, and other Navigators, an account of the American Indians, and a COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE PRESENT TIME. Including the Frenc...
-Poultry And Game
Turkey The cock bird when young has a smooth black leg with a short spur. The eyes bright and full, and moist supple feet when fresh; the absence of these signs denotes age and staleness; the hen may...
-Meat Soups
1. - Stock For White Soups This is a soup, the foundation of which is veal, - the knuckle, the scrag, or calf's head being the best meat for the purpose, - an old fowl, a little ham, or bacon, mutton...
-13. - Soup Italienne - 18. - Gravy Soup
13. - Soup Italienne Cut the meat from a knuckle of veal, break up the bones and make a broth of them, cut half a pound of ham in slices and lay them at the bottom of a stewpan; upon them the meat fr...
-20. - Harico Soup - 27. - Cottage Soup
20. - Harico Soup Cut some mutton cutlets from the neck; trim and fry them of a light brown; stew in brown gravy soup till tender. Have ready some carrots, turnips, celery, and onions; fry them in bu...
-30. - Sago Soup - St. - Hessian Soup
30. - Sago Soup Take three pounds of lean beef, a slice of lean ham, and lay them in a stewpan with a lump of butter, draw the gravy gently, add two quarts of water, and a sliced onion which has been...
-38. - Soup A La Reine Victoria - 43. - Winter Soup
38. - Soup A La Reine Victoria Take a pound and a half of lean veal, place it in a stewpan with a slice of bacon, which must not be fat, an onion with one clove, a blade of mace, a head of celery, a ...
-44. - Hotch Potch. (English.) - 61. - Scotch Barley Broth
44. - Hotch Potch. (English.) Put a pint of peas into a quart of water, boil them until they are so tender as easily to be pulped through a sieve. Take of the leanest end of a loin of mutton three po...
-52. - Giblet Soup - 57. - Mullagatawnee
52. - Giblet Soup Scald and clean thoroughly two sets of goose giblets or twice the number of duck giblets, cut them in pieces, put them in three quarts of stock; if water is used instead of stock ad...
-Soups Of Game, Poultry, Etc. 58. - Venison Soup. (English.) - 70. - Hare Soup
Soups Of Game, Poultry, Etc. 58. - Venison Soup. (English.) Take four pounds of freshly killed venison cut off from the bones, and one pound of ham in small slices. Add an onion minced, and black pep...
-71.- Hare Soup, Ok Wild Duck Soup - 75. - Savory Jelly
71.- Hare Soup, Ok Wild Duck Soup Take a brace of Canadian hares or of wild ducks, and cut them up. Cook one moderately in an earthen pot with as much water as will cover it; some cloves, salt and bl...
-76. - Partridge Soup - 82. - Potage A La Julienne-(Julien Soup.)
76. - Partridge Soup When you have a brace of partridges which prove to be remarkably old, convert them into soup. Skin and cut them up, cut a handsome slice of ham as lean as possible and divide it ...
-83. - The Julienne With Consomme-(Or Broth Of Fowl.) - 89. - Macaroni Soup
83. - The Julienne With Consomme-(Or Broth Of Fowl.) The same as above, only you moisten it with consomm of fowl, and put in the back of a roasted chicken, from the preceding day, which stew with the...
-90.- Soup A La Creci, Or Carrot Soup - 95. - Potato Soup Maigre
90.- Soup A La Creci, Or Carrot Soup Cut half a pound of lean ham in dice, three onions, four turnips, twelve carrots, the outer side red only, a head of celery, a fagot of sweet herbs, two blades of...
-96. - Tomato Soup - 101.- Saute Soup
96. - Tomato Soup Wash, scrape, and cut small the red part of three large carrots, three heads of celery, four large onions, and two large turnips; put them into a saucepan with a table-spoonful of b...
-102.- Spring Soup - 105. - Lobster Soup
102.- Spring Soup As saute; the same roots cut differently, and add, if to be had, spinach, cabbage-lettuce, a very little sorrel, as it turns acid on the stomach, all cut rather small, tarragon, che...
-106. - Lobster Soup - 111. - Oyster Soup
106. - Lobster Soup To one large hen lobster scalded and cleaned, take two quarts of strong calf's feet broth; pound the shells, small claws, eggs, fat and coral in a mortar, and simmer three hours i...
-112. - Oyster Soup - 116 . - Clam Soup
112. - Oyster Soup Take fifty oysters, blanch them, but do not let them boil; strain them through a sieve, and save the liquor. Put one-quarter pound of butter into a stewpan; when it is melted, add ...
-117. - Clam Soup, (Prepared By A Dublin Lady.) - 122. - To Boil Cod Fish
117. - Clam Soup, (Prepared By A Dublin Lady.) Put forty or fifty clams, in the shells, with as little water as possible. When the liquor has run out from the opened shells, take the clams out and ch...
-124. - Cod Sounds. - Ragout - 130. - Whiting And Gbatin
124. - Cod Sounds. - Ragout The sounds should not be much soaked, but thoroughly cleaned. Simmer them for a short time, broil them, having first floured them; when they are just tender, stew them in ...
-131. - Halibut - 136. - To Dress Dried Haddock
131. - Halibut Halibut should be cut into slices of four pounds each, and may be baked or fried. The skin on the back must be scored. When baked, use a sufficient quantity of butter to keep it moist....
-137. - To Dress Haddock - 143. - Potted Herring
137. - To Dress Haddock Clean them very thoroughly, and take off the heads and the skin; put them into boiling, water, throw in two moderate-sized handfuls of salt; let them boil as fast as possible,...
-145. - Mackerel - 152. - To Cook Carp
145. - Mackerel Are generally served up plain boiled; put them in a kettle containing enough boiling water according to the number, well salted; let simmer nearly half an hour, take them up, drain, a...
-153. - To Cook Trout. (Frank Forrester's Method.) - 157. - Pike
153. - To Cook Trout. (Frank Forrester's Method.) This is the method of the woods, and in the woods I learned it: The trout must be cooked in the open air, by a wood fire on the ground, or a charcoal...
-158. - To Fey Smelts - 164.-Smelts. - (English)
158. - To Fey Smelts Dry them slightly in a cloth, and dip them in flour; then have half an ounce of butter or clear fat melted in a basin, into which break the yolk of two eggs, with which rub the s...
-165. - To Bake Smelts - 171.- Trout A La Twickenham
165. - To Bake Smelts Prepare as above, and instead of strewing forcemeat over them, employ only bread crumbs, and moisten with clarified butter; mix in addition to the gravy a glass of Madeira, with...
-172. - Trout Stewed - 179. - To Bake Salmon
172. - Trout Stewed This is a pleasing and delicate fish when nicely stewed. It is dressed very much in the fashion of other small fish stewed, only that it requires perhaps more care in the differen...
-180. - Salmon, Plain Boiled - (Soyer.) - 185. - To Dry Salmon
180. - Salmon, Plain Boiled - (Soyer.) I prefer always dressing this fish in slices from an inch to two inches in thickness, boiling it in plenty of salt and water about twenty minutes; the whole fis...
-186. - To Pickle Salmon. - The Newcastle Method - 190. - Collared Salmon
186. - To Pickle Salmon. - The Newcastle Method Put any quantity of salmon into an earthen jar; cover it with equal parts of good vinegar and water; add cayenne pepper and salt in proportion to the ...
