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Warne's Model Housekeeper | by Ross Murray



A manual of domestic economy in all its branches.

TitleWarne's Model Housekeeper
AuthorRoss Murray
PublisherFrederick Warne & Co.
Year1882
Copyright1882, Frederick Warne & Co.
AmazonLarousse Gastronomique

Compiled And Edited By Ross Murray.

With Original Illustrations Printed In Colours By Kronbeim, And Numerous Woodcuts.

Warne's Model Housekeeper
-Preface
This companion volume to Warne's Model Cookery Book has been in course of preparation for more than three years. During its progress the Editor has attentively watched for all new discoveries in Scien...
-The Modern Householder. Introduction
To a people who dwell so much in their homes as the English, any information which can tend to make those seats of domestic life happier, more comfortable, brighter, and more attractive, should be wel...
-The Hired House
The choice of a house is a matter of no small moment. It must be directed necessarily in the first place by the means of the inmate, or by the needs of his position or profession. It is usual to sa...
-Ventilation
The ventilation of dwelling-houses, although as important as that of churches and other buildings in which large numbers of people congregate, has, however, been almost entirely overlooked until latel...
-Hiring Houses
Houses may be hired for any period. By agreement for three years, or by leases of 7, 14, or 21 years, or by the week, month, quarter, or year, if the landlord chooses. The rent for the lease is genera...
-How To Purchase A House
Purchased houses are either freehold, leasehold, or copyhold. Of these, a freehold is greatly to be preferred. It becomes, by purchase, the property of the purchaser for his life, with power to will i...
-Building A House
Miss Edgeworth calls proverbs thewisdom of nations. If herassertion is correct, the said wisdom has decided strongly against building a house for one's own habitation.* Nevertheless, there are peopl...
-Lodgings
Furnished lodgings are generally hired by the week; unfurnished, by the year or quarter. Payments are made according to arrangements between the householder and lodger. One of the greatest objectio...
-Papering And Painting The House
Papering a house is a subject for great consideration before furnishing it. Very generally the landlord of a dwelling-house allows the incoming tenant to select his own papers at a fixed price. If the...
-Papering And Painting The House. Part 2
First Kind. Harmonies Of Analogous Colours 1. The harmony of scale, produced by the simultaneous view of different tones* of a second scale, more or less approximating. 2. The harmony of hues,&#...
-Papering And Painting The House. Part 3
People say the effect is only on the mind. It is no such thing. The effect is on the body, too. Little as we know about the way in which we are affected by form, by colour, and light, we do know thi...
-Furnishing
A house painted and papered with taste has next to be furnished with taste* Where the means are large and the taste good, this may be easily achieved; but it by no means follows that expensive furn...
-The Entrance-Hall
The hall may, in the country, rejoice in sylvan trophies of the chase - antlers - the fox's head and brush; - old carved oak cabinets may fill in recesses, and within them may repose a collector's tre...
-Floor-Cloth
The foundation of this cloth is either of flax, or else the foundation of an old Brussels carpet - part flax, part wool. A strong oil-paint is laid smoothly over it in four coats, and the pattern is s...
-The Dining-Room
Should look warm in winter, and cool in summer. The carpet should be a rich Turkey or Axminster - not quite covering the floor, but leaving a border of polished oak. The sideboard should be (in the co...
-The Drawing-Room
Might have a light-coloured paper and paint picked out with gold, and the cornice and ceiling the same, with soft shades of grey. The furniture may then be of any hue chosen. Amber is very elegant; pe...
-The Library
Should have a rich Turkey carpet, and the furniture should be of a handsome and stately character, of carved oak or rosewood. Above the bookshelves should be busts of distinguished authors, and in the...
-The Bedrooms
A lady's bedroom (where money can be commanded) may be a very charming retreat. Bedsteads of great elegance may be purchased, and should if possible stand back in an alcove. We have seen them of carve...
-Housekeeper's And Lady's-Maid's Rooms
The Housekeeper's Room should be neatly but plainly furnished, and should contain large closets, or cupboards, for her use; writing materials, a slate-book and pencil for the dinner carte, and as the ...
-Woods Used In Furnishing
The woods used in furnishing are - deal, mahogany, rosewood, walnut, birch, maple, beech, white and yellow pine, satin-wood, cedar; and oak. lime, and pear, which are used for carving. Of these woods,...
-Cheap Furnishing
We have now to consider how taste may be blended with economy. Of course, the same laws respecting harmony of colour belong to the rich and poor alike. Say you have hired an ordinary London house. ...
-Cheap Furnishing. Part 2
The toilette muslin being made to open in the same place as the doors - i.e., in the middle of the front - will throw back and allow the doors to open easily. The dresses can be laid at full length in...
-Cheap Furnishing. Part 3
The expense of making the lids into a door will not be great; a hinge on each box and a strong lock also will be necessary. Cover them with one of those hall papers, which are excellent imitations of ...
-Purchasing Secondhand Furniture
Furniture may be purchased very cheaply at sales, but in order not to run any risk of being tricked by brokers running up the prices, it is best to mark a catalogue with the exact sum you would give f...
-Purchasing Secondhand Furniture. Part 2
Large And Expensive Kitchen Floorcloth (canvas). 4 chairs. Large deal table. Side table. Marble slab for making pastry. Spit, smoke-jack, etc., if open range, but kitcheners and gas-...
-Purchasing Secondhand Furniture. Part 3
Glass - Cheap Furnishing 12 tumblers. 12 (port) wine glasses. 12 (sherry) wine glasses. 12 claret glasses. 2 quart decanters. Water jug and glasses. 4 salt cellars. Bottles and glasses ...
-Lamps
Gas is very generally used now in towns. It is the cheapest light there is, and the dirtiest. It defaces and tarnishes gold, blackens the ceilings, and unbinds books; nevertheless it is popular on acc...
-Gas
Gas consists of light carburetted hydrogen, defiant gas, hydrogen, carbonic oxide, nitrogen, vapour of volatile liquid, carbides of hydrogen, vapour of bisulphide of carbon. Great care should be ta...
-The China Closet
Two hundred years ago china was the Englishwoman's passion; the fancy for it was carried to an extent of folly satirized by most of the writers of the day. There is no inclination in women, says Ad...
-The China Closet. Part 2
Majolica is Italian pottery, sometimes known under the name of Raf-faele ware or Umbrian ware. It was manufactured, it is believed, in imitation of the Moorish pottery taken by the Pisans from Majorca...
-The China Closet. Part 3
Frederick compelled the Jews to become his customers by refusing to allow them to marry till they had purchased a service of Porcelain from the royal manufactory, from the trade of which he obtained 2...
-How To Wash China
Valuable china, such as Oriental, Dresden, or Sevres, should never be trusted to the housemaid to dust or wash; a lady of the family should do this task herself. For Dresden china, rich in groups o...
-The Linen Press Or Closet
The linen press or closet should be in a dry place. Each shelf should be covered with clean brown paper, and on it should lie a large muslin bag full of lavender, and a small one of camphor. A book sh...
-The Linen Press Or Closet. Part 2
Smallest Quantity 6 pairs of good cotton sheets. 6 pillow cases (untrimmed). 3 dozen bedroom towels, part rough, part soft, part servants' towels. 4 tablecloths. 1 dozen table napkins. ...
-Ornamentation
The taste of a lady is shown especially in the ornamentation of her apartments. The best ornaments (available for poor as well as rich) are flowers. They will enliven the dullest room, and bring na...
-Domestic Science
We believe that the mother of a family might derive much assistance in her domestic rule, and might be a gainer in many ways, did she possess a knowledge of certain natural laws, and the consequences ...
-Heat
Heat travels with light from the sun, but it can be produced by friction - by percussion - by chemical action - by electrical action - by vital power. Pouillet has carefully ascertained, says Profes...
-Heat. Part 2
This is the reason that want of food causes shrinking of the body; it is an actual wasting in the fire. The fat of the body, which is the most combustible part, goes first, and afterwards the muscles....
-Heat. Part 3
Recent researches, especially those of Professor Mantegazza, communicated during the year to the Institute of Lombardy, would seem to show that the ancients, after all, were by no means following mer...
-The Thermometer
The expansion of liquids by heat has been used in the formation of the Thermometer, or heat (thermo) measure (meter). Quicksilver, though a solid metal at the North Pole, is a liquid, and can be po...
-Communication Of Heat
Heat is communicated from one body to another by Conduction, Absorption, Reflection, Radiation, and Convection. Conduction means the communication of heat from one body to another by contact. Some ...
-Communication Of Heat. Part 2
Professor Pepper adds, Leslie's principle does apply to clothing, and it appears that if we imitate nature, and, like the Polar bear, wear white, we shall be warmer in winter and cooler in summer. ...
-Communication Of Heat. Part 3
When coals are small and dusty it is well to sprinkle them with water, this cakes them and the steam generated assists to heat them into combustion; a little water, in fact, makes a fire burn more fie...
-Light
Light is supposed to be communicated and produced by the vibratory motion of a subtle and delicate ether, but it is believed that further discoveries may be made on the subject hereafter. Starting...
-The Human Eye
From Professor Pepper's Cyclopedic Science Simplified? This elaborate and wonderful work of the Creator, built up of the usual constituents of animal substances, viz. - albumen, gelatine, fibri...
-The Human Eye. Continued
This may have been the person who had the secret as well as the learned monk, because Redi states that the latter only disclosed the secret upon learning that another person had it as well as himself....
-The Stereoscope
This most valuable and instructive instrument, and now not only a 'household word,' but a piece of domestic apparatus without which no drawing-room is thought complete, was invented by Professor Whea...
-Refraction Of Light
Some slight knowledge of the refraction of light may be of great importance to boys or lady-bathers. We shall subjoin a few remarks from Cyclopaedic Science, and a practical hint on the subject: - ...
-Reflection Of Light
The rays of light are reflected from substances which are light and brilliant, as glass, crystals, steel, etc. Other substances absorb light, and always appear dark and dull. We see ourselves in a ...
-Artificial Light
Artificial light has next to be considered; and here the science of chemistry has been of the greatest service to man. In all ages, when science was little known, men provided themselves with artifici...
-Artificial Light. Continued
Wax candles cannot be cast as tallow are. To make them, a number of cottons are hung on frames, and covered with metal tags at the ends to keep the wax from covering the cotton. Melted wax is then pou...
