- This makes its attack in a sudden and marked manner. There are no premonitory symptoms except, perhaps, a little languor and debility, slight headache, and a bad taste in the mouth, sometimes some pain in the joints. Its commencement is with a chill, sometimes slight, sometimes severe and prolonged. The chill may begin in the feet, or shoul- . ders, or back, running thence like streams of cold water. There is seldom more than this one chill, the fever coming on afterward without the cold stage. At certain periods of the day there is greater intensity of the symptoms, and possibly the chill, though probably not. Between these periods of increased fever the disease seems to decrease, though there is still some fever. Unlike fever and ague, it does not go entirely off. During the hot stage the pulse is up to 120, or still higher, and there are pains in the head, back and limbs, of the most distressing kind. The tongue is covered with a yellowish fur, and, in bad cases, is parched, brown or almost black in the center, and red at the edges. The appetite is gone, and there is generally nausea and vomiting, and pain or tenderness in the upper part of the bowels. At first there is costiveness, but afterward the bowels become loose, and the evacuations are dark and offensive. This disease is produced by malaria, and prevails in hot climates, and in our summer and autumn. In the very beginning the disease may be arrested by an emetic of lobelia or ipecac, followed by a mild cathartic. But if the disease is fully developed, sponge the body all over several times a day with water, and give cooling drinks, such as cream Tartar, two scruples, in a quart of water, lemonade, etc. To allay the fever, give tincture of veratrum viride in ten-drop doses. Cold water and ice may be given the patient, if desired. Cool the head, when it aches, with cold applications, and put a mustard poultice on the stomach if tender. During the remissions between the fever, quinine and other tonics must be given, as in fever and ague.