Gather up the fragments that nothing be lost or wasted. When each meal is over, if you do not have a crumb-cloth under the table, which, when the chairs are removed, can be lifted carefully at the edges and the crumbs shaken into the center, it is best to take a broom and sweep the crumbs lightly under the table until the dishes and victuals are removed, then brush 29 on a dust pan. To clear the table, bring in a dish-pan, gather up all the silver, cups and saucers, butter and sauce plates, and glassware, carry to the kitchen, place them in the sink and return with the pan. Scrape the plates as clean as possible and put in, add platters and vegetable dishes, saving all the remnants of food that are to be kept, on smaller dishes, to be taken to the cellar or refrigerator. To wash the dishes, have clear hot water in the pan, and first wash the silver without soap or cloth, using only the hands; if any are greasy, wipe with a soft paper before putting in the water, rinse in clear hot water and wipe off immediately on a perfectly dry, soft, clean towel; in this way the silver is kept bright, and does not get scratched. Add some soap in the water, make a suds, wash the glassware, rinse and wipe dry. Next take cups and saucers and so on, leaving those most greasy till the last. Always keep a clean dish-cloth. One lady writes, "I have smelt a whole houseful of typhoid fever in one sour, dirty dish-rag." Many prefer the use of three dish-cloths, one for the nicest articles, one for the greasy dishes, and one for the pots and kettles, keeping each cloth perfectly sweet and clean, and, after using it, washing, rinsing, and hanging to dry on a small rack kept for this purpose. The towel for wiping dishes may also dry here. A dish mop or swab for washing small deep articles is convenient.

Let no one suppose that because she lives in a small house, and dines on homely fare, that the general principles here laid down do not apply to her. A small house is more easily kept clean than a palace; taste may be quite as well displayed in the arrangement of dishes on a pine table as in grouping the silver and china of the rich. Skill in cooking is as readily shewn in a baked potato or a johnny-cake as in a canvass-back duck. The charm of good housekeeping lies in a nice attention to little things, not in a superabundance. A dirty kitchen and bad cooking have driven many a husband and son, and many a daughter too, from a home that should have been a refuge from temptation. " Bad dinners go hand in hand with total deprav-Sty; while a properly fed man is already half saved.'

Dinner Of Five Courses. For ten persons, with 12 covers laid, two extra covers are for accidental guests.

Dinner Of Five Courses. For ten persons, with 12 covers laid, two extra covers are for accidental guests.