-Water
Water is another of the great agents of life. Without it the whole world must perish. On its uses we have no occasion to dilate. It is one individual thing. It never changes. It can be added to by car...
-Water. Part 2
River-water contains a less proportion of saline matters in solution: it is not, however, so good to drink as spring-water, because it frequently occurs that rivers receive the sewage of large towns, ...
-Water. Part 3
Moist air is very objectionable to the housewife for another cause - it rusts her bright stoves and fire-irons. The oxygen in the air combines with the surface of the metal and oxidizes - that is, rus...
-Water. Part 4
The Poor Man's Filter Made With A Flower-Pot Plug the hole at the bottom, but not too tightly, with a new piece of sponge, lay over it powdered charcoal two inches thick; cover this with a layer of...
-Water. Part 5
Ether can be boiled in a vessel immersed in water, because it boils at a lower temperature, 960. Water is best kept in uncovered cisterns, because the air prevents or annihilates putrefaction by su...
-Electricity
We have already spoken of rain, hail, and snow; it is time to discuss the great agent of storms - Electricity, which exists latent probably in nearly all terrestrial objects, and is seen in nature as ...
-The Barometer
Two Greek words - , a weight, and , a measure - are enlisted to give the title to this most valuable instrument, which accurately demonstrates the variability of the pressure of the air. Merc...
-The Barometer. Part 2
The barometer is highest of all during a protracted frost, and rises with a north-east wind, and when the air is very dry. The barometer falls very low in a thaw; it falls also when the wind comes fro...
-The Barometer. Part 3
In summer when our climate is nearer in heat to that of the tropics, the air rushes to us with less force and velocity. This tendency of the air to preserve an equilibrium is one of the wisest laws...
-Magnetism
The magnetic or black oxide of iron, sometimes called the lead-stone or loadstone, is estimated as one of the most valuable ores of iron, because it enjoys the property, when freely suspended, of poin...
-The House-Mother
The house taken and furnished, the duties of the housewife or - we prefer giving her the expressive name employed by our German cousins, - the House-mother - begin, and first, perhaps, in her list of ...
-Food
The use of food is to repair the waste daily and hourly going on in our bodies, and to enable us to execute the work for which the body was designed ; also, as we have shown in the first pages of Dome...
-Wheat Flour And Its Nutritional Value
Wheat-flour is sold by millers, and all of these grains are sold at corn, chandlers. 21 ounces of wheat are required to yield lib. of flour. More than 100 varieties of wheat are cultivated in Great...
-Oats And Their Nutritional Value
Oats grow in England, but are much finer and better when grown in Scotland. In the husk, they are used chiefly as food for horses. The potato-oat has been long in cultivation. It yields the very best ...
-Barley And Its Nutritional Value
Barley is used in its natural state for feeding poultry, and constitutes the material for making malt. When threshed, the grain is called Scotch barley; further prepared, pearl-barley ; carefully grou...
-Maize Or Indian-Corn And Its Nutritional Value
Indian-corn meal is made from Maize, or Indian Corn, and is sold as polenta, and when coarsely bruised as hominy. Polenta makes very nice and nutritious bread, at a much lower price than Wheat-flour. ...
-Rye And Its Nutritional Value
Used for bread in Sweden and Russia. Rye makes a light spongy bread like wheat, and it is very nearly as nutritive as wheaten bread. Rye bread possesses one valuable quality, it retains its moistur...
-Buckwheat And Its Nutritional Value
Valuable for its late sowing, rapid growth, and cheap cultivation. Buckwheat flour is nearly as nutritious as wheaten flour, and makes excellent cakes. They are eaten in the backwoods of America ho...
-Wheaten Bread
If flour be mixed with sufficient water, the particles will cohere and form a smooth elastic substance called dough. When a little yeast is added to the flour before, or as it is being mixed with the ...
-The Yeast Plant
The yeast with which we raise our bread is a minute plant belonging to the division of the Conferva. It grows in certain substances - in the juice of ripe grapes, in the syrup of sugar-cane, in beer, ...
-How To Make Yeast For Home Consumption
No. 1 Time to boil, half an hour; to make, four days. Two ounces of the best hops; four quarts of water; one pound of best flour ; three pounds of good potatoes. Monday Boil two ounces of ...
-The Oven
The best oven for baking bread is the brick oven; but bread can be made at home and baked in the iron oven by the side of the fire, if good care be taken in the operation. There is an Italian expedien...
-Mixing The Dough
Put seven pounds of flour into a deep pan ; heap it round the sides, and leave a hollow in the centre ; pour into it a quart of milk-warm water, a large spoonful of salt, and half a gill of yeast; hav...
-Potato Bread
This is one of the best varieties of mixed or cheap bread when it is made with care, as its flavour is excellent, and it remains moist longer than any other except rice-bread ; but the potatoes used f...
-Sago Bread
Sago is procured from the sago palm. The meal is extracted from the pith by rubbing it to powder, and then washing it with water in a sieve. It makes alone a kind of bread or hard cake, and is the ...
-Baking Powders
These are best bought ; but if our readers are unable to procure any, they can be made thus : - One pound of ground rice, half a pound Oaten bread requires to make it warm water, a good deal of yeast,...
-Bread Recipes
French Bread Two quarts of flour, scald one pint of it; butter, half the size of an egg ; mix with cold water, two-thirds cup of yeast. When mixed, knead fifteen minutes, using as little additional...
-Bran And Its Nutritional Value
From this table it will be apparent that a portion of bran should be left in the flour. Constituent parts in 1 lb.: Oz. Grs. Water... ...
-Hominy
Hominy is Indian-corn shelled from the cob, and divested of its skin. It is then dried for use. There are three sizes of hominy ; the middle size is the best. Wash a teacup of hominy in plenty o...
-Milk, Cheese, And Butter
The substance casein (the curd which forms the cheese) resembles the gluten of vegetables, the fibrin of meat, and the albumen of the egg in nutritive qualities ; it possesses the same value, weight f...
-Milk, Cheese, And Butter. Part 2
How To Make Curds And Whey Into a tumbler of new milk put half a tea-spoonful of dissolved citric acid (or squeeze a lemon in). The milk will curdle directly, and the whey will be clear and acid. ...
-Butter
Butter is either fresh, potted, or salt. The potted butters are the Dorset, Welsh, and Ostend, and are slightly salted. The salt butter is coarse looking, but will keep a long time. The mode of making...
-Beef And Its Nutritional Value
Beef is the flesh of the ox, and is considered the staple animal food of England. Beef contains fibrin, which resembles the gluten of plants in composition and properties. The amount of water in beef ...
-Beef And Its Nutritional Value. Continued
Joints For Roasting. Ribs. Sirloin Chump of rump. Mouse buttock. Topside. Fillet of sirloin. Tongue, fresh. Heart. Joints for salting. Round. Aitch-bone. Silver-side. Brisket. Tongue. Joints ...
-Veal And Its Nutritional Value
Veal even when it is the flesh of a fatted calf is the most deficient of all meats in fat. It should be small, of a pinky white, and the kidney should be well covered with fat. The calf should not be ...
-Mutton And Its Nutritional Value
A sheep ought to be kept four years before killing; and home-fed mutton often attains this age, but butcher's mutton is rarely as old or as good as this. The darker the mutton is the better, it is a s...
-Lamb And Its Nutritional Value
Lamb should be small. House lamb can be had at Christmas. Grass lamb is in season from April to September. The flesh should be palecoloured red and fat. The leg of house lamb is sometimes boiled at Ch...
-Venison
Venison should be fat. If the cleft of the haunch is smooth and close the deer was young. A deer is cut up in four portions, thus: 1. Haunch. 2. Neck. 3. Shoulder. 4. Breast. R...
-Pork And Its Nutritional Value
Pork should never be bought of cheap butchers or strangers, as the pig is liable to horrible diseases - smallpox, trichinae, or little worms, measles, scarlet fever, etc. Pork is best purchased from a...
-How To Choose Meat
Dr. Letheby gives the following admirable directions for choosing meat of all kinds. Good meat has the following characteristics: - I. It is neither of a pale pink colour, nor of a deep purple...
-Lard
Lard is the fat of the pig melted down. The best is made from the kidney fat melted and poured into bladders. In foreign lard kidney and surface fat are mixed and melted down. When pure, lard has scar...
-How To Keep Beef
If you wish to keep beef two or three days in hot weather, do not salt it, but dry it well in a clean cloth, rub ground pepper plentifully over every part of it first, then flour it well and hang it i...
-How To Preserve Large Game Of All Kinds
Well clean the animal inside; drain the blood, and wipe it out with a damp cloth. Put it in a packing case, and cover the whole body with a thick layer of oats well pressed down. Fasten it down so as ...
-Meat Recipes
Cutlets A La Milanaise - An Entree Cut a pound and a half of veal into small cutlets, trim them neatly and put them into a stew-pan with two shallots, a stem of garlic, and a quarter of a pound of ...
-Poultry As Food And Its Nutritional Value
Fowl Fowls contain less fat than butcher's meat, except the capon, the ortolan, and the livers of Strasbourg geese. Poultry and the white meat of rabbits, says Dr. Letheby, are not of themsel...
-How To Choose Poultry
The cock is young when it has a smooth leg and short spur; when fresh the vent is closed and dark. Hens when young have smooth legs, and the vent is closed and firm. Black legged fowls are used for ro...
-Game
Grouse This group of birds contains the grouse proper and partridge. Grouse are in season in August, and are expensive birds. They are found chiefly in the North of England and Scotland, amongst...
-Game Recipes
Cuisses De Lapins A La Maintenon Bone two rabbit legs, and stew them with a tablespoonful of chopped mushrooms, same of parsley, and a little grated bacon. Let them cool when done. Cut and oil some...
-Fish And Its Nutritional Value
Fish is an important article of food. It is more rich in fibrin or flesh-forming matter than butcher's meat or birds, but it contains less fat and gelatine. Fish frequently contains large quantities o...
-Salmon And Its Nutritional Value
The salmon is found in great multitudes in the Northern seas, from whence it ascends rivers in large shoals every spring. It swims with great rapidity, and can leap a height of twelve or fifteen feet....
-Soles, Turbot, Etc And Their Nutritional Value
The Turbot, Brill, Sole, Halibut, Plaice, Flounder, Dab and Hake, are all of the same family, and are excellent for food. Their form is very deep, but, at the same time, very thin, and they are not c...