-192. - Eels Bread Crumbed - 200. - To Stew Lobsters
192. - Eels Bread Crumbed Cut into pieces same length as above, cleaned nicely and well dried; let them be coated with yolk of egg, powdered with bread crumbs; fry them brown; serve with parsley and ...
-201. - Boiling Lobsters - 206. - Lobsters, In An Italian Salad
201. - Boiling Lobsters Put the lobsters into boiling water, with a little salt, and boil them till they are cooked through; the color of the shell is of importance, and is made bright by rubbing ...
-208. - Anchovies, Essence Of - 218. - Soft Shelled Crabs
208. - Anchovies, Essence Of A pound of the best anchovies, two quarts of water, two bay-leaves, some whole pepper, a little scraped horseradish, a little thyme, two blades of mace, six shalots ...
-219. - Terrapins - 223. - To Scallop Oysters
219. - Terrapins Put them in boiling water to kill them; then skin them and take off the nails, wash and put them on again to boil, adding a teaspoon of salt to every two. When tender, remove the ...
-224. - To Scallop Oysters - 229. - Oyster Rolls
224. - To Scallop Oysters For one hundred oysters, take four eggs, boiled hard, and chopped very fine; mix them with a sixpenny loaf crumbled or grated, and add pepper and salt to taste. Put some of ...
-230. - Oyster Sausages - 235. - Breaded Oysters
230. - Oyster Sausages May also be made of the larger kind, bearded and minced small, together with a moderate quantity of beef suet and bread-crumbs, to which should be added a forcemeat of pounded ...
-236. - Stewed Oysters - 242. - Fish Turtle. (English.)
236. - Stewed Oysters The oysters should be bearded and rinsed in their own liquor, which should then be strained and thickened with flour and butter, and placed with the oysters in a stewpan; add ...
-244. - Fish Cake - 250. - A Vol-Au-Vent
244. - Fish Cake Cut the meat from the bones, put them, the head and fins, over the fire to stew for gravy, with a pint of water, an onion, herbs, popper, and salt. Mince the meat, put to it one-...
-251. - Stewed Fish, Hebrew Fashion - 257. - Anchovy Sauce
251. - Stewed Fish, Hebrew Fashion Take three or four parsley-roots, cut them into long thin slices, and two or three onions also sliced, boil them together in a quart of water until quite tender; ...
-258. - Fennel Sauce - 264. - Lobster Sauce Simplified
258. - Fennel Sauce This is a sauce principally used for boiled mackerel. Make the same quantity of melted butter as in the last, to which add a good tablespoonful of chopped fennel; it is usually ...
-265. - Lobster Sauce. - (French Receipt.) - 269. - Matelote Sauce
265. - Lobster Sauce. - (French Receipt.) A hen lobster is indispensable for this sauce. Put some of the spawn of the fish into a mortar, to be pounded very fine; add to it a small bit of butter. ...
-2t0. - Matelote Sauce Simplified - 277. - Shrimp Sauce
2t0. - Matelote Sauce Simplified Proceed as above respecting the onions, only add a fourth more butter, and fry them a little browner; then add a glass of sherry and two teaspoonfuls of flour, which ...
-279. - Beef Gravy - 285. - Gravy - Clear
279. - Beef Gravy Cut a piece of the cheek or neck into pieces; strew some flour over it; mix it well with the meat, and put it into the saucepan with as much water as will cover it; an onion, a ...
-287. - Curry Powder. (Kitchiner's Tried Receipt.) - 296. - Maltre D'Hotel Butter
287. - Curry Powder. (Kitchiner's Tried Receipt.) Dry and reduce to a fine powder the following spices: Coriander-seed, three ounces, Turmeric, three ounces, Black pepper, one ounce, Mustard, one ...
-297. - To Brown Melted Butter - 304. - Horseradish Sauce
297. - To Brown Melted Butter Put a lump of butter into a frying-pan, and toss it round over the fire until it becomes brown; then dredge some flour over it, which has been also browned by putting ...
-305. - Queen Mary's Sauce - 312,-Oyster Sauce
305. - Queen Mary's Sauce Take a shoulder of mutton that has hung till it is tender. When three parts roasted, put a soup-plate under it, with three spoonfuls of hot water, the same of port wine, a ...
-313. - Sauce, Harevy - 320. - Fennel Sauce
313. - Sauce, Harevy Chop twelve anchovies, bone and all, very small, with one ounce of cayenne pepper, six spoonfuls of soy, six ditto of good walnut pickle, three heads of garlic chopped not very ...
-321. - Fresh Pork Sauce - 826. - Bechamel Sauce
321. - Fresh Pork Sauce Cut two or three good-sized onions into slices, and fry them lightly, then add two spoonfuls of cullis, a little broth, a few mushrooms chopped, a clove of garlic, vinegar, ...
-827. - Dutch Sauce. - (French Receipt.) - 333. - Bread Sauce
827. - Dutch Sauce. - (French Receipt.) Put into a stewpan a teaspoonful of flour, four spoonfuls of elder vinegar, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, the yolks of five eggs, and a little salt. ...
-334. - Bechamel Sauce - 339. - Sauces For White Poultrt. Boiled
334. - Bechamel Sauce Take some veal and ham, cut them into dices; some carrots, cloves, onions, laurel leaves, shalots, parsley, and seal-lions, all chopped fine; pepper, grated nutmeg, a little ...
-340. - White Sauce - 348. - Sauce For Fricandeau, Or Roast Veal
340. - White Sauce Boil a large blade of mace, a few cloves and peppercorns, in half a pint of soft water, until the flavor be obtained; strain it off, put it into a saucepan with four anchovies ...
-349. - Sauce A La Maltre D'Hotel - 356. - Currant Sauce
349. - Sauce A La Maltre D'Hotel Put eight table-spoonfuls of white sauce in a stewpan with four of milk; boil it five minutes, then stir in three ounces of maitre d'h6tel butter; stir it quickly ...
-357. - Sauces For Wild-Fowl. (English.) - 366. - Mince Herb Sauce
357. - Sauces For Wild-Fowl. (English.) A teaspoonful of made mustard, the same of essence of anchovies and red pepper; a tablespoonful of ketchup, and a glass of claret. This receipt is from the ...
-367. - Robert Sauce. (Soyer's.) - 376. - Papillotte Sauce
367. - Robert Sauce. (Soyer's.) Peel and cut up two good-sized onions; put them in a stewpan with an ounce of butter, till they are a nice yellow color; then add eight table-spoonfuls of demi-glaze, ...
-377. - Tomato Sauce. (Soyer's.) - 385. - Spinage Puree
377. - Tomato Sauce. (Soyer's.) If fresh, put six in a stewpan; having removed the stalk, and squeezed them in the hand to remove pips, etc, add half an onion, sliced, a sprig of thyme, a bay-leaf, ...
-386. - India-Pickle Sauce - 394. - Sauce A La Sainte Menehould
386. - India-Pickle Sauce Take some gravy, thicken with flour and butter; cut in small dice some India-pickle, add a little of the vinegar, let it boil up, throw in the dice and serve hot. This is ...
