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Housekeeper's Handy Book | by Lucia Millet Baxter



While the writer was visiting friends in their country home not long ago, many questions of domestic economy came up. It was suggested that a book devoted to such matters would be of service to many housekeepers. This work is the result.

TitleHousekeeper's Handy Book
AuthorLucia Millet Baxter
PublisherHoughton Mifflin Company
Year1913
Copyright1913, Lucia Millet Baxter
AmazonHousekeeper's Handy Book

With Illustrations By Mary H. Northend

Housekeeper s Handy Book 3

To My Friends Mr. And Mrs. Ross Turner

-Preface
While the writer was visiting friends in their country home not long ago, many questions of domestic economy came up. It was suggested that a book devoted to such matters would be of service to many h...
-Cleanliness And Health
Mother Nature has given us lavishly three great helps to cleanliness: fresh air, sunshine, and water. If we neglect to use these intelligently, what can we expect but disastrous results? The care of t...
-Housekeeping Made Easier
Within a few years the study of housekeeping or domestic science has kept pace with other progressive movements. While there is still much that can be done, housework is no longer the deadly monotonou...
-Housekeeping Made Easier. Continued
Electric Utensils At present there are the electric chafing-dish, the toaster, the water-heater, the heating-pad (in place of a hot-water bottle), the small electric stove, and the electric iron, all...
-Home Sanitation
Every woman should have at command some practical knowledge of sanitation, for upon the home-maker or housekeeper rests the responsibility of creating and preserving the sanitary conditions of home li...
-Pests
Few houses are entirely free from some pest, and the housekeeper has always to be on guard; absolute cleanliness and great vigilance are necessary if one expects to be entirely free from any of them. ...
-Disinfection
After a contagious or infectious disease in a house, the housekeeper should be able to deal with the simpler means of disinfection. Always remember that killing the odor does not necessarily kill the ...
-Foreign Cooking
Fruit Soups In various foreign countries, especially in Sweden, Norway, and Germany, fruit soups are often served in summer. When combined with tapioca, cream, or milk they afford a certain amount of...
-Foreign Cooking. Part 2
Kabobs (Turkish) Cut a large onion and a large apple in thin slices. Lay on a platter or large plate with four thin strips of bacon and as many slices of cold lamb; sprinkle all lightly with pepper, ...
-Foreign Cooking. Part 3
Gullasch (Hungarian) Take three big onions to three pounds of beef, which should be cut in squares and well salted. Cut the onions quite fine, and fry in a large shallow stew-pan in oil or butter. Pu...
-Foreign Cooking. Part 4
Spanish Onion To make the onions into cups, cut out the centres; pour enough boiling water to cover, and cook five minutes; then drain. (Be careful not to cook long enough to lose the shape of the on...
-Foreign Cooking. Part 5
Italian Macaroni (1) Boil the macaroni in salted water thirty minutes. Melt in a saucepan and blend together half a cup of butter in a scant cup of tomato catsup; grate and have ready a cup of cheese...
-Foreign Cooking. Part 6
Scotch Shortbread Four rounding (not heaping) tablespoons of butter, two heaping tablespoons of sugar, ten rounding tablespoons of flour. Cream the butter, add the sugar, then the flour. Roll out; cu...
-Foreign Cooking. Part 7
English Plum Pudding Three pounds of raisins carefully stoned, three pounds of currants carefully washed and dried, one pound of sultanas, three pounds of suet chopped fine, two and a quarter pounds ...
-Salads
The old Spanish proverb tells us: To make a perfect salad, there should be a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madcap to stir the ingredients up and mix them well t...
-Salads. Part 2
Beef Salad With Green Peas Line the salad bowl with fresh, crisp lettuce leaves, add two cups of boiled or roasted beef cut in small pieces, one third of a cup of cooked peas. Season well with pepper...
-Salads. Part 3
Cream Cheese Salad (1) The cheese may be made into small balls, either white or tinted pale green (the coloring procured by chopping a little spinach and pressing). Arrange in nests of lettuce and ma...
-Salads. Part 4
Fruit Salad (2) - For Dessert Blend such fruit as you like, oranges, bananas, plums, peaches, cherries, strawberries, etc. Chill the salad bowl, rub with geranium leaves, fill with alternate layers o...
