books



previous page: Every Woman's Encyclopaedia 4
  
page up: Household Books
  
next page: The Profession Of Home Making | by Chicago American School Of Home Economics

The Home Cyclopedia Of Cooking And Housekeeping | by Charles Morris



A book of practical recipes for the kitchen, for the nursery, for the sewing-room - how to make delicious dishes for the table - useful recipes for the care of furniture and carpets, clothing and house utensils - suggestions for home decoration and the care of flowers and pet animals. A model cook book.

TitleThe Home Cyclopedia Of Cooking And Housekeeping
AuthorCharles Morris
PublisherW.E. Scull
Year1902
Copyright1902, W.E. Scull
AmazonHome Cyclopedia of Necessary Knowledge

Book IV

The Home Cyclopedia Of Cooking And Housekeeping

Edited and Arranged by ALICE A. JOHNSON,

Graduate in Domestic Science, at Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa.

And With

Special Recipes and Illustrations Prepared for this Work by Janet Mckenzie hill,

Editor of the Boston Cooking School Magazine. H. C. Pros.

-The Art Of Cooking
The section of the house which is most rarely seen by the visitor is the one which is most necessary to his comfort and that of the family. While the drawing-room, the library, the dining-room, and ot...
-The Kitchen Fire
To make a fire in a stove or range, take off the covers, brush out the ashes and knock all clinkers from the sides of the fire box. Open all the dampers. Bring shavings or paper, wood and coal. Cover ...
-Soups and Their Preparation
In making soup uncooked meat should always serve as the basic element. Cracked bones of cooked game or of rare beef and mutton may be added if desired, but the juices derived from raw meat can alone b...
-Soups and Their Preparation. Part 2
Veal Soup Put a three-pound knuckle of veal into three quarts of cold water, with salt and one small tablespoonful of uncooked rice. Boil slowly for three hours, or until the liquor is reduced to hal...
-Soups and Their Preparation. Part 3
Ox Tail Soup Boil two ox tails three to four hours, season with salt, black pepper and a small piece of ripe pepper pod. Add one-half cup barley, previously soaked in cold water three hours, a cup of...
-Soups and Their Preparation. Part 4
Clam Soup Take twenty-five clams, and chop fine. Put over the fire the liquor that was drained from them, pour in a cup of water, and let boil ten minutes ; then add the chopped clams, and boil half ...
-Soups and Their Preparation. Part 5
Green Pea Soup Put the empty pods of a half peck of peas into a gallon of water, and boil for an hour. Then strain, put in four pounds of chopped beef, and boil slowly an hour and a half. Then add th...
-Soups and Their Preparation. Part 6
Tomato Soup Stew a quart of peeled tomatoes until soft, strain, and add a pinch of soda. Set over the fire again, adding a quart of hot milk; season with salt and pepper, a piece of butter the size o...
-Fish
The variety of edible fish is very considerable, most of them being wholesome and nutritious. Yet white-fleshed and red-fleshed fish, oily fish, shell-fish, etc., differ widely in their properties. In...
-Fish. Part 2
Boiled Fresh Codfish Before cooking, soak in slightly salted water for half an hour. Then wipe dry, and wrap in a linen cloth, dredged with flour, and sew up the edges. Tut into the kettle, with plen...
-Fish. Part 3
Baked Whitefish Clean the fish and cut off the head, if preferred; cut out the 378 backbone to within two inches of the tail, and stuff the fish with the following mixture : Soak stale bread in water...
-Fish. Part 4
Breakfast Mackerel Soak the fish over night, next morning put in a skillet in cold water. Let come to a boil and pour off water, add more and let come to a scald; take up, spread over with butter, dr...
-Shell Fish
Of shell-fish the oyster is the general favorite among epicures and everyday people alike. It is more wholesome eaten raw than when cooked, the flesh being coagulated and hardened by cooking. The leas...
-Shell Fish. Part 2
Scalloped Oysters Crush several hand-fuls of crackers, and put a layer in the bottom of a buttered dish, wetting it with a mixture of the oyster juice and milk. Then place a layer of oysters, seasone...
-Shell Fish. Part 3