-395. - La Magnonnaise - 402. - The Cullis-(A Brown Jelly.)
395. - La Magnonnaise Perhaps the most esteemed mode of making sauce for any sort of cold meats or fish is that known in France by this title. Put into a round-bottomed basin the yolk of an egg and ...
-403. - Sauce Tournee - 411. - Tomatoes, Garniture Of
403. - Sauce Tournee Take some white thickening, dilute it with some consomme or broth of fowl; neither too thin nor too thick. A sauce when too thick will never admit of the fat being removed. Let ...
-412. - Tomato Sauce A L'Ital1enne - 421. - Udder
412. - Tomato Sauce A L'Ital1enne Take five or six onions, slice, and put them into a saucepan with a little thyme, bay-leaf, twelve tomatoes, a bit of butter, salt, half a dozen allspice, a little ...
-423. - Panada For Fish Quenelle, Ok Forcemeat - 430. - Forcemeat
423. - Panada For Fish Quenelle, Ok Forcemeat Put two-thirds of half a pint of water into a stewpan holding a quart, with nearly one ounce of butter; when boiling, stir in a quarter of a pound of ...
-431. - For Hare, Or Any Thing In Imitation Of It - 436. - Rissoles Of All Kinds
431. - For Hare, Or Any Thing In Imitation Of It The scalded liver, an anchovy, some fat bacon, a little suet, some parsley, thyme, knotted marjoram, a little shalot, and either onion or chives, all ...
-437. - Eggs For Turtle - 445. - Foecemeat Ingeedients
437. - Eggs For Turtle Beat three hard yolks of eggs in a mortar, and make into a paste with the yolk of a raw one; roll it into small balls, and throw them into boiling water for two minutes to ...
-446. - Foecemeats, Etc - 456. - Fillet Of Beef
446. - Foecemeats, Etc Cold fowl, veal, or mutton. Scraped ham, or gammon. Fat bacon, or fat ham. Beef suet. Veal suet. Butter. Marrow. Soaked bread, and crumbs of bread. Parsley and white ...
-457. - Rump Of Beef - 466. - Beef Steaks, Beoiled
457. - Rump Of Beef If of a well-fed ox, and hung till tender, this is one of the most juicy and best flavored of all the joints of beef, but is more frequently stewed than roasted. It is generally ...
-467. - The English Dish Of Beef Steak And Onions - 471. - Beef Steaks A La Parisienne
467. - The English Dish Of Beef Steak And Onions Pound the steak, season, and fry it in a saute or fryingpan; then dredge flour over it, and add, by degrees, a cup of boiling water with more ...
-473. - Beef Palates - 479. - To Dress Beef Tongues
473. - Beef Palates Take as many as required, let them simmer until they peel, put them in a rich gravy, stew until very tender, season with cayenne, salt, two teaspoonfuls of mushroom ketchup - ...
-480. - A Family Stew Of Beef - 486. - Hung Beef
480. - A Family Stew Of Beef Take any piece of beef good for stewing, cut it into small pieces, slice two or three large onions, and put them into the stewpan with two ounces of butter or good beef-...
-487. - Beef Hung - 494. - Bubble And Squeak
487. - Beef Hung The best piece is the navel piece, it must be hung up in a cellar until it is a little damp, but not long enough to change, take it down and wash it well in brown sugar and water, ...
-495. - Bubble And Squeak - 501. - An Excellent Wat Of Preparing Tongues To Eat Cold
495. - Bubble And Squeak Cut slices from a cold boiled round or rump of beef; let them be fried quickly until brown, and put them into a dish to be kept hot. Clean the pan from the fat; put into it ...
-502. - To Roast A Beef Tongue - 507. - Cow-Heels
502. - To Roast A Beef Tongue Take a fine large fresh tongue, scald it, and take off the skin; cut it off at the root and trim it neatly; stick a few cloves here and there in it, and put it in a ...
-508. - To Fry Ox-Feet, Or Cow-Heel - 515. - Fillet Of Beef Braised
508. - To Fry Ox-Feet, Or Cow-Heel After preparing them as above, cut them into small pieces; have ready some bread finely crumbled, dip the pieces into the yolk of an egg beaten up, and roll them ...
-516. - Beefsteak A La Francaise - 522. - Alamode Beef. (Kitchiner's Receipt)
516. - Beefsteak A La Francaise Must be cut either from the sirloin or some other prime part of the beef, as rump steaks are not known in France. Pour over it two large spoonfuls of the best Lucca ...
-523. - A Fricandeau Of Beef - 531. - Stewed Rump Of Beef
523. - A Fricandeau Of Beef Take a nice piece of lean beef; lard it with bacon very closely; put it into a stewpan with a pint of broth, a glass of white wine, a bundle of parsley, all sorts of ...
-532. - Hunters Beef - 536. - Broiled Bones
532. - Hunters Beef Hang for three days a round of beef of twenty pounds; at the expiration of that time rub it with brine composed of three ounces of saltpetre, twelve ounces of salt, a spoonful of ...
-537. - Tripe, Lyons Fashion - 543. - Another Method
537. - Tripe, Lyons Fashion When there is any remaining from a previous day, dry it on a clean cloth; cut them into pieces an inch square; put into an omelette or saute pan one or two ounces of ...
-544. - Minced Beef - 551. - Remains Of Salt Beef
544. - Minced Beef Cut a pound and a half of lean cooked beef into very small dice, which put upon a plate; in a stewpan put a good teaspoonful of finely chopped onions, with a piece of butter of ...
-552. - Cold Beef - 558. - Pressed Beef
552. - Cold Beef If any be left from a previous dinner, put it in a dish, placing the meat in the centre, rather higher, cover over with some delicate mashed potatoes, about two inches in thickness, ...
-559. - Pickle For Beef A La Garrick - 565. - Bubble And Squeak. (New Receipt.)
559. - Pickle For Beef A La Garrick Take twenty pounds of salt, three-quarters of a pound of saltpetre, four cakes of sal prunella, two pounds of moist sugar, two cloves of garlic, with which rub ...
-566. - Lobscous - 571. - Fillet of Veal, Boiled
566. - Lobscous Mince, not too finely, some cold roast beef or mutton. Chop the bones, and put them in a saucepan with six potatoes peeled and sliced, one onion, also sliced, some pepper and salt; ...
-573. - To Roast - 578. - Loin Of Veal Boiled
573. - To Roast A fillet of veal, it should be stuffed with the following ingredients: thyme, marjoram, parsley, savory, finely minced lemon-peel, mace, pepper, nutmeg, with bread-crumbs; to which ...
-579. - Knuckle Of Veal - 585. - Neck Of Veal Stewed
579. - Knuckle Of Veal Get a knuckle of a leg of veal, saw it in three parts, but not to separate it, scald it, and put it for a few minutes in cold water, then place it in a stewpan with some good ...
-586. - Breast Of Veal Forced - 592. - Veal Cutlets Curried
586. - Breast Of Veal Forced After taking out the tendons and all the rib bones, trim the veal, spread it all over with forcemeat, sprinkle over, if you have got it, a little chopped truffle or ...
