- The first object of dress is protection of the body, second to enhance and bring out its beauty. Dress which does not enhance the beauty of the wearer, or which attracts attention from the wearer to itself, is out of taste. To be in correct taste it must be "becoming," and in this sense dressing is an art worthy of the attention and study of the most intellectual and accomplished woman. The beauty of dress, to a cultivated eyer does not lie in its money value, but in its perfection in detail and per-feet adaptation to the wearer and the occasion for which it is intended. Any simpleton in petticoats, who has plenty of money, can order her clothes from Worth, in the latest Paris styles, but some quiet woman, with brains and taste, in simpler costume, will be sure to outshine her in "society." Low-necked dresses, dragging skirts, corsets and stays, pad' dings, heavy skirts which rest on the hips, heavy veils, high-heeled boots and every other unphysiological abomination in dress, mars beauty and de-. stroys health.