-Mackerel And Its Nutritional Value
The mackerel is an excellent fish; it has a blue back marked with undulating black stripes and five false fins. It is a migratory fish, and at certain periods of the year abounds on the coasts of Euro...
-Herrings And Their Nutritional Value
The common herring inhabits the northern seas; shoals of this fish arrive every year on the coasts of Europe and America, but they do not go farther south than 400 of north latitude. In the months of ...
-Choice Of Fish
The Anchovy is found on the coast of the Mediterranean and the western shores of France and Spain. It approaches the coast to spawn, and is then taken. Anchovies are attracted to the net by furnace...
-The Pike And Its Nutritional Value
The Pike is the most voracious of fresh-water fish. It devours frogs, young ducks, and all the fish which comes in its way. Its presence in a pond very soon depopulates it. Pike four or five feet long...
-Eels And Their Nutritional Value
Eels inhabit fresh water. By day they lie concealed in the mud or in holes which they excavate near the shore. When the water of the pond grows low or stagnates, the eels leave the bottom and conce...
-The Lobster, Crab, And Oyster And Their Nutritional Value
On examining a lobster with a little attention, says Professor Jones,* it will be seen that its head is furnished with four antennae. ......Its eyes are compound like those of an insect, and ar...
-The Lobster, Crab, And Oyster And Their Nutritional Value. Part 2
Oysters Au Parmesan Instead of grated bread, as in the foregoing receipt, use grated Parmesan, or English cheese. Oyster Etiquette Open two dozen oysters, and put them into a basin; chop a sm...
-The Lobster, Crab, And Oyster And Their Nutritional Value. Part 3
Shrimps And Prawns There are two kinds of shrimp - the brown and the red. The brown keeps near the shore, and is the most highly flavoured. The red shrimp is smaller, and of a more delicate flav...
-Vegetables
Asparagus An excellent vegetable, very nourishing and digestible. It is a native British plant, and grows wild in many parts of England and Scotland, though, of course, the wild plant is wonderfull...
-Vegetables. Continued
Cresses Both water and land cress are very wholesome, because anti-scorbutic. They are not nourishing, but they cool and freshen the blood. Land cress possesses the same pungent volatile oil peculi...
-Cauliflower
In season: June to September. The cauliflower, the name of which is supposed to be derived from caulis (a stalk), and fiorens (flowering), is a native of Cyprus, introduced in 1694. It requires exc...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value
The potato contains little flesh-forming matter; it is valuable or account of its starch and mineral substances. The ripe potato is covered with a thin skin of cork through which water can scarcely...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value. Continued
Some writers assert that potatoes were discovered by Sir Francis Drake in the South Seas, and others that Sir John Hawkins introduced them into England. It is evidently the sweet potato, or Battata da...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value. Part 2
The Cultivation Of The Potato The mode of propagating this root is very simple, the common method being to set the potato itself. This applies more particularly to the early kidney varieties, the l...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value. Part 3
Kidney Potatoes Admiral Lyons. Albert Prince. Albion, early. American climax. Ditto cluster. Ditto white blossom. Ashleaf, early. Ditto, red. Ditto, royal. Ashtop, fluke. Beef. Belgi...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value. Part 4
How To Boil Potatoes Be careful in the choice of the potatoes that they may be as nearly of the same size as possible, so that they may all be equally cooked. Wash them, but do not pare or cut them...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value. Part 5
Potatoes Mashed With Cabbage Or Spinach Moisten cold mashed potatoes with a little white sauce; take cold cabbage or spinach and chop either one very finely; moisten them with brown gravy. Fill a t...
-The Potato And Its Nutritional Value. Part 6
Potato Puffs Take cold roast meat, either beef or mutton, or veal or ham, clear it from the gristle, cut it small, and season with either zest, or pepper and salt, and cut pickles. Mash some boiled...
-Disease Of The Potato
The curl is a well-known disease amongst cultivators of potatoes, and is supposed to arise, in many cases, from using over-ripe seed stock, or seed that has been improperly kept during the winter and ...
-Cabbage And Its Nutritional Value
In season: Summer - June to August. Winter - October and November. Red - July to September. Our cabbage-plants of all kinds - broccoli, cauliflowers, cabbages, Scotch and German greens, Brussels...
-Lentils And Their Nutritional Value
Lentils are but little used in England as vegetables for the table. The French use them for soup, and as a broth with crusts of bread. A pint and three quarters of lentils will make a tureenful of ...
-Peas And Their Nutritional Value
The Pea is a native of the south of Europe, and was introduced, it is believed, in the reign of Henry VIII. Green peas are generally eaten when not more than a quarter ripe. They should always be u...
-Beans
In season: Broad-beans - June to August. French - June to August. Scarlet-runners - July to September. The Bean is said to be a native of Egypt, and is supposed to have been brought to England by t...
-The Turnip And Its Nutritional Value
Fibre less indigestible than carrot-fibre. The Turnip - a root - is equal in nutritive qualities to Indian-corn meal, being only different in fat; therefore fat meat should be eaten with turnips. ...
-The Carrot And Its Nutritional Value
The large and juicy Altringham carrot is the woody root of the wild carrot, Daucus carota, highly cultivated. It is very nutritious. The carrot is a native of England. Carrots are used with boiled ...
-The Parsnip And Its Nutritional Value
In season: November to April. More nutritive than turnip or carrot. The Parsnip requires the same culture as the turnip. It is very seldom sent to table, except with salt fish on fast days; but ...
-The Red Beet And Its Nutritional Value
(In season: all the year through) Beetroot is ready for the table in September or October. In taking them up and in boiling them great care must be taken not to wound the outer skin, for if it is s...
-Shallot, Garlic, And The Onion
Onion in season: Young - May and June; stored - August to October. A native of the south of Europe, introduced before the time of Henry VIII. The Shallot is a native of Palestine; it has been culti...
-The Lettuce And Its Nutritional Value
In season: April to October; Greek Lettuce - all the year. The Lettuce is said to have been introduced into England in 1562, but from what country is unknown. Various kinds from Maryland are now po...
-Herbs
Pot Herbs Parsley is a hardy biennial, a native of Sardinia, introduced in 1548. It may be gathered for drying in May, June, and July. Tarragon is a strong-smelling perennial from Siberia; intro...
-Cucumber And Its Nutritional Value
In season: Forced - March to June; open air - July to September. Neither heat-giving nor flesh-forming. A cool and pleasant vegetable, delightful in hot climates from the quantity of water it conta...
-Tomato, Or Love Apple
A tender annual, a native of South America, introduced before 1596. This vegetable is used chiefly for flavouring sauces; for that purpose it is invaluable. It makes also an excellent supper dish scal...
-Chicory, Or The Wild Endive
The Chicory is one of our native weeds; it grows in the calcareous or sandy soils of England, has a large pale blue flower and a white parsniplike tap root, which grows of good size when the plant is ...
-Wild Plants And Berries
Hips Made Into Jam The hip is the large red berry, or seed, of the hedge or dog-rose. Gather hips when ripe. Boil them in water till they will pulp through a very fine sieve. Take an equal weight o...
-Wild Plants And Berries. Continued
Hop-Tops The young shoots of hop are excellent served as asparagus. Break off the young shoots, tie them in bundles, and boil them in a little pot liquor for twenty minutes. They are served like as...
-The Common Mushroom. Agaricus Campestris (True Meadow Mushroom)
The common meadow mushroom varies considerably, but common to all are a fleshy pileus, which is sometimes smooth, sometimes scaly, in colour white, or of different shades of tawny, fuliginous, or bro...
-The Truffle (Tuber Cibarium)
The Truffle (Tuber cibarium) grows under ground, a few inches beneath the surface. Truffles are not common in England, though occasionally found. They are imported chiefly from Perigord, and they are ...
-How To Preserve Vegetables For Winter Use
Green stringed beans must be picked when young; put a layer three inches deep in a small wooden keg, or half-barrel, sprinkle in salt an inch deep, then put another layer of beans, then salt, and bean...
-Seaweeds
Marine Algae The seaweeds on our coasts are comparatively nutritious food. In a moderately dry condition they are said to contain from 18 to 26 per cent, of water, 9 1/2 to 15 per cent, of nitrogen...
-Laminaria Digitata or Sea-Girdles, Tangle, Sea-staff, Sea-wand, Cows'-tails, and Red-ware
Called Sea-girdles, in England; Tangle, in Scotland; Sea-staff, Sea-wand, Cows'-tails, and Red-ware in the Orkneys. These great thick stems are cut up by the fisher-boys as handles for knives or hooks...
-Alaria Eseulenta
(Name from ala, a wing, in allusion to the winged leaflets at the base of the frond). This beautiful plant is abundant on the northern coasts of England and Scotland, and extends throughout the w...
-Fresh Fruits
All fresh fruits contain a mixture of vegetable acids, with more or less sugar and mucilage. They are mostly cooling, refreshing, and wholesome, but to this stone fruits are in many cases an exception...
-Fresh Fruits. Continued
The Plum In season: August and September. An indigestible stone fruit, which, however, makes excellent jam, and good tarts; cooked, it is wholesome. Strawberries In season: June and July. ...
-Apples
In season: non-keeping, July to September; keeping, October to May. The apple is the most useful of fruits. It supplies the cider counties with their ordinary beverage, and, cooked, furnishes us wi...
-Ripe Pears
In season: non-keepers, Sept. and Oct.; keepers, Oct. to Feb. The pear is a very delicious fruit, and by extreme cultivation and care is produced of great size and delicious flavour. There are an i...
-Barberries
In season: July and August. The Barberry or berberry is of three kinds - the common red, the stoneless, and the sweet. The barberry makes an excellent preserve, and is a pretty breakfast or dessert...
-Gooseberries
In season: green, June and July; ripe, August and September. The Gooseberry is a common and very useful fruit. It will keep well, bottled green, or it makes a delicious preserve; it can be used for...
-The Peach And The Nectarine
In season: August, September, and October. The Peach is supposed to be a native of Persia, and was introduced into England about the middle of the sixteenth century. The peach and the nectarine are...
-The Apricot
In season: green, May; ripe, July and August. The Apricot is a native of America, introduced in 1562. Its culture is the same as that of the peach. The fruit is suffered to form, and is then thinne...