-594. - Veal Cutlets - A La Maintenon - 598. - Olives Of Veal-Roti
594. - Veal Cutlets - A La Maintenon Half fry your cutlets, dip them in a seasoning of bread-crumbs, parsley, sha-lots, pepper and salt, and the yolk of an egg; enclose them in clean writing paper, ...
-599. - Potted Veal - 603. - Hashed Veal
599. - Potted Veal This may be potted as beef, or thus:-pound cold veal in a mortar, work up with it in powder mace, pepper, and salt, shred the leanest part of tongue very finely, or ham is ...
-605. - To Dress Collops Quickly - 609. - Cutlets And Celery
605. - To Dress Collops Quickly Cut them as thin as paper with a very sharp knife, and in small bits. Throw the skin, and any odd bits of the veal, into a little water, with a dust of pepper and ...
-610. - A L'Italienne - 618. - Calf's Head Cheese
610. - A L'Italienne Chop a quantity of sweet herbs, parsley being predominant; melt a little butter on the fire and then warm the herbs in it; cut the cutlets into handsome shapes, brush them with ...
-620. - Fricandels - 626. - Calf's Heart Baked
620. - Fricandels Take three pounds of the best end of a loin of veal, chop the fat and lean together very fine; then soak a French roll in some milk; beat three eggs; add pepper, salt, nutmeg, and ...
-628. - Queues De Veau - 636. - To Dress Calf's Heart
628. - Queues De Veau Having nicely cleaned and soaked four calves' tails, cut off the small ends, and blanch them; dry, flour, and fry them a fine brown in butter; drain the fat from them, and ...
-637. - Sweetbreads - 644. - Croquettes
637. - Sweetbreads For every mode of dressing, sweetbreads should be prepared by blanching, or rather parboiling them. They may be larded and braised; and, being of themselves rather insipid, they ...
-645. - To Roast Sweetbreads - 649. - Escalopes De Ris De Veau Aux Pois, Or Scollops Of Sweetbreads With Green Peas
645. - To Roast Sweetbreads Sweetbreads should be soaked in warm water, and then blanched by being thrown into boiling water, boiled for a few minutes, and then put into cold water. They may then be ...
-650. - Foie De Veau A La Poele, Or Scollops Of Calf's Liver With Fine Herbs - 654. - Hashed Calf's Head
650. - Foie De Veau A La Poele, Or Scollops Of Calf's Liver With Fine Herbs Take a nice calf s liver as white as possible, cut it into slices of a good and equal shape. Dip them in the flour, and ...
-657. - Ris De Veau En Caisses - 661. - Another
657. - Ris De Veau En Caisses Blanch three sweetbreads, and simmer m a strong, well flavored gravy till quite done. Have ready three round pieces of white paper oiled, and lay them thereon; having ...
-662. - Veal Rolls - 668. - The Turkish Mode
662. - Veal Rolls Are cut from any cold joint, or prepared in the same manner from the raw meat. Cut thin slices, and spread on them a fine seasoning of a very few crumbs, a little chopped or ...
-669. - Curry Of Veal - 672. - To Stuff A Leg Of Mutton
669. - Curry Of Veal Cut part of a breast of veal in moderate sized pieces, put it in a stewpan with an onion and a shalot sliced fine, a slice of lemon, one ounce of butter, a little parsley and ...
-673. - To Dress A Leg Of Mutton With Oysters - 679. - Leg Of Mutton Braised
673. - To Dress A Leg Of Mutton With Oysters Parboil some fine well-fed oysters, take off the beards and horny parts; put to them some parsley, minced onion, and sweet herbs, boiled and chopped fine,...
-680. - To Send A Leg Of Mutton Neatly To Table Which Has Been Cut For A Previous Meal - 689. - Neck Of Mutton
680. - To Send A Leg Of Mutton Neatly To Table Which Has Been Cut For A Previous Meal Too much must not have been cut from the joint or it will not answer the purpose. Bone it, cut the meat as a ...
-690. - Steaks From A Loin Of Mutton - 701. - Fillet Of Mutton Stewed
690. - Steaks From A Loin Of Mutton Are done in the same way, only trimming some of the fat off. Cut thick and stew instead of frying them. 691. - Mutton Steaks The steaks are cut from the thick ...
-702. - Fillets In Marinade - 708. - Hashed Mutton
702. - Fillets In Marinade Cut from the loins of mutton; prepare some carrots, turnips, onions, and celery, thyme, mace, cloves, and whole pepper; cut up in thin slices; boil a little vinegar and ...
-709. - Irish Stew - 715. - Mutton Like Venison
709. - Irish Stew Cut a neck of mutton as for the haricot; blanch the chops in water; take and put them into another stewpan with four onions cut in slices; put to it a little of your second stock, ...
-716. - To Make A Scotch Haggis - 722. - Cotelettes A La Maintenon. (Ude's Receipt.)
716. - To Make A Scotch Haggis Take the stomach of a sheep. The washing and cleaning is of more consequence than all, as it will be of a bad color and a bad taste if not well cleansed; when clean, ...
-724. - Another, And A Much Better Method Of Preparing Outlets A La Soubise - 728. -Cotelettes Aux Haricots Verts
724. - Another, And A Much Better Method Of Preparing Outlets A La Soubise Cut the mutton chops a little thicker than when you wish to broil them. Pare them nicely, and put them into a stew-pan, ...
-729. - Scrags Of Mutton A La 8ainte Menehould - 733. - Mutton Rumps And Kidneys
729. - Scrags Of Mutton A La 8ainte Menehould Order the narrow part of a neck of small mutton to be cut off before the sheep be divided; which leaves the two scrags united. Soak in warm water, then ...
-736. - Sheep's Tails And Tongues - 742. - A Scotch Haggis
736. - Sheep's Tails And Tongues Take three tails and three tongues, cut the tails in half and split the tongues. Stew them gently for three hours in as much water as will cover them, adding three ...
-743. - The English Mode Is - Lamb. 748. - Fore-Quarter Of Lamb
743. - The English Mode Is To mince the heart, the tongue, the kidneys, and a part of the liver of the sheep, with a third of its weight in fat bacon, two anchovies chopped small, and the crumb of a ...
-749. - Saddle Of Lamb - 756. - Stewed Loin Of Lamb
749. - Saddle Of Lamb Roast it quickly, but be very careful neither to scorch it nor to take it from the fire until it is done; baste with the fat and gravy which fall from it, and in an hour and ...
-758. - Saddle Of Lamb, Russian Fashion - 766. - Lamb's Head With Hollandaise
758. - Saddle Of Lamb, Russian Fashion Roast a small saddle of lamb, keeping it pale; having had it covered with paper, take ten good-sized boiled potatoes, mash them with about two ounces of butter,...
-767. - Lamb's Head With Brain Or Liver - 773. - Chevaux-De-Frise Lamb
767. - Lamb's Head With Brain Or Liver Blanch the brain or liver, and mince them as for sheep's head, introducing only the yolk of an egg; mix with a little milk, stir in quickly, add a table-...
-774. - Chevaux-De-Frise With Lamb Sweetbreads - 780. - Sweetbreads Fricasseed, Brown
774. - Chevaux-De-Frise With Lamb Sweetbreads Do the same as before; when it is done and glazed, have ready some good lamb sweetbreads, about six larded ones and glazed, put them on the top between ...