-Salads. Part 5
Onion Salad Chop (not mince) a large Spanish onion, dress it as liked best, then freeze slightly, not solidly, but just enough so that it will be cold and delightfully crisp. Onion And Bean Salad ...
-Salads. Part 6
Potato Salad Cut cold boiled potatoes into small cubes; add peas in the proportion of one cupful of peas to three potatoes; add salad dressing and stand two hours before serving. Cold beans, beets, s...
-Salad Dressings
A Simple Mayonnaise, Easily Made Put in a very cold bowl, the yolks of two fresh eggs, beat them, and stir in half a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper, two tablespoonfuls each of vinegar and lemo...
-Sandwiches
The secret of a sandwich is in the making. The bread if white should be firm, fine-grained, and surely one day old. Brown bread may be used the day it is made. To make sandwiches, melt or soften the b...
-Sandwiches. Part 2
Chicken Sandwich Spread the bread lightly with butter, then a layer of the white meat of the chicken and a small white leaf of lettuce, with a dash of mayonnaise; or chop the chicken fine and mix wit...
-Sandwiches. Part 3
Ginger Sandwich Cut preserved ginger as thin as possible, and use with white crisp leaves of lettuce between the slices of bread. Graham Bread Sandwich Equal quantities of ground raisins and waln...
-Vegetarian Food
This chapter aims to state the case for a vegetarian diet. The main objection to a meat diet is purely hygienic. Comparatively recent investigations indicate that a diet of meat makes an excess of nit...
-Time-Table For Vegetables
Shell Beans Boil half an hour to an hour. Green Corn Drop the ears into boiling water and boil from five to ten minutes, never very long. Too long a time will harden the kernels; it is wise to te...
-Soups For Vegetarians
Milk Soup Boil slowly, in two quarts of water, four potatoes and two onions; strain and mash through a colander; add one pint of milk, three tablespoonfuls of tapioca, two tablespoonfuls of butter; p...
-Meat Substitutes
Cheese Fondu Two cups of mild cheese cut in small pieces, one cup of cracker crumbs, two cups of milk, two eggs well beaten, salt, pepper, and mustard to taste. Mix and bake twenty minutes or half an...
-Meat Substitutes. Part 2
Canned Corn Fritters Beat two eggs, whites and yolks separately. Stir into the yolks two cups of milk, one cup of canned corn (chopped fine), and seasoning to taste. Thicken with flour in which is si...
-Meat Substitutes. Part 3
Curried Potatoes Slice a large onion and brown in two tablespoons of butter. Cut up boiled potatoes (about two cups) and put into the frying-pan with the onion, dredge with curry powder, add half a c...
-Meat Substitutes. Part 4
Fried Carrots Boil large carrots, peel and cut in halves, or even cut again; dip in batter made of half a cup of milk, half a cup of flour, one egg, a little salt. Brown in hot oil or butter. Beet...
-Meat Substitutes. Part 5
Tomato Cups When used raw for salads or cold dishes, remove the skin and take out the centres; but if cooked, the skin is needed to keep them in shape. Tomato Curry Put in a baking-dish six tomat...
-Preserving And Pickling
Always use a porcelain lined kettle, and a wooden spoon for stirring. Before commencing to work, have everything ready. Bottles, tumblers, jars and their covers, must be washed clean and sterilized in...
-Preserving And Pickling. Part 2
Jelly - General Rule Cover the fruit with cold water, boil till tender, then drain in a jelly bag overnight. Do not squeeze if you wish clear jelly. Boil the juice twenty minutes, add its equivalent ...
-Preserving And Pickling. Part 3
Crab-Apple Jelly (Make in September and October.) This is one of the easiest jellies to make, using the general rule. Green-Grape Jelly (Make in September and October.) Gather grapes just as the...
-Preserving And Pickling. Part 4
Preserved Pear Chips (Hard Pears) Cut eight pounds of pears in small thin slices across the seeded centres; slice four lemons with peel and two without peel; add five pounds of sugar and half a pound...
-Pickling
A granite or porcelain kettle and the best cider vinegar should always be used in pickling. If the vinegar is too acid, dilute it with clear water. Use a wooden spoon to stir. For catsup the fruits an...
-Pickling. Continued
Sweet Pickle A good general rule is seven pounds of fruit, three and a half pounds of sugar, one quart of vinegar, and spices to taste. Cucumber Sweet Pickle Pare, seed, and cut in long strips ri...
-Home-Made Candy