-The Cherry
In season: eating cherries, June and July; moreila, September. The Cherry is also indigestible when not cooked. It is said to have been brought to England by the Romans, Lucullus having imported it...
-The Fig
In season: September and October. The Fig will grow and bear well in any soil it likes. It thrives and bears well in London and the neighbourhood. The fruit is delicious and wholesome. The preserve...
-Mulberries
In season: September and October. There are three distinct species of Mulberry - the white, the black, and the red. The white mulberry is the tree on which the silkworm lives. It is scarcely ever g...
-Nuts
In season: hazel nut and filbert, September and October. Nuts are an indigestible food, full of oil, and valuable rather as a source of pleasure by affording us the delightful amusement of Nutting ...
-The Chestnut
Imported: September and October to December. There are two kinds of chestnuts - the sweet or Spanish chestnut, and the horse-chestnut. The sweet chestnut (Castanea vesca) of Asia; it has also been ...
-The Walnut
In season: fresh, September and October; for pickling, July. The Romans called this fruit the Nut of Jove; the Greeks dedicated the tree to Diana, and held festivals under its shade. With us, it ...
-Grapes
In season: forced, May to September; open air, September to November; foreign, November to May. The Grape is the most wholesome of fruits, and a grape diet has of late years been recommended as a c...
-The Store-Room
A large airy, cool and dry store-room is a great boon - a small airy closet will, however, suffice if a large one is not to be had. Shelves, hooks and nails in the walls, or on the edges of the shelve...
-How To Make Vinegar
Vinegar (acetic acid) is the acid of malt. It is obtained also from various other sources - from wine, cider, sugar, and wood. Good table vinegar can also be made from the vinegar-plant. This plant...
-How To Make Vinegar. Continued
How To Make The Vinegar Plant Grow, And Vinegar From It Get a quarter of a pound of sugar, and the same of treacle; add to them three pints of water; boil all together and put in a pan; cover it ov...
-Salt
Component parts, when pure: 39.4 parts of sodium and 60.6 chlorine. Salt is absolutely required for the support of health. Upwards of half the saline matter of the blood consists of common salt; th...
-Mustard
Is a native of Europe, and was introduced into England before 1548. Our readers may remember how Grumio teased the Shrew by proposing the mustard without the beef; and how Bottom spoke to Mustard-...
-Pepper
Constituent parts: Acrid resin - Essential oil - Piperine. Pepper, unlike the other spices, possesses a nitrogenized principle, called Piperine. Its effect on the human body is the same as that of ...
-Curry Powder
The best and purest is to be bought only at Apothecaries' Hall. Curry powder is adulterated with red lead. Recipes brought from India for excellent curry powder are given in Warne's Model Cooke...
-Olive Oil
The flask of oil must be kept in the driest and above all darkest place in the storeroom, as light injures it very much. Olive oil is demulcent and laxative. It is an antidote to some poisons, and app...
-Nutmegs And Mace
Are the fruit of the nutmeg tree, of which there are three species - Myristica fragrans, Myristica fatua, Myristica malabarica. This tree resembles the pear tree. Its fruit is like a large pear in sha...
-Spices
Cloves Constituents: Essential oil - Resin - Tannin - Woody fibre. Cloves are the fruit, or rather the cup of the unopened flowers of the clove tree, Caryophyllus aromaticus, a native of the Mol...
-Ginger
Constituents: Gum - Starch - Woody fibre - Volatile oil - Acrid resin. Ginger is the root of a perennial plant called Zingiber Officinale, growing in Asia, Africa, and the Tropics of America. The r...
-Rice
Rice is not as nourishing as other cereals, though, of course, its use as food by the populations of Hindostan shows that it will sustain life; but as we have shown, it takes four pounds thirteen ounc...
-Arrowroot
Arrowroot is a starch obtained from the roots of many plants. There is the Marania Arimdiuacea, Tacca Oceana, Manihot, and Curcuma roots. Of these, the Maranta arrowroot is considered the best, and...
-Maizena
Maizena is a preparation of corn-flour. Maizena Pudding One quart of milk, five tablespoonfuls of maizena, two eggs, essence of lemon or vanilla, sugar to taste; some candied citron and orange-p...
-Maccaroni And Vermicelli
Are preparations of wheat flour. The flour is mixed with water and then forced through perforated plates of a larger or smaller size. The maccaroni is forced through large holes - the vermicelli throu...
-Cooking Ingredients
Sago Sago is the pith of an Indian palm called Sagus iavis. This pith is steeped in water, becomes a paste, and is rubbed, when half dried, through a perforated plate, which causes it to be easily ...
-Soap
This useful article should be bought in quantities; say, half cwt. or cwt. at a time, if the family be large; if small, it should be bought by the four bars at once. A bar contains about three pounds ...
-Starch
Starch is an important constituent part of food, as it assists, with sugar and gum, in forming the fat of the body, and in carrying on the respiratory process; but, separately; it is used for stiffeni...
-Candles
The manufacture and chemistry of candles have already been so fully described in Domestic Science, that we have little more to add respecting them, except that tallow candles are the better for keep...
-Oil
Colza-oil is that which is chiefly in use in families for the moderator-lamp. It is the oil of the Brassica Arvensis, which is grown in France and Belgium. It is pressed from the seed, and purified an...
-Household Recipes
How To Make Emery Cloth Buy some emery powder. By washing in water (as before explained), get the different degrees of coarseness, cover a piece of thin cotton cloth with a light layer of glue, spr...
-Dried Fruits
Prunes are dried plums. French plums are the best dried plums. Prunes are chiefly used for stewing. French plums are fit for dessert. Normandy Biffens are apples dried in stove heat till they look ...
-Raisins
Raisins are simply dried grapes. Grapes are dried for raisins in the sun or by stove heat. Those dried in the sun - called raisins of the sun - are thought much the best. The common raisins dried i...
-The Date
The date has been justly called the Bread of the Desert, for multitudes of the Arab tribes scattered over the sandy regions of Egypt and Arabia live chiefly on this fruit. It grows amid parched sand...
-Oranges
In season: November to June. Enormous numbers of oranges are imported yearly into England, and are of the greatest value in the household, being most wholesome and greatly needed by people who feed...
-Lemons
In season: all the year. Lemons (from which the useful citric acid is obtained) are imported and are to be had all the year, but come freshly into England in June. They are an absolutely requisi...
-Eggs
The Hen's Egg The average weight of a hen's egg in the shell is two ounces. The egg consists of the shell, the white, and the yolk. The shell is composed of carbonate of lime, - that is, chalk. ...
-Eggs. Part 2
Grandmother's Strips Make a syrup of sugar, marsala, and water in a rather deep stewpan. Beat together eight fresh eggs with a dessert spoonful, of flour, or arrowroot. Get a colander, the holes of...
-Tea
Our truly national beverage is made from the leaf of the tea-plant (Thea sinensis), a shrub which bears a great resemblance to the Camellia Japonica. The tea-plant is a native of China, and grows wild...
-Coffee
The Coffee tree is a native of southern Abyssinia, where it grows in the countries of Enarea and Caffa like a weed. Coffee was brought from Abyssinia to Arabia in the beginning of the fifteenth centur...
-Cocoa And Chocolate
The Mexican Cocoa is the seed of the Theobroma cacao, a small tree with bright dark green leaves, which grows in the West Indies and the central regions of America. It grows wild in Mexico, and there ...
-Sugar
The Sugars in modern use are, cane sugar, maple, beet, maize, and palm sugar. The ancients had only honey, grape sugar, manna, and fruit sugars. Sugar is also maufactured from potatoes, seaweeds, m...
-Honey
Honey is the sweet juice of flowers prepared for our use by the honeybee. The working bees extract it from the nectaries of the flowers, deposit it in their crop or honey-bag, which is an expansion of...
-Seeds And Dried Vegetables For Winter Use
Keep celery and parsley seed in the store-room for flavouring soup and making parsley sauce. The seed boiled giving the flavour. Liebig's extract of meat can be flavoured by boiling vegetables, her...
-Pickling And Preserving
Pickling is preserving fruit or vegetables in vinegar. Orleans, or white-wine vinegar, though the dearest to purchase, will be found the cheapest in the end, as it keeps best: indeed the success of pi...
-List Of Vegetables For Pickling At Certain Periods
In July And August Capsicums, cauliflowers, cucumbers, chilis, gherkins, onions, nasturtiums, walnuts, radish pods, French beans, red cabbage, samphire, shalots, garlic. October And September ...
-Preserving
The requisites for making jams and jellies are enamelled or iron pre serving-pans (no other should be used), a wooden spoon, a hair-sieve, and a jelly-bag; copper and brass pans are dangerous on accou...
-Preserving. Continued
Herb Mixture Two ounces of knotted marjoram, two ounces of winter savory, one ounce of basil, one ounce of tarragon. Rub these dried herbs together and put them into a spare clean dry pickle bot...
-Fritters
Orange Fritters Take the peel and white skin from three large oranges; then cut them across into slices; pick out the seeds; dip each slice of orange into a thick batter. Fry them nicely, and serve...
-A Few Useful Recipes
Night Lights Nightlights are merely short pieces of stearic acid, or stearine, with a fine wick enclosed in a thin roll of paper or wood shaving. They are burnt in a little glass or china stand hol...
-Puddings
Thatched Pudding Time, twenty minutes. Two ounces of butter; two dessertspoonfuls of flour; a little cold milk; half a pint of boiling milk; two lemons; four eggs; angelica; lemon peel - six or ...
-Cooling Summer And Hot Winter Drinks
Ice Ice, once a luxury enjoyed only by the rich, has become a necessity of daily life. Rough ice, at 1d. or 2d. per lb. is used in summer for keeping fish good, and cooling butter in nearly all wel...
-Cooling Summer And Hot Winter Drinks. Part 2
Rhubarb Tea Time, quarter of an hour. Two pounds of rhubarb-sticks, one lemon, sugar to taste - one quart of water. Slice the rhubarb, boil it for a quarter of an hour in a quart of water; st...
-Cooling Summer And Hot Winter Drinks. Part 3
Cherry Water Pound a dozen large sour cherries in a mortar, so as to break the kernels, then put them into a tumbler, fill it two-thirds with water, and add sugar to taste. This is a cooling drink....
-Cooling Summer And Hot Winter Drinks. Part 4
Capillaire Drink Into a tumbler of fresh cold water pour a tablespoonful of capillaire, and the same of good vinegar. Tamarinds, currants, fresh or in jelly, or scalded currants or cranberries, ...