-781. - To Stew Sweetbreads-Ris De Veau - 788. - Lamb's Head And Emincees
781. - To Stew Sweetbreads-Ris De Veau Make a forcemeat of the tenderest parts of boiled or roast fowl, some bacon, a little parsley chopped, a little thyme, lemon-peel, the yolks of two eggs, ...
-789. - Sheep Or Lambs' Trotters - 797. - A Leg Of Pork Roasted
789. - Sheep Or Lambs' Trotters Get a dozen or two of trotters, stew them for several hours, until all the bones will come from them; save this liquor; do not break the skin; stuff them with good ...
-798. - A Leg Of Pork Boiled - 807. - Mock Goose, Or Leg Of Pork Roasted Without The Skin
798. - A Leg Of Pork Boiled After having been salted, it should be washed in clean cold water, and scraped thoroughly white and clean preparatory to cooking; it should then be put into a floured ...
-808. - Chine Of Pork - 815. - Pork Cutlets
808. - Chine Of Pork Generally used at Christmas. This, when properly cured, is mostly used cold; boil it in a cloth, with a sauce of red cabbage, or sauer kraut if cold; garnish with parsley. 809. ...
-816. - Pork Cutlets - 821. - Saucisses A L'Espagnole
816. - Pork Cutlets Cut them from a small delicate loin of pork, bone, and trim them neatly, fry them a light brown, put into a small stewpan a little vinegar, and eschalot chopped very finely, two ...
-822. - Pork Sausages - 829. - White Sausages
822. - Pork Sausages Chop, particularly fine, about two or three pounds of lean pork, and an equal quantity of fat; have ready some sage, either dry or green, either passed through a sieve or ...
-831. - To Collar A Pig's Head - 838. - Pigs' Feet Stewed
831. - To Collar A Pig's Head Clean thoroughly, and put it in pickle for a week, boil it tender, then take out the bones carefully, turn the upper part of one cheek to the snout of the other cheek, ...
-839. - Pigs' Feet And Ears Fried - 844. - Black And White Puddings
839. - Pigs' Feet And Ears Fried They must be well cleaned, and boiled until tender, and laid in vinegar and water, with salt in it, until they are required for use; to prepare them for cooking, cut ...
-845. - To Melt Lard - 850. - Economical Dish
845. - To Melt Lard Take the inner fat of a newly killed pig and strip off the skin completely and carefully, slice it and put it into a jar, a sprig of rosemary may be placed with it, and set the ...
-851. - To Cure A Ham - 857. - Ham Gravy
851. - To Cure A Ham For a ham of sixteen pounds, take a pound and a half of common salt, with an ounce of saltpetre. Leave it some days, then put in one pound of molasses; let the ham lie a month ...
-858. - To Boil Mutton Ham - 866. - To Bake A Ham
858. - To Boil Mutton Ham Put it on the fire in cold water; let it warm quickly, and allow it to boil only twenty minutes; then leave it in the pan of water till cold. This plan renders it moist, ...
-868. - To Braise A Ham In The French Fashion - 873. - To Boil Bacon
868. - To Braise A Ham In The French Fashion . It is prepared for cooking in the same manner as in the preceding receipt, but when cleaned it is placed upon a layer of new hay, which has previously ...
-874. - Bacon, To Broil - 880. - Pigs' Kidneys
874. - Bacon, To Broil Make up a sheet of paper in the shape of a dripping-pan, cut your bacon into thin slices, cut off the rind, lay the bacon on the paper, put it over the gridiron, set it over a ...
-884. - Prussian Cutlets - 891. - An Excellent Sausage To Eat Cold
884. - Prussian Cutlets Take a piece of veal, say one pound, from any part of the calf, free from nerve, with a little fat, chop it up. but not too fine, add to it two teaspoonfuls of chopped ...
-892. - Oyster Sausages - 897. - White Puddings
892. - Oyster Sausages Take one pound of veal and a score of oysters bearded, then pound the veal very finely in a mortar with a little suet, season with a little pepper, soak a piece of bread in ...
-898. - How To Make Quenelles of Forcemeat - 905. - The Dutch Way To Salt Beef
898. - How To Make Quenelles of Forcemeat Have two table-spoons, dessert or teaspoons, according to the size you intend making quenelles; fill one of them with the forcemeat; dip the other spoon ...
-906. - Spiced Beef - 914. - Mutton Ham
906. - Spiced Beef Make a brine with half a pound of salt, half an ounce of saltpetre, half a pound of sugar, thirty cloves, as many allspice and black peppercorns, six bay-leaves; crack the spice; ...
-915. - Goose Hams - 924. - Tc Pickle Pork
915. - Goose Hams Are made by splitting the goose down the back, rubbing it with a quarter of an ounce of saltpetre, and then salting it well with common salt and coarse brown sugar; let it lie in ...
-926. - Potting And Collaring - 933. - Beef Potted
926. - Potting And Collaring To pot and collar are only different modes of preserving fish and meat for a longer time than they could be kept fresh; chiefly, in the instance of potting, by pounding ...
-934. - Beef Potted Like Venison - 938. - Pigeons Potted
934. - Beef Potted Like Venison Take a whole thin flank of beef, pull off the inward skin, and cut it across and across, particularly in the thickest parts, lay it for six hours in hard water, take ...
-939. - Smelts Potted - 944. - Ham Cake
939. - Smelts Potted Draw out the inside, season with salt, mace pounded, and pepper; lay them in a pan with butter on the top, bake them; when nearly cold take them out. lay them on a cloth, put ...
-945. - To Pot Musheooms - 949. - An Economical Way
945. - To Pot Musheooms Choose large buttons, or those in which the inside is not yet the least brown; peel and wipe out the fur of the larger ones; and to every two quarts put half a drachm of ...
-950. - To Collar Calf's Head - 955. - A Marinade For Collared Meats
950. - To Collar Calf's Head Scald the skin of a fine head, clean it nicely, and take out the brains. Boil it tender enough to remove the bones; then have ready a .good quantity of chopped parsley, ...
-956. - To Salt Or Corn A Round of Beef - 965. - Turkey With Sausage Meat
956. - To Salt Or Corn A Round of Beef Rub into it a pound and a half of salt, dried before the fire; then put it into a salting-pan, set it in a cool place, and the brine that melts should be ...
-967. - Turkey Boiled - 973. - Turkey With Flat Sausage Cake
967. - Turkey Boiled A hen bird is considered the best. It may be stuffed with truffles, chestnuts, or sausage meat. Boil it in a clean floured cloth; throw some salt into the water in which it is ...
-Fowls - 981. - Fowls, Forced
Fowls Fowls, in a general sense, mean all kinds of poultry; but, in a limited view, one species of bird. We distinguish this kind in cookery, as the chicken, capon, pullet, cock, and hen. Chickens fr...
-982. - Roast Fowls - 986. - Fried Fowl
982. - Roast Fowls If nicely trussed, make a stuffing with butter and some pepper, dry up the butter with bread-crumbs, baste it well, and flour and salt before you take it from the fire. If ...
-988. - To Broil A Fowl - 995. - Curried Chickens
988. - To Broil A Fowl Split the fowl down the back; season it very well with pepper, and put it on the gridiron with the inner part next the fire, which must be very clear. Hold the gridiron at a ...