Clam Chowder For this take fifty clams, a bowl of salt pork, cut up fine, and one of onions, finely chopped, with the same or a greater quantity of potatoes cut into small pieces. Fry the perk very g...
-Poultry and Game Birds
The term poultry includes chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Its flesh is lighter in color than that of other animals, but it is very nourishing. The flesh of ducks, geese, and many wild birds is mu...
-Poultry and Game Birds. Part 2
Turkey Or Chicken Dressing Crum-ble one loaf of bread fine, soften with melted butter, cover closely, let stand from half to one hour, then add salt, pepper and a little sage and onions, mix thorough...
-Poultry and Game Birds. Part 3
Broiled Chicken Be sure that your chicken is young. If in doubt as to this, it is best to make it tender by steaming. Place sticks across a dripping pan full of boiling water, lay the chicken upon th...
-Poultry and Game Birds. Part 4
Smothered Chicken Singe a young chicken and split it down the back; take out the intestines; wipe it with a damp towel; lay the chicken with inside downward in the baking pan, breaking the breastbone...
-Poultry and Game Birds. Part 5
Broiled Game Partridges, split in the back, and broiled over a bright fire, with a dressing of salt, pepper and butter, make an excellent dish. Care must be taken not to cook them too fast, or the sa...
-Meats
What we call flesh is chiefly composed of muscle, with a certain proportion of fat and a considerable quantity of water. A piece of fresh beef, thoroughly dried, will lose three-fourths of its weight....
-Modes of Cooking Meats
Meat may be boiled, roasted, stewed, fried, or prepared in other ways. Tender cuts should be cooked in their own juices to preserve the flavor. The meat should at first be subjected to a high temperat...
-Beef
Roast Beef The sirloin and rib pieces of the beef are the best for roasting - the latter for small families. Have the butcher remove the bone and skewer the meat into a round shape. It is better, in ...
-Beef. Part 2
English Stew Cut meat in slices, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and flour. Lay in a dish, and put a few pickles or a small quantity of pickled cabbage over the meat. Take half a teacup of water, add a l...
-Beef. Part 3
Boiled Corned Beef Skewer your piece into shape, wash it in three or four waters, and tie it up with stout twine. Cover it in a pot with cold water. In boiling, give about twenty minutes to a pound, ...
-Mutton
Roast Leg Of Mutton Remove the bone from a leg of mutton and mix a filling as follows : one cup rolled cracker or bread crumbs, and one teaspoonful each of salt and sage, with sprinkle of pepper. Mix...
-Pork
Roast Pork Prepare pork by washing. Score the skin in lines, forming little squares. Have a moderately hot oven ; baste with its own drippings ; season with salt and pepper. The time required depends...
-Pork. Continued
Pork Steaks Remove the skin and trim neatly. Broil over a brisk fire. Season after taking up with pepper, salt, a little sage and minced onion. Cover and set in the oven for five minutes. Spare ribs ...
-Venison
Venison Cutlets Trim your cutlets nicely, using the trimmings to make gravy, I in the proportion of half a pound to a cup of ater. Put in bones, fat, etc., and let stew in a saucepan while you prepa...
-Hashes and Sandwiches
Potato And Meat Pie Chop cold meat fine, removing the bones, fat and gristle. Put the meat into a pudding-dish, measuring it to find the quantity. To each cup of meat pour one-third cup of gravy or s...
-Hashes and Sandwiches. Part 2
Roast Venison Wash and drv with a cloth. Butter a sheet of white paper and put over the fat. Put in roasting pan with a little boiling water. Cover closely; cook in a moderately hot oven for two or t...
-Hashes and Sandwiches. Part 3
Salmon Sandwiches One can of salmon chopped fine, one cup bread crumbs, one egg, one tablespoonful of melted butter; season with salt and pepper; mix well, and put in two greased one-pound baking pow...
-Hashes and Sandwiches. Part 4
Pickled Eggs One pint of strong vinegar, one half pint cold water, a tea-spoonful each of cinnamon, allspice and mace; boil eggs till very hard, remove shell; put on the spices tied in a white muslin...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation
