Jellice

- One-half tea-spoon of currant, lemon or cranberry jelly put into a goblet, beat well with two table-spoons water, fill up with ice-water, and you have a refreshing drink for a fever patient.

Fever Drink

- Pour cold water on wheat bran, let boil half an hour, strain and add sugar and lemon-juice. Pour boiling water on flax-seed, let stand till it is ropy, pour into hot lemonade and drink.

Barley Water

- Add two ounces pearl barley to half pint boiling water; let simmer five minutes, drain and add two quarts boiling water; add two ounces sliced figs, and two ounces stoned raisins; boil until reduced to a quart; strain for drink.

Beef-Tea Soup

To one pint of "beef essence" (made in a bottle as directed in recipe on a succeeding page), quite hot, add a tea-cup of the best cream, well heated, into which the yolk of a fresh egg has been previously stirred, mix carefully together, and season slightly, and serve.

How To Prevent Wearing Through The Skin When Bed-Ridden

Apply to tender parts of the body with a feather, a mixture made by beating to a strong froth, the white of an egg, dropping in while beating two tea-spoons spirits of wine. Bottle for use.

How To Drop Medicine

Shake the bottle so as to moisten the cork. With the wet end of the cork moisten the edges of the mouth of the bottle, then, holding the cork under the mouth, let the fluid pass over the cork in dropping.

Vegetable Soup

- Two tomatoes, two potatoes, two onions, and one tablespoon rice; boil the whole in one quart of water for one hour, season with salt, dip dry toast in this till quite soft, and eat; this may be used when animal food is not allowed.

Currant Shrub

- Make the same as jelly, but boil only ten minutes; when cool, bottle and cork tight, (see directions for canned fruits). Raspberry, strawberry and blackberry shrubs are made in the same way; when used, put in two-thirds ice-water.

Oat-Meal Blanc-Mange

A delicious blanc-mange is made by stirring two heaping table-spoons of oat-meal into a little cold water, then stir with a quart of boiling milk, flavor and pour into molds to cool, when cream or jelly may be eaten with it.

Mulled Buttermilk

- Put on good buttermilk, and when it boils, add the well-beaten yolk of an egg. Let boil up and serve. Or, stir into boiling buttermilk thickening made of cold buttermilk and flour. This is excellent for convalescing patients.

Oat-Meal Gruel

Put two heaping table-spoons oat-meal in one quart cold water, stir till it commences to boil, then cook one hour, stirring occasionally; do not let it scorch; season with salt, sugar, and any spice desired. For infants and very sick patients it must be strained, and not salted.

Broiled Chicken, Quail, Squirrel Or Woodcock

- Any of these must be tender. Take the breast of the first two, or the thighs of the others; place on hot coals or on a broiler, turning often to prevent burning. When done, remove the burned parts, if any, season slightly with butter, pepper and salt, and serve at once.

Arrowroot Custard

- One table-spoon of arrowroot, one pint of milk, one egg, two table-spoons sugar; mix the arrowroot with a little of the cold milk; put the rest of milk on the Are and boil, and stir in the arrowroot and egg and sugar, well beaten together; scald and pour into cups to cool; any flavoring the invalid prefers may be added.