-996. - To Braise Chickens - 1002. - Larks Or Small Birds
996. - To Braise Chickens Bone the chickens, stuff them with forcemeat, place in the stewpan the bones and trimmings: lay the chickens upon them with a braise of sweet herbs, onions, mace whole, ...
-1003. - Guinea Fowls - 1009. - Dumpokht
1003. - Guinea Fowls These birds must be very young, for, being naturally very dry, they are not eatable if more than twelve months old; they are generally larded, and served plain roasted, rather ...
-1010. - Turkey Giblets A La Bour- Geois - 1016. - Stewed Duck And Peas
1010. - Turkey Giblets A La Bour- Geois The giblets consist of pinions, feet, neck, liver, and gizzard; scald, and put them into a stewpan with a piece of butter, parsley, scallions. garlic, thyme, ...
-1017. - Duckling With Turnips - 1026. - To Make Rabbit Taste Much Like Hare
1017. - Duckling With Turnips Is a very favorite dish among the middle classes in France. Proceed as in the last, but instead of peas use about forty pieces of good turnips cut into moderate-sized ...
-1027. - To Roast Hare - 1035. - Venison Steaks
1027. - To Roast Hare After it is skinned, let it be extremely well wiped; and, if old, lard it, which will make it tender, as will also letting it lie in vinegar. If, however, it is put into ...
-1036. - To Hash Venison - 1044. - New Potatoes
1036. - To Hash Venison Carve your venison into slices: let them be thin, and put them in a stewpan with two small glasses of port wine: add a spoonful of browning, one of ketchup, an onion stuck ...
-1045. - Potato Flour - 1049. - To Brown Potatoes
1045. - Potato Flour Rasp the potatoes into a tub of cold water, and change it repeatedly until the raspings fall to the bottom like a paste; then dry it in the air, pound it in a mortar, and pass ...
-1050. - Potato Rissoles - 1058. - Asparagus
1050. - Potato Rissoles Boil the potatoes floury; mash them, seasoning with salt and a little cayenne; mince parsley very finely and work up with the potatoes, adding eschalot also chopped small; ...
-1059. - Asparagus Loaves - 1064. - Cauliflower Dressed Like Maccaroni
1059. - Asparagus Loaves Boil three bunches of asparagus; cut off the tops of two bunches when tender, leaving two inches of the white stalk on the rest, and keeping it warm; stew the tops in a pint ...
-1065. - Spinach - 1072. - To Serve Sour-Kraut
1065. - Spinach Pick it clean, and wash it in five or six waters. Drain it, and put it in boiling water. Ten minutes is generally sufficient time to boil spinach. Be careful to remove the scum. When ...
-1074. - Jerusalem Artichokes - 1080. - Pone Of Sweet Potato
1074. - Jerusalem Artichokes Pare them after being well washed, very smooth and of some kind of shape, boil them in milk and water, pay great attention to them, as, if not taken up the minute they ...
-1081. - Squashes Or Cymbelins - 1088. - Tomatoes
1081. - Squashes Or Cymbelins Cut up the squashes in pieces of an inch thick, having first pared the squash; if old, extract the seeds and boil the pieces until they break, mash them with a spoon, ...
-1089. - Scolloped Tomatoes - 1095. - Beans, Puree Of, White
1089. - Scolloped Tomatoes Scald ripe tomatoes and peel them; put them in a dish with bread crumbs, layer over layer, seasoning with salt and red pepper. Have the bread crumbs on the top, and bake ...
-1097. - Haricot Roots. Pare Three Turnips, And Scrape Two Or - 1102. - Cabbage-To Boil
1097. - Haricot Roots. Pare Three Turnips, And Scrape Two Or three good-colored carrots, about two dozen button onions, a head of celery; cut out with a scoop-cutter sufficient carrots and turnips ...
-1103. - Stewed Water-Cress - 1111. - Sidney Smith's Receipt For Salad
1103. - Stewed Water-Cress The following receipt may be new, and will be found an agreeable and wholesome dish:- Lay the cress in strong salt and water, to clear it from insects. Pick and wash ...
-1112. - Chicken Salad - 1120. - Lobster Salad
1112. - Chicken Salad Mince the meat of two cooked fowls, with a little ham or tongue; cut up fine a nice lettuce head; put it in a dish, with the chicken in the centre; for the dressing, take the ...
-1122. - Gaelic Pickle - 1127. - To Pickle Radish-Pods
1122. - Gaelic Pickle Steep one quarter of a pound of ginger in strong salt and water for five days, then cut it into slices and dry it in the sun; put it into a large stone jar with a gallon of the ...
-1128. - To Pickle French Beans - 1133. - Celery, To Pickle
1128. - To Pickle French Beans Gather them before they become stringy, and, without taking off the ends, put them into a very strong brine until they become yellow; drain the liquor from them, and ...
-1134. - To Pickle Cauliflowers - 1142. - Peaches And Apricots
1134. - To Pickle Cauliflowers Take the closest and whitest cauliflowers you can get, and pull them in bunches, and spread them on an earthen dish, and lay salt all over them, let them stand for ...
-1143. - To Pickle Green Peppers - 1149. - Artichokes Pickled
1143. - To Pickle Green Peppers The peppers must be pickled when half ripe, and the smallest ones chosen. Make a small hole at the top and another at the bottom of the pepper, and extract the core ...
-Vinegars. 1150. - Vinegar For India Pickle - 1156. - Raspeerry Vinegar
Vinegars. 1150. - Vinegar For India Pickle Prepare a gallon of vinegar, more or less, according to the quantity of pickles to be done, in the following manner:- Mix gradually one-quarter of a pound ...
-1157. - Sugar Vinegar - 1168. - Tomato Ketchup
1157. - Sugar Vinegar To every gallon of water put two pounds of coarse brown sugar. Boil and skim this. Put it to cool in a clean tub; when about lukewarm, add a slice of bread soaked in fresh ...
-1170. - Camp Ketchup - 1183. - Meat Pies, Patties, Etc
1170. - Camp Ketchup Take two quarts of old strong beer and one of white wine, add a quarter of a pound of anchovies, three ounces of shalots peeled, half an ounce of mace, the same of nutmeg, three ...
-1184. - Seasoning For Raised Pies - 1192. - Rumpsteak Pie
1184. - Seasoning For Raised Pies Three pounds of salt dried and pounded, three ounces of white pepper, half an ounce of cayenne pepper, two ounces of cloves, two ounces of allspice, one ounce of ...
-1193. - Veal And Ham Pie - 1199. - Rabbit Pie
1193. - Veal And Ham Pie Cut about a pound and a half of veal into thin slices, as also a quarter of a pound of cooked ham; season the veal rather highly with white pepper and salt, with which cover ...
-1200. - Pigeon Pie - 1204. - Eel Pie
1200. - Pigeon Pie Line the bottom of a pie-dish with a pound of rumpsteak, cut into slices not too thin, seasoned with a little salt, pepper, and cayenne, and dipped into flour; have ready picked ...
-1206. - Mutton Pudding - 1211. - Rabbit Pudding
1206. - Mutton Pudding Line a pudding-basin with paste, as directed in the last; then have ready cut into slices the meat from two loin-chumps of mutton, which Jay upon a dish, and season with a ...