In the cooking of vegetables it should be borne in mind that all woody tissues, whether in the roots or stalks, the husks or skins, are nearly devoid of nutriment and quite indigestible ; they should,...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 2
Creamed Potatoes Cut four cold potatoes into cubes or slices, and put them, with a half cup of milk, into a pan or double boiler ; cook till they have absorbed nearly all the milk. Add two tablespoon...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 3
Stewed Tomatoes Pour boiling water on them to loosen the skins; peel and cut up, extracting all hard and unripe parts. Stew in a saucepan half an hour ; then add salt and pepper, a teaspoonful white ...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 4
Sour-Crout Barrels having held wine or vinegar are generally used in which to prepare sour-crout, but it is better to have a special barrel for the purpose. Slice white and firm cabbages into fine sh...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 5
Baked Corn To two cups of chopped corn (either fresh or canned) add two beaten 398 eggs, one-half teaspoonful salt, speck of pepper, one tablespoonful melted butter, and two cupfuls scalded milk. Bak...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 6
Green Peas Take fresh peas, hull them, put in pan in cold water for half an hour, and cook twenty or thirty minutes in small quantity of boiling water. Drain, season with pepper and salt and plenty o...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 7
Stewed Salsify Or Oyster-Plant ^ Scrape the roots and place in cold water, to prevent discoloration. Cut in inch-long pieces. Cover with hot water in a saucepan and boil tender. Then pour off most o...
-Vegetables and Their Preparation. Part 8
Stewed Pumpkin Cut in two, remove the seeds, slice, and pare. Soak for an hour in cold water, then put in boiling water and stew gently, stirring often. When the pieces grow tender and break, drain a...
-Milk and Cheese
Milk should be kept covered with a cloth to prevent it from absorbing impurities from the air. It should be sterilized for babies and young children ; especially during warm weather. Vessels used for ...
-Sauces and Salads
Drawn Butter Take one and one-half teaspoonfuls flour, make of it a thin paste with cold water, and stir it into a teacupful of hot water. Bring to a boil, and add by degrees two ounces of butter, st...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry
Bread is one of the most important articles of diet. It is made of flour, salt, water, and yeast. The flour best adapted for bread-making is that from wheat, because it will produce the most appetizi...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry. Part 2
Wheat Bread Take a cup of lukewarm milk, or of water with a teaspoonful of butter, a quarter cake yeast dissolved in a quarter cup of lukewarm water, or a quarter cup of liquid yeast, flour to make a...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry. Part 3
Graham Bread Mix the sponge or batter, using a pint of lukewarm water, half a teaspoonful salt, half yeast cake and one cup flour. When light, stir in three tablespoon-fuls molasses and beat until it...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry. Part 4
Corn Bread Beat thoroughly two eggs - whites and yolks separately. Mix two heaping cupfuls of Indian meal and one cupful of flour, adding a teaspoonful of melted lard and milk enough to make a thin b...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry. Part 5
Parker House Rolls Scald a pint of milk, melt in it while warm a piece of butter the size of an egg, add a tablespoonful of sugar, a pinch of salt, and a cupful of yeast. Add flour to make soft dough...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry. Part 6
English Crumpets To a quart of warm milk, add half a cup of yeast, a tea-spoonful of salt, and flour enough to make a stiff batter. When light, rub in half a cupful of melted butter, a teaspoonful of...
-Bread, Biscuit and Pastry. Part 7
Wheat Muffins One pint sour milk, one-fourth teaspoonful soda, one and one-half teaspoonfuls baking powder, one-half teaspoonful salt, one teaspoonful sugar, one tablespoonful butter, one beaten egg,...