-Cooling Summer And Hot Winter Drinks. Part 5
Imperial Water Put a quarter of an ounce of cream of tartar and the peel of a lemon, cut very thin, into a jug, pour upon them a quart of boiling water, sweeten it with loaf sugar, stir it with a s...
-Barley Beverages
Barley Milk Half pound of pearl-barley, three pints of milk, one quart of cream, cinnamon and sugar to taste, one pint of sherry. Boil the pearl-barley in the milk till it is done; add the cream...
-Ciders and Cups
A Cooling Cider Drink One teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, as much again powdered loaf sugar, a tablespoonful of brandy, one tumbler of cider. Mix altogether in a tumbler, and fill up with cide...
-Ciders and Cups. Continued
Champagne Cup One bottle of champagne, three wineglasses of sherry, one glass of curagoa, four slices of lemon, two slices of cucumber (or peel), one of pineapple, one bottle of soda-water, half a ...
-Lemonades
How To Keep Lemon Juice To every pint of juice put a pound of double refined sugar; stir it until the sugar is quite dissolved; then bottle it. Put a teaspoonful of salad oil on the top and cork it...
-Lemonades. Continued
Lemon Whey Boil as much milk as you require; squeeze a lemon, add as much of the juice to the milk as will make it quite clear. Mix with hot water and sweeten to taste. Lemon Powder Half an o...
-Syrups
How To Make Simple Sugar Syrup Proportions: one pound of sugar to half a pint of water. Put half a pint of water to each pound of sugar; when it is all dissolved set it over a gentle fire, let i...
-Strawberry Vinegar
Take the stalks from the fruit, which should be a highly-flavoured sort, quite ripe, and gathered in dry weather; weigh, and put them into large wide-necked bottles, and to each pound pour about a pin...
-Sherbets
Strawberry Sherbet Fourteen ounces of picked strawberries; one quart of water; one lemon; one teaspoonful of orange-flower water; eighteen ounces of sugar. Crush the strawberries in a mortar; th...
-Orgeat
Haifa pound of shelled almonds; half a gallon of water; twenty-two drops of lemon essence; two pounds of sugar; ice. Put the almonds into hot water and rub off their skins. Pound them in a mortar to a...
-Beers
Raspberry Beer Half an ounce of cream of tartar; one pound of loaf sugar; one gallon of boiling water; mix and stir well; when nearly cold add a tablespoonful of yeast; let it ferment in a pan, and...
-Syllabub
One bottle of white wine, quarter of a pound of sugar, two quarts of milk. Pour the wine into a bowl, add the sugar and a little nutmeg; milk on it from the cow two quarts of milk. Well froth the m...
-Punch
One of sour, two of sweet, four of strong, eight of weak, is the formula for making excellent punch. An Excellent Method Of Making Punch Take two large lemons, with rough skins, and some lumps o...
-Noyau
Take a gallon of pale-coloured rum and half a gallon of whisky7 (or gin), a pound and a half of sweet almonds, and half a pound of bitter, blanch them, and put them into the spirit. Take nine pounds o...
-Shrub
One pint of Seville orange juice, two pounds of white sugar, three pints of rum or brandy; when the sugar is dissolved, strain through a jelly-bag and bottle it. Currant Shrub One pint of red cu...
-Maraschino
Maraschino is a liqueur distilled from cherries, but it can be imitated either with almonds or oranges. To a quart of cream of the valley add two ounces of blanched bitter almonds bruised to a past...
-Brandy
Cherry Brandy Cherries; four tablespoonfuls of white powdered sugar, and some brandy. Fill your bottles with cherries, the quantity of sugar not to exceed four tablespoonfuls to each bottle, thr...
-Home-Made Elder Wine
To five gallons of ripe elderberries put ten gallons of water, boil them with the water for a quarter of an hour, then strain them through a hair-sieve, not pressing the berries; measure the liquor in...
-Home-Made Wines
Malt Wine With every three pints of water boil three pounds of sugar as long as any scum rises, which must be taken off, then pour it into a vessel, and when sufficiently cool, add to each three qu...
-Home-Made Wines. Continued
Gooseberry Wine Take four pounds of gooseberries at the time for bottling; pick and bruise them in a mortar; put over them one gallon of water, and let it stand three days, stirring it three or fou...
-Foreign Wines And The Management Of The Cellar
Wines are prepared by the dried fermentation of the sugar which exists in the juices of fruits. The wines of Europe are mostly made from the juice of the grape, which before fermentation is called mu...
-Foreign Wines And The Management Of The Cellar. Part 2
Masdeu Is an excellent Roussillon wine; it is strong in body, deep in colour, and of rich soft taste. Sherry-is either brown or pale. Amontillado, a dry delicate sherry, is from Andalusia. It...
-Foreign Wines And The Management Of The Cellar. Part 3
Claret Becoming now a universal beverage, is a French wine of the Bordelais. The name claret comes (Mr. Redding tells us) from Clairet; the wine is a mixture of several sorts of wine, Beni-Castro ...
-Foreign Wines And The Management Of The Cellar. Part 4
Hocks From the town of Hochheim on the Marne the name Hock is derived; and is too generally applied to all German wines by us. The Hochheimer made near this town is very excellent, but the best win...
-Champagne
Champagne, says Mr. Redding, in his interesting book, reached its present perfection and estimation in 1610, at the coronation of Louis XIII. The oldest anecdote which the French possess relative t...
-The Wine Cellar
The wine cellar should if possible face north, and be divided in two portions, as some wines, such as Madeira, Sherry, Malaga, and Cyprus, keep better at a higher temperature than the light wines requ...
-The Wine Cellar. Decanting
Port wine should be decanted very carefully into a warm decanter, keeping the chalked side of the bottle uppermost, so as not to disturb the crust or sediment. Sherry should be decanted two hours befo...
-Distilled Spirits
Distillation was invented by the Arabs, and was introduced into Europe by them A.D. 900. But it was not in general use, the chemist and alchemist alone practising it, till the seventeenth century, whe...
-Beer And Brewing
The most common form of using alcohol in this country is that of Beer. Ale has been for centuries the national beverage of the English. The mead of the Saxons appears to have early merged into it...
-The Brewery
The brewery, when possible, should be a separate apartment, as nothing is worse for the beer than to allow the place in which it is made to be used for washing, etc. Any place well-covered in and v...
-Brewing Utensils
Every brewhouse, large or small, must have its plant or proper utensils; these are - 1. The copper for the liquor or wort, or when possible two coppers are better, one for the water and one for the...
-Materials Used In Brewing
The materials required for brewing pure beer are Malt, Hops, Yeast, and water and isinglass for fining - (this is dissolved in sour beer). Malt is made from barley, wheat, oats, or rye; but barley ...
-The Process Of Brewing
We give our readers now the process of brewing, as carried on in the writer's family very many years ago - when, in fact, George III. was king - and which produced a home-brewed ale rarely equalled th...
-The Process Of Brewing. Continued
How To Brew 54 Gallons Of Strong Ale 10 bushels of malt. 10 lbs. of hops. Water to make up 54 gallons. Bitter Ale One Hogshead: 4 bushels of pale malt. 8 lbs. of hops. Water To Make ...
-Beer Fermentation
The principal points to be taken into consideration in the fermentation of beer, is the weather, the yeast, and the proper performance of mashing. If the weather is thundery, it is likely to promot...
-Proper Management Of The Beer Cellar
In order to keep strong beer in a proper state of preservation, remember that when once the vessel is broached regard must be paid to the time in which it may be finished. If it is likely to be drunk ...
-Proper Management Of The Beer Cellar. Continued
Fining With Isinglass When beer is required to become fine, before it has worked itself so, or if it does not do so in proper time, isinglass is used to assist it; and this is better than the wheat...
-Bottling Beer
The first thing to be done is to see that the bottles are very clean, and very dry. Wet bottles will turn the beer mouldy, or mothery, as it is called. Next the corks must be new and sound; for i...
-How To Preserve Yeast For Brewing
When you have plenty of yeast, take a quantity of it, stir and work it well with a whisk until it becomes liquid and thin. Then get a clean deal board, and with a soft brush lay a thin layer of yeast ...
-Cider
Cider is a spirit distilled from the expressed juice of apples. The best apples for cider are not those used at dessert, or for cooking, but rough apples which have a light colour with a maze of re...
-Daily Duties Of The House-Mother. Feeding The Family
Having attained some knowledge of the constituent parts, prices, and season for different kinds of food, the house-mother will have less difficulty in arranging the daily bill of fare. She should v...
-Daily Duties Of The House-Mother. Feeding The Family. Part 2
We name these different modes of making rechauffes to help in the ordering of dinner and suggest the variety which may spring from one joint. Cheese must be kept covered. When it is down too near t...
-Daily Duties Of The House-Mother. Feeding The Family. Part 3
After having thus far guided the house-mother, we must say a few words on marketing. It is certainly best to go to market (if distance permits) in person. The senses will help in selecting the best...
-Daily Duties Of The House-Mother. Feeding The Family. Part 4
How To Keep Recipes The usual way of keeping recipes on files dated with the year is a good one; but a friend has made (for the Editor) a very neat and ingenious case of brown holland, which hangs ...
-Daily Duties Of The House-Mother. Feeding The Family. Part 5
On The Table Lobster cutlets. Fish cakes. Kippered salmon. Shrimp toast. Kidneys stewed in wine. Kidneys broiled. Devilled kidneys. Poached eggs with cream. Rumbled eggs. Tomatoes and eggs. Birds' ...
-The Lady's Social Duties
Use hospitality one to another without grudging. In addition to her household duties the lady of a house has social duties to perform, which she is equally concerned in fulfilling well and gracef...
-The Lady's Social Duties. Part 2
Dinner For Eight People January Hare Soup. Cod's Head and Shoulders. Oyster Sauce. Side Dishes Handed, Principal Dishes. Oyster Patties. Saddle of Mutton. Cotelettes a la Maintenon. Boi...
-The Lady's Social Duties. Part 3
July White Soup. Julienne Soup. Turbot. Spatchcock Eels. Side Dishes Handed Veal Patties. Lobster Cutlets. Lamb Sweetbread:-. Plovers. Principal Dishes Turkey Poults. Saddle of Mutto...
