- The method of giving this treatment is very simple, and yet very few give them correctly. First, have flannel cloths, made of four thicknesses white shaker-flannel (or pieces of a blanket), sewed across the center from corner to corner, and also all around the edges. Different sizes are needed: one, 10 by 13 inches, for across small of back; one, 12 by 17 inches, for over chest, stomach and bowels; and one, 5 by 18 inches, for down the spine; then one for the throat. And of course one can make any shapes wished; and, where there are children, many different sizes must be in readiness in the bath-room cupboard. Fomentations are good for all pains, aches, inflammations, inactivity of stomach and liver, and are always a success, giving relief to pain at once. Where the case is acute they should be given daily, and in severe cases oftener - if necessary, continuing for two hours at a time. (Have known them to be given for five consecutive hours.) The usual length of time is twenty or twenty-five minutes, giving four or five changes of five minutes each. For a child, if rather weak, give only two or three changes, and repeat oftener, if for pain, 'whenever it returns. The manner of treatment is this: Place on a bed or cot a comforter and blanket. Let patient undress entirely, as he does for a pack, and lie upon the blanket, with a jug of hot water at his feet; then wring the flannel out of boiling water - and there are different ways of doing this - as, to be efficacious, the cloth must be very hot - as hot as patient can bear, and he can bear it a great deal hotter than he thinks. Of course, for children, the one who gives treatment must be the judge. One rule is, what you can bear to your face; or some put one thickness of dry flannel next skin, and then the hot fomentation; or wring flannel with your hands, or have water at 150°. But, for adults, the best way is to immerse flannel in boiling water and wring with a wringer - a small one, fastened to a wooden pail, being very convenient; or, if one has a bath-room, have a sink in that, and fasten wringer to it; or a small tub can be arranged with feet, so it can be moved into any room necessary. The next best way is to place in a foot-tub a cloth of two thicknesses of heavy muslin (flour sack will do), extending over the ends of tub; place flannel folded in center of it, and have two square sticks (two feet long and inch and a half square) ready to place at each end, resting on top of flannel; pour on the boiling water, put in sticks, and let one person take hold of each, turning sticks, bringing up the muslin around it, and then wring in opposite directions; or, if only one person prepares cloths, have another dry muslin cloth, and, after boiling water is poured on flannel, lift all into this dry cloth, and then wring. This is rather severe on the hands, but can be done. Now put flannel on part to be fomented, and bring up one side of blanket, then the other, and then comforter, placing a cold wet cloth on head. (If patient is sick in bed, a piece of dry flannel can be placed under him, if back is to be fomented or if the upper part of body, over the fomentation cloths, and then, in either case, tuck bed clothes well around him.) Let flannel remain five minutes, wring again; or, if you have two cloths, have second one ready, and let it remain on five minutes, and so on for twenty or thirty minutes. In chronic diseases repeat this three or four times a week, and it will prove to be one of the best treatments to reduce chronic inflammation and congestion of the stomach, liver, bowels, spleen, and kidneys. After the fomentations, sponge off part fomented with tepid water, rub dry with a towel, and oil with sweet or cocoanut oil; and if for pain or soreness, use sweet oil and ammonia, prepared by dropping ammonia into sweet oil till it becomes white (to a two-ounce bottle of oil, three or four drops). This rubbing with oil prevents taking cold. In pneumonia nothing is better than hot fomentations given as described. In rheumatic fever, add cooking-soda to the water, in proportion of table-spoon to a quart of water, and foment right over the heart. In rheumatism, neuralgia, bilious colic, etc., etc., fomentations avail much, giving instantaneous relief sometimes. Sickness at the stomach, a dizzy, heavy feeling, and severe pain in head, will all be relieved at once by fomenting the stomach. For a babe who has severe colic, when fomentations are applied with two thicknesses of flannel next skin, and with care, they are just the thing. In any bronchial or lung trouble, these given over the lungs, chest and throat, extending half way around neck, have been known to in time effect a cure where the voice had been almost lost. The effect of fomentations is to bring the blood to the surface, and thus prevent inflammation and congestion. They can be taken any time, except half an before or an hour and a half after eating.