-Cereals
In cooking cereals use plenty of water. Be careful to cook cereals thoroughly. Cereals should be cooked in a double boiler, to prevent scorching. Avena Or Rolled Oats Put one and one-half cups of ...
-Cakes and Cake-Making
General Directions for Making Cakes. - For cakes which contain butter, cream the butter, warm slightly if hard, add sugar gradually, and beat. When smooth add the yolks of eggs or whole eggs (beaten ...
-Cakes and Cake-Making. Part 2
Lemon Cake Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, three cups flour, whites of four eggs, one lemon, grated rind and juice, three teaspoonfuls baking powder ; beat the eggs to a stiff fro...
-Cakes and Cake-Making. Part 3
Ice Cream Cake One cup butter, beaten to a cream, two cups punverized sugar. Mix sugar and butter and beat until light, add one cup sweet milk, three full cups flour, and three teaspoonfuls baking po...
-Cakes and Cake-Making. Part 4
Soft Gingerbread One-half cup of lard, one cup each of milk and sugar, two of molasses, one teaspoonful soda, two tablespoonfuls cinnamon, and one of ginger. Stir butter, sugar, molasses and spice to...
-Cakes and Cake-Making. Part 5
Lemon Crackers Two and one-half cups soft sugar, one cup lard, one pint sweet milk, two eggs, five cents' worth baking ammonia, two cents' worth lemon oil. Dissolve ammonia in the milk, or in a littl...
-Custards and Creams
Cup Custard Scald one pint milk. Beat two eggs, add the milk, sprinkle of salt and two tablespoonfuls sugar, and stir until the sugar dissolves. If desired, a little nutmeg may be added. Pour into cu...
-Custards and Creams. Continued
Small Custard Beat one egg, one heaping teaspoonful sugar; one-half pint milk. Put in cup, set in vessel of boiling water and bake. Baked Custard Four well-beaten eggs, one half cup of sugar,...
-Puddings and Sauces
Cabinet Pudding Cream together a. quarter pound butter and a pound and a half* of sugar. Add the beaten yolks of five eggs, and a half pound of flour moistened with a cup of milk, alternately with th...
-Puddings and Sauces. Part 2
Baked Indian Pudding Mix together half cup corn meal, quarter cup flour, one egg, quarter cup New Orleans molasses, with a little salt, ginger and cinnamon. Stir these into three cups of hot milk. Ba...
-Puddings and Sauces. Part 3
Cup Pudding Make a batter as for waffles ; to one pint of milk allow two eggs and enough flour to thicken, one teaspoonful baking powder, stirred in the flour. Butter a sufficient number of teacups a...
-Pies and Pastry
Pie-Crust One cup shortening, three cups flour; little salt, rub the flour, shortening and salt all well together. Use enough cold water to hold all together, no more. Handle as little as possible. C...
-Pies and Pastry. Continued
Pumpkin Pie Take a quart of stewed pumpkin, which has been pressed through a sieve; six eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, two quarts milk, a cup or more of sugar, and mace, cinnamon and nutme...
-Jellies, Jams, Etc
Apple Jelly Slice nice clean apples in preserving kettle with enough water to almost cover. When stewed soft, strain through the jelly bag. Measure juice and boil twenty minutes. Add two-thirds as mu...
-Jellies, Jams, Etc. Part 2
Tomato Butter Scald and remove skin from nice sized tomatoes, slice and mash fine, to each quart of tomatoes add a quart of granulated sugar; let cook fast, stir until done. Lemon Butter Grate th...
-Jellies, Jams, Etc. Part 3
Canned Cling Peaches Take one quart of granulated sugar, one quart of water, let boil, add three quarts of nice smooth peaches, peeled; let boil slowly twenty minutes. This is sufficient for two quar...
-Ices and Ice Cream
General Rules Ice (or snow) and salt are necessary for freezing cream, fruit, etc. Salt melts the ice, and in melting it absorbs heat from the cream, thus causing the cream to freeze. For each cup of...
-Pickles and Salads
Gherkin Pickles Use small cucumbers or gherkins. Pack in a stone jar in layers, salting each layer thickly. Cover the top layer deep with salt, pour cold water to cover all, and weight with a board a...
-Pickles and Salads. Part 2
Tomato Pickles Slice thin one gallon green tomatoes, salt and let stand over night; next morning drain, chop one gallon cabbage, grate one quart horseradish. Put tomatoes on in vinegar, boil until te...