-Etiquette Of A Dinner Party
The lady who gives a dinner party should be very punctual, especially if she is one of those who have no house-keeper nor a very large number of efficient servants. She should be in the drawing-room s...
-Etiquette Of A Dinner Party. Part 2
Soup is put opposite to the lady of the house. If there are two soups, a tureen will be at each end and be succeeded by two kinds of fish. It may be that the soup is before the lady, and the fish a...
-Etiquette Of A Dinner Party. Part 3
Cod Fish. Sirloin of Beef. Rolled ribs, and a round of beef, are easily carved in horizontal slices over the whole surface. The slices should be very thin. Boiled beef should also be cu...
-Morning Parties
Morning parties, so calied (royal breakfasts occuring at 5 P.M. occasionally), are generally given during the summer or autumn months. In town they are garden parties, breakfasts, five o'clock teas, o...
-Evening Parties
Evening parties vary extremely. They are sometimes for cards, sometimes for music, sometimes for a conversazione with occasional singing, sometimes a friendly dance; but this should be specified in th...
-The Ball-Room
Invitations to a ball should be issued by the lady of the house in her Own name only, about three weeks before the night fixed on for it. The requisites for an agreeable ball are - a good room, goo...
-How To Cook A Boar's Head
How To Dress A Boar's Head (An Ancient Christmas Dish). After scalding off the hair from the head, and removing the snout, have it thoroughly cleaned and boned ; then place it in a deep pan, wit...
-Roast Swan
This splendid dish, worthy of a pence's table, is only too locally known. It is, of course, only eligible for the table in its cygnet state. Young swans are called cygnets from the Latin name for the ...
-Wassail Bowl
One bottle of sherry, half a pint of cold water, six or seven eggs, according to size, quarter of a pound of powdered sugar, a little nutmeg, and a few cloves, half a pound of macaroons, half a pound ...
-Christmas Recipes
The Gravy To a gravy of beef (good and strong) I opine, You'll be right if you add half a pint of port wine: Pour this through the Swan - yes, quite through the belly, Then serve the whole up with ...
-The Wedding
The trousseau, breakfast, and wedding-cake, are given by the bride's family. The bridesmaids are chosen, and the bridegroom's best man, and the guests are invited. The number of bridesmaids va...
-Country Visits
Visiting in the country is always pleasant. Nowhere does society present a more attractive aspect than at the well-regulated countiy-seat. The lady who thus receives guests will, however, remember ...
-Morning Calls
A morning call should not be paid before three p.m., nor after six. No one has a right to intrude (unless by permission) on the quiet morning occupations of a family; nor to detain them in the drawing...
-Introductions And Letters Of Introduction
Never introduce people to each other unless you feel quite sure that it will be agreeable to both parties. We have said before that it is right to introduce the gentleman to the lady, even when the so...
-Notes Of Invitation, Etc
Notes of invitation and reply should be written on small paper of the very best quality. For large parties, balls, etc, people now generally use printed cards. When a note of invitation to dinner i...
-The Etiquette Of Walking, Riding, And Driving
A well-bred woman will endeavour to acquire an elegant walk. She will hold herself erect without stiffness, and walk without a footfall being audible in the house. In the road or street she should als...
-Presentation At Court
The wives and daughters of the nobility are of course eligible for presentation at Court, unless there is an objection on the part of the Sovereign from some moral cause. Only ladies of good character...
-Duties To The Poor
The House-mother should spare something from her abundance, and even from her poverty, for the poor. In most country houses soup is given away twice a week, and skimmed milk oftener, to the very poor....
-Furs, And Skins Of Birds
What they are - How to Preserve - How to Clean and Prepare. The use of furs in England as an article of dress did not become general till the fourteenth century. In 1670 - reign of Charles II. -...
-How To Preserve Skins Of Birds For Hats
After the bird has been carefully skinned, the skin should be nailed out on a board with the feathers downwards, and having been well peppered, should be rubbed with a strong solution of alum and left...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother
It is often said that there are few good servants now: I say there are few good mistresses now .... mistresses now seem to think the house is in charge of itself. They neither know how to give orders...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 2
How To Test The Purity Of The Atmosphere Fill a glass tumbler with lime water, and place it in any convenient position. The rapidity with which a pellicle forms on its surface corresponds to the am...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 3
How To Clean Floor Cloths Sweep them, and wash them now and then with milk; never scour them with a brush, or use soap or hot water to them, as it would take off the paint. A soft cloth and lukewar...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 4
How To Clean Alabaster Alabaster is so called from Ala-bastron, the name of a small town in Upper Egypt, near which the stone was very abundant. There are two kinds of alabaster, one a white semi-t...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 5
A Capital Receipt For Polishing Tables Cold-drawn linseed oil, I pint; spirits of wine, I oz.; white tonic vinegar, I pint; spirits of turpentine, 1 oz.; powdered gum arabic, 1/2 oz.; butter of ant...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 6
How To Clean And Lay By Curtains In summer it is usual to lay by curtains of rep, damask, or chintz, and replace them with lace or muslin curtains, which look much cooler, and the more expensive re...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 7
How To Clean Candlesticks Melt all the wax or grease off with boiling water; but on no account melt it by putting the candlesticks before the fire, as it melts the solder. Tin candlesticks must be ...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 8
How To Take Stains Out Of Silver Steep the plate in soap, let it lie for four hours, then cover it with whiting wet with vinegar, so that it may stick upon the silver, and dry it by the fire; after...
-Cleanliness. The House-Mother. Part 9
How To Make Windows Like Ground Glass Make a hot solution of sal-ammoniac. Brush the solution over the pane or panes; the moisture will instantly evaporate and leave a beautiful radiated deposit. ...
-How To Clean Paint
This receipt is given in an American publication. Get some of the best whiting; powder it and then sift it, so that it may be as fine as possible. Put it in a plate for use. Get some clean warm wat...
-How To Clean Carpets
Carpets should be swept the way of the pile, with wet tea-leaves, to prevent the dust from flying over the curtains and furniture. A short-handled soft brush should be used for valuable carpets, and t...
-How To Clean Marble
One oz. of potash, 2 oz. of whitening, and a square of yellow soap, cut into small pieces; boil all together in a saucepan, until it begins to thicken; apply this with a large brush to the marble. If ...
-How To Clean Wood Furniture
The greatest care should be taken to keep furniture fresh and clean. If the house-wife is neat and careful her property will last much longer than otherwise, and her dwelling will always possess a cha...
-The Laundry
Washing is in the present day seldom done at home, unless the family reside in the country, for drying-ground in London and other large towns is wanting. The laundress, therefore, fetches the soiled l...
-The Laundry. Continued
How To Wash Clothes Half a pound of yellow soap, I lb. of soda, 1/4 lb. of lime, to three quarts of boiling water; let the lime and water remain all night; boil the soda and soap to a paste in thre...
-Fuel. Coals - Coke - Wood - Charcoal
Coal is composed of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulphur, besides the mineral substances which remain in the ash. Wood contains the same elements, with the exception of sulphur and nitro...
-The Stable-Yard And Its Occupants
Of all animals destined for the use of man the horse is the most useful and profitable, as he is the most noble, generous, and patient, conducing most to our profit, pleasure, and sport, notwithstandi...
-The Stable-Yard And Its Occupants. Part 2
Sewers There are four conditions which are to be regarded as indispensable in the construction of all drains from all buildings whatsoever. These conditions are: - Firstly, that the entire length o...
-The Stable-Yard And Its Occupants. Part 3
Plans The plan of the building will vary very much according to the aspect disposition of land and other premises, and other local circumstances. These should be very carefully studied, and the pla...
-The Stable-Yard And Its Occupants. Part 4
Partitions The partition for stalls will be match-lined both sides, and about four feet two inches high in rear, with a ramp and rising to six feet two inches towards the mangers; with iron pillar ...
-The Stable-Yard And Its Occupants. Part 5
Stable Utensils Under this head is included all that is used in dressing the horse, and in cleansing the yard and stable. The pitchfork is used to shake up the straw, of which the horses' bed is...
-Advice As To How To Purchase A Horse
To the inexperienced the purchase of a horse is a matter of some little difficulty and risk, and the object of this treatise is to throw out some few hints to enable the intending purchaser to ascerta...
-How To Buy The Hack, Or Riding Horse
In selecting a riding horse much must depend upon the size and weight of the rider. The best and most useful size is from I5hds. to I5hds. 2in. The most fashionable colours are bay, brown, and dark ch...
-How To Buy The Ladies' Horse
A perfect ladies' horse is of all descriptions the most difficult to find. So many good qualities, which, though desirable in all riding horses, may be overlooked in those for men, are here absolutely...
-How To Buy The Hunter Horse
In selecting a hunter it is necessary to bear in mind the country i\\ which he is to be ridden. In the grass countries of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, etc, the hunter must be nearly if not quite ...
-How To Buy Cobs And Ponies
The cob is a strong little horse, about 14hds. high, and of various descriptions. The better class are bred principally in Norfolk or Lincolnshire. When well bred and good-looking, with action, they a...
-Defects, Diseases, And Faults To Be Avoided In All Horses
A Loose, Weak Neck Horses so formed are extremely unpleasant to ride; they get their heads up, cannot see where they are going, and it is impossible to feel their mouths. Twisted Fore-Legs Ho...
-Occasional Ailments Of Horses
Horses are subject to various ailments arising either from accident or disease, too numerous to mention in a treatise of this kind. The following are a few of the most common. In all that are serious,...
-Stable Servants
The coachman must be a steady, sober, good-tempered, and respectable man, his office being in most cases a very responsible one; many masters, either from want of energy, or through ignorance, leaving...
-Stable Management Of The Horse
In the morning the first thing the groom does on entering the stable, which must not be later than six o'clock, if the weather be warm and fine will be to open the door and admit some fresh air; he wi...
-Horse Food
Hay for horses should invariably be the best quality; many different sorts and conditions being more or less detrimental to the digestion and wind. Good old upland meadow hay is the best, as being the...
-Feeding Horses
The ordinary food for horses is corn and hay. They should have the corn four times a day - at about seven, eleven, three and seven; and the hay twice - at night and in the morning. These times may be ...
-Summering The Hunter
There still exists much difference of opinion on this point, but when we consider that the great object to be attained is rest, it must be evident to all who have seen horses at grass in the summer, t...