-1212. - Oyster Pie - 1216. - Fish Pudding
1212. - Oyster Pie As you open the oysters separate them from the liquor, which strain; parboil sweetbreads, and, cutting them in slices, lay them and the oysters in layers; season very lightly with ...
-1217. - Veal Pie In A Dish - 1223. - Game Pie
1217. - Veal Pie In A Dish First of all get all your ingredients ready, namely, hop, parsley, shalots, or onions, mushrooms, pepper and salt, mint, four eggs boiled hard, a little good second stock, ...
-1224. - Snipe Pie - 1229. - Feench Pie
1224. - Snipe Pie Bone three snipes, fill them with a light forcemeat, adding the trails and some truffles pounded, put the birds in a deep dish, with a small layer of forcemeat all round; cover ...
-1230. - Vegetable Pie - 1234. - Veal And Oyster Pie
1230. - Vegetable Pie Scald and blanch some broad beans; cut young carrots, turnips, artichoke-bottoms, mushrooms, onions, lettuces, parsley, celery, and add peas; or use any of them you may have. ...
-1236. - Calf's-Head Or Calfs-Foot Pie - 1242. - To Make A Pasty Of Beef Or Mutton To Eat Like Venison
1236. - Calf's-Head Or Calfs-Foot Pie Either must be well stewed before being put into the pie. They must be cut into nice pieces, free from bone, and well seasoned, or otherwise they will be ...
-1243. - Yorkshire Goose Pie - 1250. - Codfish Pie
1243. - Yorkshire Goose Pie Bone a goose, a fowl, and a pigeon; season them well with pepper, taking care to cover the whole of the interior, or otherwise it will turn sour before it can be eaten; ...
-1251. - A Remarkably Fine Fish Pie - 1261. - Cocoa-Nut Pie
1251. - A Remarkably Fine Fish Pie Boil two pounds of small eels; having cut the fins quite close, pick the flesh off, and throw the bones into the liquor with a little mace, pepper, salt, and slice ...
-1262. - A Plain Custard Pie - 1270. - To Make A Simnel
1262. - A Plain Custard Pie Boil a quart of milk with half a dozen peach leaves, or the rind of a lemon. When they have flavored the milk, strain it, and set it where it will boil. Mix a table-...
-1273. - Lent Pies - 1282. - To Prepare Cranberries for Tarts
1273. - Lent Pies Boil a dozen eggs quite hard, and chop the yolks very fine; chop also a dozen of moderate-sized juicy apples, peeled and cored, together with two pounds of stoned raisins; add two ...
-1284. - Tartlets Of Almond Paste - 1291. - Patties With Curds
1284. - Tartlets Of Almond Paste Butter some tartlet-moulds, and after having spread the paste on the dresser, cut it with a cutter to the size of the moulds; put a little sweetmeat in the middle, ...
-1292. - Cheesecakes - 1297. - Almond Cheesecakes
1292. - Cheesecakes Strain the whey from the curd of two quarts of milk; when rather dry crumble it through a coarse sieve, and mix with 6ix ounces of fresh butter, one ounce .of pounded blanched ...
-1299. - Cheesecake-Stock, That Will Keep for Several Years - 1306. - Beefsteak Pudding
1299. - Cheesecake-Stock, That Will Keep for Several Years To a quarter of a pound of butter put one pound of loaf-sugar broken into small pieces, six eggs, leaving out two whites, the rind of three ...
-1307. - Plum Porridge - 1311. - Herb Pudding
1307. - Plum Porridge Boil eight pounds of shin of beef for five hours in a gallon of water, skimming carefully throughout, and finally straining off the liquor; add two pounds of meat cut small. ...
-1312. - Goose Pudding - 1318. - Boston Pudding
1312. - Goose Pudding Half a pound of bread-crumbs soaked in a little boiling milk, when cold, add two or three eggs, a little salt, pepper, marjoram, and thyme, a spoonful of oatmeal, a good ...
-1319. - Almond Pudding And Sauce - 1325. - Hasty Pudding
1319. - Almond Pudding And Sauce A large cupful of finely-minced beef suet, a teacupful of milk, four ounces of bread-crumbs, four ounces of well cleaned currants, two ounces of almonds, half a ...
-1326. - Hasty Pudding - 1332. - Rice Milk
1326. - Hasty Pudding Boil water, a quart, three pints, or two quarts, according to the size of your family; sift your meal, stir five or six spoonfuls of it thoroughly into a bowl of water; when ...
-1333. - Bird's Nest Pudding - 1340. - Indian Pudding
1333. - Bird's Nest Pudding If you wish to make what is called bird's nest puddings, prepare your' custard,- take eight or ten pleasant apples, pare them, dig out the core, but leave them whole, ...
-1341. - A Baked Bread Pudding - 1347. - Cocoa-Nut Pudding
1341. - A Baked Bread Pudding This is a very excellent dish when properly mixed. Crumble half a loaf of bread, a stale loaf is preferable, and cut up the crust as small as possible. Boil a quart of ...
-1348. - An Apple Charlotte - 1354. - Vermicelll
1348. - An Apple Charlotte Pare and slice a quantity of apples; cut off the crust of a loaf, and cut slices of bread and butter. Butter the inside of a pie dish, and place bread and butter all round;...
-1355. - Muffin And Crumpet Pudding - 1361. - A Sweetmeat Pudding
1355. - Muffin And Crumpet Pudding A very delicate pudding may be made in a short time from a couple of muffins and three crumpets, placed alternately in layers, and either boiled or baked in batter....
-1362. - Orange Pudding - 1368. - Miroton Of Apples
1362. - Orange Pudding May be made with six ripe oranges, large, juicy, of the best kind, and peeled; the rinds to be beaten in a mortar with half a pound each of fresh butter and moist sugar, to ...
-1369. - To Make Batter For Fruit Pup-Dings - 1374. - Timbale De Macaroni
1369. - To Make Batter For Fruit Pup-Dings Put half a pound of flour and a salt-spoonful of salt into a pan, add very gently half a pint of milk; if mixed carelessly the flour will remain in lumps; ...
-1375. - Pate De Macaroni - Rice
1375. - Pate De Macaroni Stew some macaroni in butter and water, or broth, strain it, cut it into pieces, and lay it at the bottom of the dish, adding ham balls, made of ham, pounded in a mortar, ...
-1378. - Rice Fritters - 1385. - Croquettes Of Rice With Apei-Cot Marmalade
1378. - Rice Fritters Pare very thin the rind of a lemon, and boil it in milk, with sugar enough to sweeten it, and a cup of rice. When the rice is quite soft take out the lemon peel, beat up the ...
-Cheese - 1395. - Stewed Cheese
Cheese Cheese takes an important place at the table; not alone, in its simple place at the close of the dinner, but that it forms the foundation of many excellent dishes. The selection of good cheese...
-1396. - Welsh Rabbit - 1403. - Dutch Pancakes
1396. - Welsh Rabbit Put mellow cheese into a saucepan with about one ounce of butter and a very little ale; stir it over the fire until the cheese is quite dissolved; then take it off, add an egg ...