-Pickles and Salads. Part 3
Higdin Pickle Take one peck green tomatoes and a dozen medium-sized onions. Cut and slice these, and salt and mix together. Let them stand over night, then drain them well, and add one ounce each of ...
-Pickles and Salads. Part 4
Nut Salad Mix one cup chopped English walnut meats, with two cups celery or shredded lettuce leaves; arrange on lettuce, and serve with Mayonnaise dressing. Potato Salad Slice thin, eight cold bo...
-Pickles and Salads. Part 5
Potato Salad Boil four or six potatoes, cut in thin slices, pour the hot dressing over and let it stand until cold. Two tablespoons chopped celery may be mixed with the potatoes, and one teaspoon oni...
-Candies and Confections
Butter Scotch One cup of light brown sugar, one-half cup of hot water, a table-spoonful of butter, a tablespoonful of vinegar ; boil about twenty minutes, testing in cold water; when it begins to thi...
-Candies and Confections. Continued
Taffy Put into a pan half cup of butter, two cups brown sugar, and the juice of a lemon or. four tablespoonfuls vinegar ; stand it over a moderate fire. Stir until it begins to bubble, then draw it t...
-Beverages
Tea The water for tea should be freshly boiled. An earthenware pot should be used. Scald the pot, put in one teaspoonful tea, and pour on one cup of boiling water. Cover it and let it steep five minu...
-Dishes for the Sick
Beef Tea One pound of lean beef cut fine, put in a glass fruit jar, without water, cover tightly and set in a pot of cold water. Heat gradually to a boil and keep hot for three or four hours, until t...
-Menus for Various Occasions
Breakfast Fruit. Oat Meal. Cream and Sugar. Broiled Steak. Fried Potatoes. Biscuit. Coffee. Lunch Cold Chicken. Saratoga Chips. Apple Sauce. Wafers. Chocolate. Dinner Tomato Soup. Roast...
-Quick Meals
Breakfast Fruit. Boiled Eggs. Milk. Coffee. Toast. Dinner Beef Stew. Hashed Brown Potatoes. Sliced Tomatoes. Junket. Supper Toast and Cheese. Brown Bread. Mayonnaise of Cabbage. Tea. ...
-Table-Setting And Serving
A table should be made to look as neat and attractive as possible. Dust the table, and lay evenly on it a cloth of felt-flannel or cotton-flannel. Spread the tablecloth evenly over this. The underclo...
-Kitchen Weights and Measures
Two and one-half teaspoonfuls, one tablespoonful. Four tablespoonfuls, one wineglassful. Two wineglassfuls, one gill. Two gills, one teacupful. Two teacupfuls, one pint-Four teaspoonfuls salt, one...
-The Cellar and Store Room
Vegetables will keep best on a stone floor if the air be excluded; meat in a cold dry place where the air is freely admitted ; sugar and sweetmeats require a dry place; so does salt; dried meats, hams...
-Cuts Of Meats And Their Uses
Every housekeeper, in fact, every one who has marketing to do, should know something of the cuts of all common meats and the most desirable way each can be prepared for the table. In the illustrations...
-The Kitchen
The kitchen arrangements will depend upon many conditions, as size, shape and means of owner. But every kitchen can always be kept neat and tidy and supplied with a stove or range and usual cooking ut...
-Outside The Kitchen
The kitchen, while the humblest, is the most important section of the household, and we have accordingly given ample space to its greatly varied culinary products, and have also spoken of the etiquett...
-Diary of a Week's Work
On Monday the maid is expected to devote the morning to the heavy labor of washing; rising early, and getting the day's labors well under way before the breakfast hour. She will have, besides, the mea...
-Sweeping and Cleaning
When preparing to sweep a room, it is important to begin by dusting all the bric-a-brac and carrying it to a place of safety. The smaller articles can be placed, in a wide shallow basket kept expressl...
-Cleanliness About the House
It is very important that beds are properly aired every day. The most effectual way to do this is to throw the clothes over a chair, and lift the mattress partly over the footboard. If a feather bed i...
-Causes of Unwholesomeness