-Exercise And Work
Unless the weather is wet and bad, every horse, whether in a stall or box, is better for going out every day. The work of a carriage horse does not on an average exceed seven or eight miles. They a...
-Clipping Or Singeing Horses
Is one of the greatest improvements ever introduced into stable management. It is a blessing not only to the horse, but to every one who uses and attends to him. A horse clipped or singed will not onl...
-Tricks And Vices To Which Horses Are Liable
Some of which arise from fear and nervousness, and others from vice or from improper breaking. All vicious and nervous horses should be avoided by all who do not thoroughly understand them. Of these r...
-Harness For Saddle Horses
These consist of saddles, bridles, breast-plates and martingales. Saddles may be had of almost any size or weight, to suit the rider, one of twelve or fourteen pounds is about the average weight. T...
-Harness For Saddle Horses. Continued
The Martingale Is used to steady the horse's head, and keep it in its proper place. It is generally used on loose weak-necked horses, and though of service in the hands of the experienced, it is...
-Modern Carriages
Are of various sorts and sizes, from the small pony-chaise to the heavy family coach or landau. They should be made of the very best materials and purchased of first-rate builders, to ensure wearing w...
-Modern Carriages. Continued
The Skeleton Phaeton Is the lightest four-wheel carriage there is; it is not often used except where great lightness is required. To look well it must be very neatly and stylishly built. Price abou...
-The Dairy
Observations On The Dairy A dairy of cows, when well selected and managed, is no doubt a source of profitable employment where there is plenty of provision and accommodation for such stock: particu...
-The Dairy. Part 2
Different Kinds Of Cows The large kinds of cows are generally chosen where there are rich fertile pastures; and no doubt the dominant breed throughout the country, both for indoor and outdoor feedi...
-The Dairy. Part 3
Cost Of Keep Cows are large consumers of food and should not be stinted when in milk. Heifers will require nothing but green food in the dry summer months; but as the winter approaches they should ...
-Diseases Of Cows
It is indispensably necessary to have a vigilant experienced herdsman at the time that cows are expected to calve. Many a young heifer has been spoiled for want of attention at this critical period. W...
-Diseases Of Calves
Calves are often subject to diarrhoea when sucking or weaning. The certain remedy is to lessen the usual food and give two or three glasses of port wine and a piece of opium about the size of a pea. I...
-Milk
What is milk? Men of science inform us, that it is a connecting and intermediate substance between animals and vegetables. Almost every kind of the mammalia class has something different in the compo...
-The Dairy Maid's Duties
Punctuality, order, and cleanliness must be observed in all dairy work. The dairy-maid should be an early riser, for, in the summer months especially, much of her work will have to be done before b...
-How To Churn Butter
Fill your churn and butter stand with cold water over night. If summer time, and the weather should be very hot, rise about three or four in the morning, then skim any pans you may have ready, empty t...
-The Cow House
The milking or cow-house should be situated within a short distance of the dairy. If it were within a few steps it would be so much the better, as the milkers could then empty their pails into the pan...
-Hints On Cow Milking
Milking Those who milk cows should be well looked after, and in large butter and cheese making dairies some trusty person should always follow the milkers to watch their proceedings and to ascertai...
-Gloucestershire Cheese
In the month of April the process of cheese making- generally begins, though it is not till after the cows are fed in good pastures that the blue mould will be on it which is a sign of richness. On...
-Cheddar Cheeses
Pour the milk through a sieve into a cheese tub as it is drawn or milked in the evening. But if very hot weather, place large vessels in a tank of water, and pour it into them, to cool till morning. T...
-Truckle Cheeses
Truckle cheeses are usually made in the autumn months, after the excessive heat of summer is over; during which they are liable to heave and bulge, owing to fermentation occasioned by the hot weather....
-Cheeses
Stilton Cheese Put the night's cream into the morning's milk with the rennet as before described. When the curd is formed it must not be broken, but taken out whole with the skimming dish, and plac...
-Parmesan Cheese
A moderate wood fire in a stove, adapted for the purpose and placed two feet below the surface of the ground, is made at ten o'clock in the morning, when sixty-six gallons of milk are poured into a la...
-Leicester Cheese
Put a rack across the cheese-pan or tub and pour the milk through a fine hair sieve into it. Ascertain by the thermometer that the milk is a right heat, - viz., eighty-four degrees, or the curd will n...
-The Poultry Yard
There is no house, however small, with the very least possible piece of outlet, that may not, with a little care and trouble, indulge in the luxury of new-laid eggs, spring chickens, and fat poultry. ...
-The Poultry Yard. Part 2
Fowls allowed to run about are naturally fond of grass and vegetables; any refuse cabbage-leaves, lettuce, and grass-cuttings from the lawn will be most acceptable to them, and should be thrown into t...
-The Poultry Yard. Part 3
A good fattening food for fowls may be made as follows: - Mix the different meals together with boiling water; then add suet, knead all together, and give in balls as much as will rill each fowl. By t...
-Malay Fowl
The Malay fowl is a fine, handsome looking fowl, stands tall, and has a very upright gait. On looking at its comb, you would almost imagine it had been dubbed, as is done with game cocks; but one is l...
-Game Fowl
The Game fowl may justly be called the pure British fowl, and there is no breed of fowl that can in any way compare with the Game in the delicacy, whiteness, and richness of flavour. How grand the Gam...
-Hamburg Fowl
We will now devote a short time to the different descriptions of Hamburg fowls, or more commonly called every-day layers, or everlasting layers. They are most profitable fowls to keep, as they eat lit...
-Polish Fowl
One of the most extraordinary looking fowls is the Polish. They are generally great favourites, from their useful quality as layers, and from the pretty top-knot or tuft on their head. They are compac...
-La Fleche Fowl
A class of fowl lately introduced from France is a bird of extraordinary appearance, from the fact of the comb, which never varies either in cock or hen, being so dissimilar to that of the combs of ot...
-Crevecaeur Fowl
This is another class of French fowl, but not so worthy of consideration for a poultry breeder as the last, as they have not the style in the first instance, and are not so well adapted to our changea...
-Bantams Fowl
Before quitting the subject of fowls, we must describe a few of the various classes of bantams, Who can have failed to observe the proud strut of the bantam cock, surrounded by his diminutive train of...
-Ducks
Ducks may be kept at a trifling expense, and although it has been laid down as a sine qua non that to attempt to keep them without having a pond on the premises is absurd, we are able to assert from t...
-Geese
Are without exception the least expensive poultry to keep. If they can be permitted to roam about at large, their great delight is to wander into green lanes and peck about in the ditches at the side ...
-The Turkey
The turkey is a bird so well known, it is almost superfluous to describe it; for who is there that has not heard the gobble-gobble of the noble-looking turkey-cock, with his proud, defiant strut, his ...
-Pigeons
Pigeons are very profitable things to keep, as they breed every month, but they must be well attended to and have plenty of food. They, like poultry, must be kept very clean. The cot, which should fac...
-Guinea Fowls
Should you have sufficient space, Guinea fowls may be kept, as although the eggs are smaller than the fowl egg, you will have many of them, for they commence laying in April or May and continue...
-The Pea Fowl
Though last in our list of poultry, is by no means the least. It is not in every establishment that this bird can be kept, as, being of a very rambling disposition, it requires space. It loves to roam...
-Fowl Eggs
We will close our few remarks relative to the poultry yard with a few words of advice with regard to eggs. When they are plentiful, about July, they should begin to be saved for winter consumption. Th...
-Breeding Pheasants
The pheasant breeds generally in April, making a very rough nest on the ground; but in these days of battue shooting, it would not do to depend entirely on the hap-hazard chance of wet or dry hatching...
-Pheasants For Aviaries
The Chinese species of pheasants have a much more splendid plumage than the British-bred pheasant. Their plumage is truly magnificent, and should find a place in every aviary. The Golden pheasant is o...
-Domestic Pets. Squirrels
This is a very comprehensive title, and might fairly be supposed to comprise ponies, donkeys, dogs, cats, rabbits, poultry, and pigeons; but this article will be confined to animals kept in the house,...
-Domestic Pets. Mice
The dormouse is very like the squirrel in many of its habits: it lives upon much the same food, and is a hybernating animal too, laying up a store of eatables for the winter, and passing the greater p...
-Domestic Pets. Part 3. Birds
None of these little creatures, however pretty and intelligent they may be, seem to me to be such desirable pets to be kept in the house as Birds, to which the remainder of this article will be devote...
-Domestic Pets. Bullfinch
The bullfinch is a very nice pet; he becomes so attached to his owner, and will not bestow his affection indiscriminately, so that he repays one for any attention given him. He is subject to fits of j...
-Domestic Pets. Goldfinch
The goldfinch is an universal favourite, both from its beauty and sprightliness: it is very restless in a cage, and therefore I do not think it appears as contented as some less active birds; but it w...
-Domestic Pets. Siskin
He is fond of bathing, and should have a bath every day. The goldfinch will sometimes mate with the canary, and the mules are very pretty. He must, however, be taken away from his wife as soon as she ...
-Domestic Pets. Chaffinch
The chaffinch is not valued so much in England as in Germany, where bird-fanciers prize it exceedingly for its song. Indeed, the enthusiasm about it is so great that in some of the villages the inhabi...
-Domestic Pets. Canaries
If my readers desire to have a nursery of young birds, they will find canaries the best in every respect to rear. There is no doubt about their happiness in a cage, if proper attention be paid to them...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Part 2
Variety in their food is necessary for all birds; and if they have this, and the seed is good and sound, and they are not exposed to draughts or sudden changes of temperature, they will rarely have an...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Part 3
The hen generally lays four or five eggs, and sits thirteen or fourteen days, unless she or her mate have a bad habit of eating the eggs. They should be left in the nest, and not touched or interfered...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Part 4
Many of the foreign finches do well in cages or aviaries where a moderate degree of warmth is always preserved: they are very beautiful, and many sing as well as their English relations; but they are ...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Part 5
The beautiful little avadavats and waxbills I have kept, and I can thoroughly recommend them as pets for the drawing-room or conservatory. In the latter atmosphere they flourish best, for they are rat...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Doves
This is the case also with doves, which look very disconsolate without a mate, to whom they are constantly cooing. They are pretty, gentle, quiet birds, and easily tamed. The stock dove, ring dove, tu...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Nightingales
It may be remarked by my readers that I have not recommended the nightingales, larks, and many of our most renowned songsters to be kept in confinement. I have not done so, because they are not fitted...
