- This old-fashioned luxury is really a delicious dish when properly prepared. Take a six-quart pail full of ashes (hard wood ashes, if possible, as they are stronger); put them into an iron kettle with three gallons of water; let them boil about rive minutes, then set off from the fire, and turn in a pint of cold water to settle it. The water should then feel a little slippery. Turn off the lye and strain; put it into an iron kettle, and put in six quarts of shelled corn; put it over a brisk fire, and let it boil half an hour, skimming and stirring frequently (the outside skin of the kernel's will then slip off); strain off the lye, and rinse thoroughly in several clear waters. When the lye is thus weakened, turn the corn into a large dish-pan, and turn in water enough to cover it; then rub thoroughly with the hands, till the black chits come off; rinse and strain off till the water looks clear; then put back into a clean kettle, with water enough to cover it, and let it boil; then turn off water, put on again, and parboil three or four times (it will swell to about double the first quantity); the last time boil till quite soft; it may be necessary to add water occasionally; stir often, so as not to burn at the bottom of the kettle; when quite soft, put in two large table-spoons of salt, and stir well; to be eaten with milk, or butter and sugar. It is a wholesome dish, and although there is trouble in preparing it, yet it is good enough to pay for the labor and trouble. It is good either hot or cold, and was considered by our grandparents to be one of the greatest luxuries of the table. Wheat hulled in the same way is considered a great delicacy, and a very beneficial diet for invalids, but is not so staple or nutritious as Indian corn. Smaller quantities can be prepared by using less lye and corn.