The healthiness or unhealthiness of a house depends greatly upon its degree of cleanliness. Dirty houses are always more or less unwholesome. In country places care should be taken that no puddles of ...
-Care of Floors
Floors should not be scrubbed too frequently. Once a week is generally sufficient. In damp weather wet floors dry very slowly, and the house remains damp and cold for a considerable time. It is better...
-Household Utilities
It is proposed, in the present section of our subject, to give practical advice on various questions of household utility, such as the care of clothing, the cleaning of soiled fabrics, the removal of ...
-Care of Furs, Feathers and Woolen Goods
Many things and substances are recommended for the destruction of injurious insects. Pliny says that the Romans used citron to preserve their woolen garments from moths. We have found that the insects...
-Cleaning of Lace
Fine laces should be washed as seldom as possible; but when it is necessary, most women prefer to have them washed under their own eyes. Make hot soap suds with rain water and glycerine soap. The lace...
-Cleaning Woolen Goods
Clean rose-colored cashmere by washing in cold soapsuds. If you attempt to put dye in the water, the material will be spoiled. Rinse well in cold water, and dry in the shade. To clean white serge, us...
-Colored Fabrics
Nearly all colored fabrics stain the water used to clean them, and that without losing their own brightness in any way. No article of a different color should be plunged into a wash or rinse so staine...
-Flannels
It is very important, in washing flannels to prevent shrinkage. The articles should be washed and rinsed in water of the same temperature, and not allowed to cool between. Do not rub soap on the goods...
-Care of Muslins
Muslin dresses, even of the most delicate colors, can be cleaned in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, without losing their color. Melt half a pound of soap in a gallon of water ; empty this into a ...
-Silks
Lay the silk smoothly on a clean board, rub soap upon it, and wipe it with a piece of velvet. Never brush it; the brush ruins it. ' When it has been in this manner cleansed from grease and dirt, it sh...
-Velvets
Velvet garments which have been stained, or worn, or have grown glossy, may be reno-vated so as to look new. The garment must, of course, be ripped, breadth by breadth, piece by piece. Then put burnin...
-Veils, Hats, Etc
Wash faded ribbons in cold soapsuds. Rinse, shake out, spread on the ironing-board, and cover with muslin, ironing while damp. Women in mourning frequently discard long crape veils and trimmi...
-Laundry Work
In washing clothes, dissolve pipe-clay in the water, a cent's worth to four gallons. It will be found to.clean clothing with halt the labor, and considerably less soap, while the colors of the clothes...
-The Removal of Stains
Ink stains on woolen goods and cloth may be removed with oxalic acid, diluted, or rubbed over with strong vinegar, so that it may not injure the stuff. This acid has, however, the disadvantage of bein...
-Marble and Furniture Polish
A good marble polish is the following: Melt over a slow fire four ounces of white wax, and, while still warm, stir into it an equal weight of oil of turpentine. When these are fully combined, put the ...
-Recipes for Cleaning
Steps And Flag-Stones Where there are large flights of stone steps and broad pavements of flag-stones, the process of cleaning is a tedious one. To clean with hearthstone, or caked whiting, as usual,...
-Recipes for Cleaning. Part 2
Cleaning Copper Utensils These can be given a clean, bright surface by the use of nitric acid. The desired surface is thus obtained quickly and with little trouble. But there is the objection that a ...
-Recipes for Cleaning. Part 3
To Remove Stains In Tables Wash the surface with stale beer or vinegar; the stains may then be removed by rubbing them with a rag dipped in spirits of salts. To re-polish, proceed as you would do wit...
-Household Pests
To Destroy Crickets Or Roaches Put some strong snuff in the cracks and holes in which they hide. The parings of cucumbers will, if strewn about near their holes, drive them away. Roaches devour greed...
-Other Recipes