Cooked candy is the better; but uncooked candy, using confectioner's sugar, is much easier to make. A clear day is necessary to secure the best results. Boiling the syrup is the hardest part, and is t...
-Cooked Candy
English Barley Sugar Put one and a half pounds of lump sugar and one pint of water in a porcelain kettle, stand half an hour, boil and skim till it becomes hard when tried in water. Add the juice of ...
-Cooked Candy. Part 2
Maple Cream Walnuts Melt two cups of maple sugar in one cup of water; stir while cooking ten minutes; when a little will harden when dropped in cold water, add a level teaspoon of butter. Take from t...
-Cooked Candy. Part 3
Baked Peanut Candy (2) Melt one tablespoon of butter, add one cup of sugar; when dissolved, add one pint of ground peanuts and bake fifteen minutes in well-buttered tin. Honey Candy Two cups of g...
-Cooked Candy. Part 4
French Creams Bring slowly to a boil, and cook for five minutes, two cups of granulated sugar and one half cupful of milk. Beat till it creams, shape into balls with the hands, and place walnuts on t...
-Uncooked Candy
Turkish Figs Chop together very fine, one pound each of figs, dates, and walnuts. Then knead in as much confectioner's sugar as possible, anywhere from two to three cups. Roll out one fourth of an in...
-Chafing-Dish Candies
Chocolate Marshmallow Fudge Stir together two cups of sugar, three tablespoonfuls of cocoa or chocolate, and add one teaspoon of butter. When it boils, put in ten cents' worth of marshmallows, but do...
-Hints To The Cook
Care Of The Stove Before polishing the stove, wash it with vinegar. This removes all grease, leaving the surface smooth, and keeps the blacking from burning off so quickly, saving much time and labor...
-Hints To The Cook. Continued
Vegetables Old potatoes, or any vegetables (when not new) are improved by soaking in cold water for several hours after paring. Celery should be allowed to lie in cold water, to which a little salt ...
-To Soften Tough Meat
Brush over with oil (or butter) and vinegar, using one part of vinegar to two parts of oil or butter, and let stand for a few hours. This is often done in tropical countries. A little vinegar served i...
-Coffee
To make a cup of coffee more nourishing, stir into it an egg well beaten. First beat the egg in the cup, then add a little cream, and then sugar, and lastly pour the coffee in very gradually. When add...
-Meat And Vegetables To Be Served Together
Roast Beef Potatoes prepared in all the different ways, baked or browned sweet potatoes, asparagus, squash, spinach, Brussels sprouts, string beans, cauliflower, or lima beans. Filet Of Beef Pota...
-Table Of Weights And Measures
4 teaspoons equal 1 tablespoon. 2 teaspoons equal 1 dessert spoon. 2 dessert spoons equal 1 tablespoon. 8 tablespoons (liquid) equal 1 gill. 6 tablespoons (dry) equal 1 gill. 2 gills equal 1 cup. ...
-A Helping Hand In The Laundry
Home-Made Soap Save every bit of fat until, when melted, it fills a five-pound pail. Heat to a liquid in the oven. Place a large earthen bowl in the sink and put in it one can of potash, one quart an...
-A Helping Hand In The Laundry. Part 2
Starch To make starch, dissolve two table-spoonfuls of starch in one half cup of cold water; pour over this one quart of boiling water, stirring briskly till clear. Scrape into this, while hot, wax f...
-A Helping Hand In The Laundry. Part 3
Washing Flannels In washing flannels care must be taken not to shrink them. Wash on a clear day. All the water must be of the same temperature; never rub, or use yellow soap; dry as quickly as possib...
-Stains, And How To Remove Stains
When an article is stained, first learn the nature of the stain, then the remedy to apply. It is always safe to try kerosene first on any stained white goods. Cold or tepid water, or milk, never fixes...
-Stains, And How To Remove Stains. Part 2
Fruit Stains When first made rub salt on the stain, and afterwards pour boiling water over and through the stained part, allowing it to stand in the water for a time. In cold weather, fruit spots can...
-Stains, And How To Remove Stains. Part 3
Pitch, Wheel Grease, Or Tar Stains Soften with lard and soak in turpentine. Scrape off carefully all surface dirt that will come off, then sponge with the turpentine. Rub gently till dry and then pla...
-Toilet Ideas
Cold Cream (Simple And Inexpensive) Heat four ounces of almond oil in the double boiler; add one ounce each of spermaceti and white wax. When melted, beat till almost cool. To this mixture add four o...
-Remedies
