- Plants that require a high or low temperature, or a very moist atmosphere, and plants that bloom only in summer are undesirable. Procure fresh sandy loam, with an equal mixture of well rotted turf, leaf mold and cow-yard manure, with a small quantity of soot. In repotting use one size larger than they were grown in; hard burned or glazed pots prevent the circulation of air. Secure drainage by broken crockery and pebbles laid in the bottom of the pot. An abundance of light is important, and when this can not be given, it is useless to attempt the culture of flowering plants. If possible they should have the morning sun, as one hour of sunshine then is worth two in the afternoon. Fresh air is also essential, but cold, chilling draughts should be avoided. Water from one to three times a week with soft luke-warm water, draining off all not absorbed by the earth. Do not permit water to stand in the saucers, as the only plant thriving under such treatment are calla lilies, and even for these it is not necessary unless while blooming. Dust is a great obstacle to the growth of plants; a good showering will generally remove it, but all the smooth-leaved plants, such as camellias, ivies, etc., should be occasionally sponged to keep the foliage clean and healthy. Plants succeed best in an even temperature ranging from sixty to seventy degrees during the day, with from ten to twelve degrees lower at night. If troubled with insects put them under a box or barrel and smoke from thirty to sixty minutes with tobacco leaves. For the red spider, the best remedy is to lay the plants on the side and sprinkle well or shower. Repeat if necessary. The soil should be frequently stirred to prevent caking. If manures are used give in a liquid form. Some of the most suitable plants for parlor culture are pelargoniums, geraniums, fuchsias, palms, begonias, monthly roses, camellias, azaleas, oranges, lemons, Chinese and English primroses, abutilons, narcisus, heliotrope, stevias, bouvardias, petunias, and the gorgeous flowering plant poinsettia pulcherrima. Camellias and azaleas require a cooler temperature than most plants, and the poinsettia a higher temperature. Do not sprinkle the foliage of the camellias while the flower-bods are swelling, as it will cause them to droop, nor sprinkle them in the sunshine. They should have a temperature of about forty degrees and more shade. By following these rules, healthy flowering plants will be the result. - J. S. Robinson.