A Simple Disinfectant Put into a saucer some fresh-ground coffee, and in its centre place a small piece of gum camphor, which set on fire with a match. As it burns add coffee enough to burn with it. ...
-Brief Recipes For Housekeepers
A little quicklime placed in the infested places will drive away any kind of ants. Burning sulphur in a tightly-closed room will kill almost all kinds of insect life and their eggs and larvae. How...
-Attractive Home Decorations. Methods For Home Use
The growing love for artistically attractive rooms, in cases where the purse does not permit free application to the upholsterer or the domestic art establishment, leads to many ingenious devices to b...
-Attractive Home Decorations. Methods For Home Use. Part 2
Decorations Used To Instil Patriotism Are The Most Commendable Of The Many Public Occasions Children's Days, Commencements and national holidays are the most popular. Flags and bunting, banks of dais...
-Attractive Home Decorations. Methods For Home Use. Part 3
Screen If your house is small and your family large, a folding-screen in each bedroom is an important addition. Very pretty and inexpensive ones may be made by covering a wooden frame with coarse can...
-Attractive Home Decorations. Methods For Home Use. Part 4
Ornamentation of Bedrooms Where there are several bedrooms, it is not unusual to furnish each one in a color of its own. One room, for instance, maybe furnished in blue and white. The walls may be hu...
-Attractive Home Decorations. Methods For Home Use. Part 5
Window Gardens Nothing adds so much cheer to the house as beautiful window gardens filled with flowers and potted plants. These decorations are within the reach of all, and there are many beautiful d...
-Fancy Work for Leisure Hours
In these days of household leisure taste in common art has developed, and we care much more than did our grandparents about surrounding ourselves with things of beauty. The struggle of life was harder...
-Embroidery
Among the most popular home occupations for present-day ladies may be named embroidery. The loom and the spinning-wheel, in one form or another, are as old as civilization, and our devotion to the emb...
-Decalcomanie
Beautiful jars, vases, umbrella holders and boxes may be made in this favorite work, for which scrap pictures are necessary. It requires taste to arrange these I tastefullv. and when well gummed, they...
-Potpourri
The potpourri just referred to may be made of various combinations of fragrant materials. A very agreeable one may be made by the following recipe for a rose-jar : One-half peck of rose leaves, one-ha...
-Wax Flowers
Wax flowers are ordinarily only clumsy imitations of the lovely blossoms which adorn our gardens, or smile upon us from lurking-places in wood or wayside, yet the artist in this work is sometimes so s...
-Flower and Fruit Molds
To take a mold for flower or fruit, mix some very fine plaster of Paris in a bowl with water, to the thickness of cream. Pour it lightly over leaf, or fruit, or bud, which it is well to place for the ...
-Phantom Leaves
Phantom or skeleton leaves are the ghostly remnants of the leaves that have waved on the trees in summer. They are troublesome to prepare, but are very pretty when finished. Gather the leaves when the...
-China Painting
For this work procure your colors in tubes, since you will thus acquire a greater variety than you would for either oil or water-color painting. The colors most in use are black, white, gray, and seve...
-Amateur Photography
To have one's picture taken was formerly a family event; now it is the work of a 456 fraction of a minute in the photographer's chair, while the art of photography is a common amusement for leisure ho...
-Screens
Our forefathers did not think their houses complete without screens. These are useful for breaking off the heat where there is an open grate, and for placing near a door often opened, to prevent a dra...
-Care of Domestic Animals and Plants
It seems advisable to supplement what we have said about the methods of making home attractive with some consideration of other important elements of home interest, the plants and flowers which change...
-Care of Canaries
In keeping canaries much attention must be paid to the cage, which is very liable to be infested with the canary mite, a plague so constant that great care is needed to avoid it. It begins with a flou...