-1404. - Crepes - 1415. - Plain Baked Eggs
1404. - Crepes Make a batter with flour, milk and eggs, adding brandy and orange-flower water. In two or three hours afterwards, melt a piece of butter or lard, the size of a walnut, in a frying-pan,...
-1416. - Randalled Eggs - 1428. - To Make Yeast
1416. - Randalled Eggs Twelve eggs boiled hard and halved; cut a piece from the ends of half of them to allow them to stand, take out the yolks, chop them, and mix chopped boiled ham or tongue, ...
-1429. - Milk Yeast - 1436. - Rolls
1429. - Milk Yeast To a pint of new milk put a teaspoon-ful of salt or a large spoonful of flour; stir well, and keep it lukewarm by the fire; in an hour it will be fit for use. Twice as much must ...
-1437. - Rocks - 1442. - Rice Cakes
1437. - Rocks Take a loaf that is half baked, pull it apart, and with two forks tear the crumb into bits about the size of a walnut; lay them on a tin, and return them to the oven, and bake of a ...
-1443. - Flannel Cakes And Waffles - 1449. - Bannock Or Indian Meal "Cakes
1443. - Flannel Cakes And Waffles Stir into two pints of flour as much milk as will make a light batter. Melt a large lump of butter and add with it a little salt. Beat together five eggs and stir ...
-1450. - Rusk - 1455. - Milk Toast
1450. - Rusk Melt four ounces of butter in half a pint of new milk; then add to this seven eggs, well beaten, a quarter of a pint of yeast, and three ounces of sugar; put this mixture, by degrees, ...
-1457. - Tops And Bottoms - 1464. - Plum New England Wedding Cake
1457. - Tops And Bottoms Make a dough as for rusks, but using only half the butter; have a deep-edged baking-sheet well buttered, and when the dough is ready, turn it on to a dresser, well floured; ...
-1465. - Frosting Cakes - 1472. - Honey Cake
1465. - Frosting Cakes Allow for the white of one egg nine heaping teaspoonfuls of double-refined sugar, and one of nice starch. The sugar and starch should be pounded and sifted through a very fine ...
-1473. - Cocoa-Nut Cakes - 1478. - New-Year's Cookies
1473. - Cocoa-Nut Cakes Take equal weights of grated cocoa-nut and powdered white sugar, (the brown part of the cocoa-nut should be cut off before grating it,) - add the whites of eggs beaten to a ...
-1479. - New York Cup Cake - 1486. - The Housewife's Christmas Cake
1479. - New York Cup Cake One cup butter, two of sugar, three of flour, one of milk or cream; four eggs, a wine-glass of brandy - a nutmeg grated, a teaspoonful of soda, two of cream of tartar. ...
-1487. - Cornstarch Cake - 1500. - Seed Cakes
1487. - Cornstarch Cake Half a pound of sugar, four ounces of butter, five eggs, one teaspoonful cream of tartar, half a teaspoonful of soda, half a pound of cornstarch, half a gill of sweet milk. ...
-1501. - Pitcaithly Bannock - 1506. - Frangipane
1501. - Pitcaithly Bannock Dry before the fire one pound fine flour; then melt half a pound of butter; then mix with the flour two ounces of almonds thinly sliced; two ounces of orange peel, two ...
-1507. - La Galette - 1513. - Hard Gingerbread
1507. - La Galette Is in great favor among the Parisians, who usually eat it with sweetmeats, but vary it in point of richness by the greater or less quantity of cream and butter employed in making ...
-1514. - Ginger Bread-Nuts - 1522. - Kisses
1514. - Ginger Bread-Nuts Mix half a pound of flour, the same quantity of butter and of brown sugar, with three ounces of ginger, a teaspoon-ful of carbonate of soda rubbed in the flour, with as ...
-1523. - Macaroons - 1528. - Cheesecakes
1523. - Macaroons Blanch and skin half a pound of sweet almonds, dry them well in your screen, then put them into a mortar with a pound and a half of lump sugar, pound well together, and pass the ...
-1529. - Soyer's Queen Victoria's Cake - 1535. - Cheesecakes, Citron
1529. - Soyer's Queen Victoria's Cake To three-quarters of a pound of flour, add half an ounce of yeast, mixed with warm water until forming a stiff paste, and place it in a stewpan, and let it ...
-1536. - Cheesecakes, Lemon - 1544. - Clouted Cream
1536. - Cheesecakes, Lemon Take four ounces of sifted lump sugar and the same quantity of butter; melt them slowly, add the yolks of two and the white of one egg, a sponge cake, some blanched ...
-1545. - Charlotte Russe. (Furnished For This Work By Mr. Taylor, Proprietor Of Taylor's Splendid Establishment, Broadway, New York.) - 1550. - Gooseberry Or Apple Trifle
1545. - Charlotte Russe. (Furnished For This Work By Mr. Taylor, Proprietor Of Taylor's Splendid Establishment, Broadway, New York.) Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in half a pint of milk, and add ...
-1551. - Syllabub - 1558. - Rice Flummery
1551. - Syllabub Mix a quart of cream with half a pint of sherry wine, and sweeten it to taste, adding essence or grated rind of lemon, and, if desired, the juice of the fruit. Churn or beat the ...
-1560. - Gooseberry-Fool - 1572. - Tea Cream
1560. - Gooseberry-Fool Put the fruit into a stone jar, with white sugar; set the jar on a stove, or in a saucepan of water over the fire; if the former, a large spoonful of water should be added to ...
-1570. - Cocoa - 1575. - Pine-Apples
1570. - Cocoa An excellent breakfast beverage may be made by simply pounding the nut-which is the substance of chocolate - and boiling it in the same manner in either water or milk. Cocoa Shells or ...
-1576. - Tait Pine-Apple - 1584. - Goosebeeries
1576. - Tait Pine-Apple To fourteen pounds of grated pineapple add half an ounce of grated alum, and mix thoroughly. Boil seven pounds white sugar in as little water as possible, skimming it until ...
-1585. - Currant Jelly, (Red) - 1590. - Cranberry Jelly
1585. - Currant Jelly, (Red) Strip off the currants, put them in a jar, set the jar in a kettle of hot water, let it boil an hour, then throw the currants and juice into a fine lawn sieve, press out ...
-1591. - To Preserve Strawberries, Raspberries, And Blackberries, Whole - 1599. - Orange Marmalade
1591. - To Preserve Strawberries, Raspberries, And Blackberries, Whole The strawberries should be gathered fresh from the vines. Select the largest, and those perfectly unbroken. Mash up the others ...
-Jams
1600. - Raspberrry Take equal weights of fruit and moist sugar; put them on the fire together; keep stirring and breaking the fruit till the sugar melts, then boil it till it will jelly on a plate. ...
-1606. - Raspberry Cakes - 1613. - To Keep Tomatoes
1606. - Raspberry Cakes Take any quantity of fruit you please, weigh and boil it, and when mashed, and the liquor is washed, add as much sugar as was equal in weight to the raw fruit. Mix it very ...
-1614. - To Preserve Green Corn - To Clarify Sugar
1614. - To Preserve Green Corn Fill a strong tin canister with the corn, solder it tightly, place it in boiling water, and allow it to remain several hours. The top and bottom will swell, and the ...









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