-Domestic Pets. Birds. Part 6
The Blackcap, which is sometimes called the Mock nightingale, redstart, whitethroat, and other warblers, require much the same treatment. The blackcap should never be without fruit of some kind, cherr...
-Prescriptions For Boils And Carbuncles
Symptoms Boils are distinguishable from carbuncles by their smaller size, by their conical shape, inflamed base, and tendency to form matter at the point. Beneath the matter is a portion of dead ti...
-Prescriptions For Bruises
The variation of the colours of bruises is owing to changes going on in the blood which has been effused under the skin by violence. A bruise generally goes through all the various tints from black to...
-Prescriptions For Graze Or Abrasion
An abrasion of the skin, or what is commonly termed barked skin, is the simplest form of wound. It consists in the superficial skin being rubbed off by violence. This form of injury of course varie...
-Prescriptions For Burns And Scalds
The effect of these will vary with the extent of surface, or the depth of skin injured or destroyed. Recovery, moreover, must depend greatly upon the state of health at the time of the accident. Under...
-Remedy For Cold
A useful means of cure in catarrhal bronchitis or severe cold, is the inhalation of ammonia; thus, put a teaspoonful of spirits of salvolatile in a three-pint jug, with a wide mouth, then fill the j...
-Prescriptions For Spasms Of The Glottis
Symptoms This is a convulsion or spasmodic affection of the upper part of the windpipe, causing sudden difficulty of breathing, and accompanied with a shrill crowing noise resembling that of a youn...
-Prescriptions For Concussion Of The Brain
Symptoms This condition may be the result of either a fall, or blow on the head, or it may be occasioned by a violent jerk to the body, especially to the lower part of the spine. After one or other...
-Prescriptions For Corns
Repeated soaking of the feet in hot water and paring down the corn with a sharp knife, then applying nitrate of silver, and afterwards paring off the hardened black skin. Corn-plasters, having a hole ...
-Prescriptions For Croup
This is a disease which is alarming from the suddenness of its attack and the rapidity with which it runs its fatal course if unchecked; but, on the other hand, in the majority of cases, it is easily ...
-Prescriptions For Diarrhoea
There is a common form of this disorder, which appears very often in hot weather without any other indication, and which if neglected will lead to fully-developed cholera, if that disease or its cause...
-Prescriptions For Dog Bites
These are very much, though somewhat unnecessarily, dreaded, on account of the fear which exists that they may be followed by hydrophobia. When it is considered how many people are bitten by dogs, and...
-Prescriptions For Drowning, Or Suspended Animation
The following instructions, compiled by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, are the result of a wide field of experience: - Restorative Treatment Send immediately for medical assistance, bl...
-Prescriptions For Ear-Ache
Symptoms Deafness, Pain and Noises in the Ear, are often produced by the mere accumulation of wax in the ear. Treatment It will generally suffice to clear out the passage by syringing. A larg...
-Prescriptions For Fainting
Swooning occurs generally from sudden shock, or from large or sudden loss of blood, or any other cause of depression, mental or bodily, such as profuse diarrhoea and affections of the heart. Treatm...
-Prescriptions For Headache
There are few more distressing complaints than a severe headache, few more puzzling to account for in point of suddenness and intensity, and in the rapidity of their disappearance. A nervous headach...
-Prescriptions For Indigestion (Dyspepsia)
Symptoms Various kinds of pain in the region of the stomach, which occur soon after meals. These pains are also sometimes felt between the shoulders and in the back, flatulency causing some distens...
-Prescriptions For Splinters, Thorns, Etc
These should be removed if possible by the use of forceps. If they are left in they may cause inflammation, and the formation of abscesses, or gatherings. If the foreign body cannot be extracted, a...
-Prescriptions For Stings Of Insects, Etc
Symptoms The stings of wasps or ants or bees, as indeed do most of the bites of insects, present very much the appearance of what are called poisoned wounds. The history of the case will generally ...
-Prescriptions For Sunstroke
Symptoms These resemble the symptoms of congestion of the brain, and come on occasionally with great suddenness after exposure to the direct heat of the sun. In other cases the symptoms are slower ...
-Prescriptions For Swallowing Foreign Bodies
It often happens that children swallow money, or other hard substances, such as pins, etc. In these cases, if the substance be completely swallowed, it should be left to take its course through the...
-Prescriptions For Wounds, Cuts, Stabs
These are of several kinds - e.g., incised, contused, lacerated, punctured - requiring each a modified treatment. Incised Wounds These are clean cuts or wounds, with smooth defined edges. Con...
-Articles Suitable For A Medicine Chest
Acetate of ammonia, or Mindererus spirit. Acetate of lead. Adhesive plaster. Aloes. Alum. Bark, compound tincture of. Basilicon ointment. Bicarbonate of soda. Blistering plaste...
-Poisoning And Its Treatment
Symptoms These generally are sudden in their occurrence. As in criminal or accidental poisoning the quantity of the poison is usually large, the symptoms are both sudden and severe. In criminal poi...
-Classification Of Poisons
The poisons most commonly met with may be divided into three classes - viz., animal, vegetable, and mineral; of these the two latter ar more numerous, or at all events more commonly met with than the ...
-Classification Of Poisons. Part 2
Aconite (Monkshood)(See Plate) Symptoms A sensation of burning, tingling, or numbness, in the mouth and throat. Giddiness, loss of power to stand firmly, pain in the region of the stomach, froth...
-Classification Of Poisons. Part 3
Gamboge (Cambogid) Symptoms Violent vomiting, severe pain in the stomach and excessive purging, followed by great prostration of strength. Treatment Carbonate of potash should be given as ...
-Classification Of Poisons. Part 4
Indian Hemp (Cannabis In-Died). Haschisch Symptoms Much the same as those of opium, but are of a much more pleasant nature to the patient, being associated with delightful dreams and visions. ...
-Classification Of Poisons. Part 5
Opium: An Extract From The Poppy (Papaversomnifera) Symptoms Drowsiness, stupor, delirium, pallid countenance, contracted pupil, sighing, loud or snoring respiration, cold sweats, coma, and deat...
-Classification Of Poisons. Part 6
Mineral Poisons The mineral poisons are perhaps those most commonly used for criminal or suicidal purposes, and they are certainly more easily detected by chemical means than are either the vegetab...
-Classification Of Poisons. Part 7
Copper (Bine Vitriol. Mineral Green Verdigris) Symptoms These, again, are much the same as in arsenic, but rather less acute. It may here be stated that many alleged cases of poison by verdigris...
-Arsenic Poisoning (Realgar Or Red Arsenic, White Arsenic, Scheele's Green, Orpiment, Or Yellow Arsenic)
Symptoms An unpleasantly strong metallic taste, a tightness in the throat, vomiting of a brown mucous character mixed with blood, fainting, great thirst, excessive pain in the stomach with shiverin...
-Mercury Poisoning (Corrosive Sublimate. Calomel. White Precipitate)
Symptoms Intense metallic taste in the mouth, pain in the stomach, purging, vomiting, etc., in fact, the symptoms of nearly all metallic poisons are similar. There are, of course, certain peculiari...
-On The Management Of The Sickroom, Nursing, Diet, Etc. Chapter I. The Management Of The Sick-Room
The arrangements of the sick-room require attention, and demand special notice. They influence very much the result, and may indeed, where faulty, baffle the efforts of medicine. We would lay down the...
-The Management Of The Sick-Room. Part 2
Lotions, Fomentations, Etc External applications of various kinds are of so much use in the treatment of disease that a few directions as to their mode of use cannot be misplaced. Lotions The...
-The Management Of The Sick-Room. Part 3
Counter-Irritants And External Stimulants The following are the chief agents of this class mentioned in this essay: - Blistering plaster. Tincture, liniment, and ointment of iodine. Compou...
-The Nurse
It is not always possible to meet with a well-trained nurse, even in a large town, while for those who are likely to consult the pages of this book it may be an impossibility to meet with a professed ...
-Poulticing
So common a thing as a poultice might seem beneath notice in such a treatise as the present, but some hints may be given thereon to the nurse. Thus in making a linseed-meal poultice most persons po...
-Blistering Plaster And Liquid
Blistering a surface with cantharides may be effected in two ways; one, by the application of the ordinary blister plaster, the other by painting with blistering liquid. When the plaster is used it...
-Chapter II. Baths And Bathing
In infancy, bathing or washing at least twice a day is necessary to pre serve the skin in a healthy condition. In so doing, however, care must be taken that the surface of the body be not chilled; a j...
-Baths And Bathing. Continued
The Tepid Bath The Tepid Bath (temperature 700 to 8oo) is suitable for those whose health, or sensitiveness to cold, forbids the use of the cold bath. The same rules, however, apply, especially as ...
-Chapter III. Sleep
No rule can be observed with regard to the proportion of time that should be given to sleep. Much depends upon individual habit and disposition. The active mind and cheerful disposition that is never ...
-Chapter IV. Climate
This word embraces the consideration of many topics which our limits forbid our touching upon; but as the present work will doubtless be read in all parts of the world (at least such is our hope), it ...
-Chapter V. Diet In Relation To Disease
In acute diseases the diet should generally be of the simplest and lightest kind, such as beef-tea or mutton-broth, sago, tapioca, arrowroot, or gruel, with, at the same time, some little respect paid...
-Diet In Relation To Disease. Part 2
Feeding-Bottles Objectionable The next point, and one (if possible) more important, is that the feeding-bottle should be most scrupulously cleaned each time immediately after feeding, or small quan...
-Diet In Relation To Disease. Part 3
Eggs For the same reason the white of eggs, which consists wholly of albumen, is a most excellent medium of nutriment where, for any reason, beef-tea cannot be given. The white of egg stirred into ...
-Diet In Relation To Disease. Part 4
Farinaceous Foods Farinaceous foods should be cautiously given to young infants. Neither the secretion of the saliva in the mouth, nor of the gastric juice in the stomach, is adapted for their dige...
-Alcoholic Stimulants In The Treatment Of Disease
The treatment of disease, and more particularly of convalescence, can scarcely be conducted without the administration of stimulants; but it is obvious that it should be accompanied with emphatic caut...
-Chapter VI. Disinfection
The following directions, prepared from instructions published by the Association of Medical Officers of Health in London, will be found useful for the prevention of the spread of infectious diseases:...









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