-The Mocking Bird
Among American birds, the mocking bird stands high in public estimation. The vocal powers of this plain-plumaged favorite are extraordinary, no other species approaching it as a mimic, except its near...
-Other Song Birds
The Virginia redbird is at once beautiful in plumage and a favorite for its loud and 458 almost constant song. It is hardy, and if properly fed is liable to few ailments. It needs to be fed with seeds...
-Parrots
Among cage birds not noted for sweetness of song, yet of high popularity, may be named the gray parrot, a familiar inmate of hundreds of households, and widely welcome for the part it takes in the con...
-Pigeons
There are few pets which give so little trouble to keep and rear as pigeons, owing to the fact that they bring up and feed their young until these are old enough to provide for themselves. Cage-birds,...
-Rabbits
The rabbit is a boy's favorite, needing, of course, much more space than a bird. It can be best kept in a dry shed, ventilated at top only, and well lighted. The floors are usually of earth, but are b...
-The Belgian Hare
This interesting animal is proving to be a popular one for small investments. They are very prolific breeders, rearing several broods each season. They are larger than the common rabbit and are better...
-Other Animal Pets
Of other animals kept as pets may be named the Guinea pig and the squirrel, the former kept much like the rabbit, the latter in a cage. The squirrel in captivity is an active fellow, fond of exercise,...
-The Aquarium
The indoor aquarium is a very attractive feature in many homes, and is capable of being varied almost endlessly. It will furnish many hours of study and occupation. Its simplest form is the familiar g...
-House Plants and Flowers
Interesting as many of the cage-birds and other house pets are, the window conservatory and the flowering plant are of more value for home adornment, on account 'of the much less care needed, and thei...
-Geraniums
The geranium forms one of the most attractive of flowering plants from its rich hue and the fact that it keeps in bloom through a great part of the season. The cultivation of it is easy, almost any ki...
-Sweet Pea
This is one of the most beautiful of the summer-garden flowers, from its great variety of color and abundant bloom. It has also the charm of a sweet perfume. It supplies many shades of colored bloom -...
-Azalea
The azaleas are easily cultivated, being very hardy, and form very attractive plants. They come in many colors and also striped, spotted, or otherwise variegated. They need a light soil of sandy loam,...
-Hyacinths and Tulips
The hyacinth is an easily-cultivated plant, of which more than a thousand varieties are grown in Holland, forming an important item of that country's export trade. All Europe and the United States are...
-Pansies
The heart's-ease, or pansy, is a favorite with every one, from its beauty of color and the great variation Ialike in the form and tint of its flowers. These make their appearance early in the spring, ...
-Verbenas and Petunias
The verbena is a South American plant, which will bloom with us, in the open air, from May to November, its brilliant scarlet flowers having no superior for rich show. Endless varieties have been prod...
-The Lily and Rose
Of the lily there are numerous widely-varied species, many of them well known, any others rarely seen in gardens. It grows from a bulb, and will do well in any well-protected bed. To develop it ...
-The Latest Discovery In Science
Radium, the rarest of all elementary substances, is worth about three thousand times its weight in pure gold. It looks like ordinary table salt. Its discovery was made near the close of 1903 by Pro...

The Home Cyclopedia Of Necessary Knowledge

Embracing Five Books In One Volume

Book I. The Home Cyclopedia Of General Information

Book II. The Home Cyclopedia Of Business

Book III. The Home Cyclopedia Of History

Book IV. The Home Cyclopedia Of Cooking And Housekeeping

Book V. The Home Cyclopedia Of Health And Medicine










TOP
previous page: Every Woman's Encyclopaedia 4
  
page up: Household Books
  
next page: The Profession Of Home Making | by Chicago American School Of Home Economics