Sunburn Shake well in a bottle one ounce of olive oil, one ounce of water or rosewater, one teaspoon of cooking-soda, and a tiny bit of soap. (The latter may be omitted.) This can be used when the sk...
-Remedies. Continued
Care Of The Feet Bathe the feet every morning in warm water, soaping well; rinse in cold water. If a little alum is put into the water it will help harden, and prevent aching. A handful of bran, once...
-Emergencies
Bee stings or stings of any insect. Apply to the spot as soon as possible ammonia and water, bruised or chewed catnip or plantain leaves, moistened cooking-soda or saleratus, or wet earth. Any of thes...
-Emergencies. Part 2
Croup Summon a physician at once; croup is dangerous to young children. Meanwhile apply hot flannels to the chest. Keep the room warm; if possible have a tea-kettle boiling rapidly; the steam will he...
-Emergencies. Part 3
Mustard Plaster Mix one tablespoonful of corn meal or flour with two tablespoonfuls of mustard, wet till moist, and spread on a piece of muslin; cover with another piece and heat before applying. ...
-Periods Of Infection Of Contagious Diseases
Measles Three weeks from the commencement of the disease, if all rash and cough have ceased. Mumps Three weeks from the commencement of the disease, if all swelling has gone down. Chicken Pox ...
-Needlework And Other Handwork
Nightingale Two yards of flannel or silk will make a pretty and comfortable wrap for an invalid, sitting up in bed. A straight slit is cut six inches deep in the middle of one side and the corners tu...
-Needlework And Other Handwork. Continued
Pique Hat For A Baby Make a circle eleven and one half inches in diameter with a pencil and cord, or with a dinner plate. Mark a circle in the centre of this small circle, and you have the rim of the...
-Sewing Helps
A good interlining for cuffs or tailored shirt-waists is soft old table-linen. The linen is already shrunk and holds the starch well. Sew a button on the neckband of a shirtwaist instead of making a ...
-Embroidery
In old times, our great-grandmothers in their childhood worked samplers, which were done in cross-stitch, this stitch being the most familiar type of canvas stitch, which is considered the earliest us...
-Embroidery. Continued
Herring-Bone Stitch This is a most familiar stitch; it has been used so exclusively for seams that its decorative qualities have been overlooked. It may be worked in fine lines or in tapering forms. ...
-Crochet
Irish Crochet Lace This lace may be made of silk, linen, or cotton, whether fine or coarse depends upon the use to which the lace is to be put. It may be used for dress trimmings, medallions, edgings...
-Crochet. Part 2
5 Doubles (Notice only 2 picots.) 4 doubles, 1 picot 4 doubles, 1 picot Fill loop of 13 with 4 doubles, 1 picot 4 doubles. (Notice 3 picots.) Fill last loop of 10 like the first. (This makes on...
-Crochet. Part 3
An Insertion (Wider than the others.) Use No. 40 Coats's cotton. Chain 28 and catch into 8th stitch from the needle, making a loop. First row - Chain 6 and catch back into third from needle, making ...
-Knitting
Explanation of stitches, and abbreviations found in most directions: -k. = Knit plain. Purl P, or, as it is often called, seam. Throw the thread over the needle (which will bring it in front of th...
-Knitted Sack
(For a small child.) This is made of blue, or any color preferred, and white saxony, and is sewed together under the arms and along the sleeves. Cast on 68 stitches with the white wool for the back a...
-Knit Rug
(Coarse steel needles and No. 8 White Cotton.) Ravel out tapestry carpet, the ravelings to be about two inches long. Cast on forty stitches and knit across plain. Take a piece of raveling, knit it i...
-Moss Stitch. Also called Rough-and-Ready
Moss Stitch(Also called Rough-and-Ready.) Knit 1, purl 1; in next row across purl 1, knit 1, always being careful to purl the knit stitch and knit the purl stitch. Design No 1 Often found in old p...
-Sweater
(Use No. 3 or 4 bone needles, and No. 12 steel.) One who knows how to knit may easily knit a sweater using measurements, and varying number of stitches according to size desired. Measure the length o...
-Smocking
When in childhood we saw in the picture books the illustrations of how Simple Simon met a Pieman, we little thought that the frocks on the men were the smock-frocks worn at one time quite generally ...









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previous page: Manual Of Household Work And Management | by Annie Butterworth
  
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next page: Practical Housekeeping | by Estelle Woods Wilcox