- First, it is much more convenient if you can have what is called a "packing cot" made. A good proportion for the frame-work is thirty inches wide, twenty-five inches high, with the slats placed on a slight elevation, about three and a half inches, at head. Then a mattress, made to fit (it can be of straw or whatever you wish); on that place an oil-cloth, then a comforter, then a blanket, stripes at side, and a jug of hot water, with a rubber cork, at foot. Now have the patient undress. Take a sheet, and with one hand pleat up the side of it, and with the other double it at middle seam and dip it in a pail of water of the temperature of 96° or 100° (you must allow five or six degrees for cooling off in wringing out sheet), wring and spread over the blanket. Have patient lie on his back in center, with hands over head; bring one side of sheet over the body, tucking it under the near shoulder and up close to the neck, and then between the legs; put arms down at side of body, and bring other side of sheet over the patient and tuck in closely under the side of the body down to the feet, then one side of blanket, then the other, then comforter in same way. In folding the blanket and comforter around neck bring it with one hand, in shape of a V, over the breast, and then fold corner up to the shoulder and tuck in. This saves so much bulk close up to the neck. Now fold a dry sheet across the middle and put over the patient, tucking it in well around the neck, so that no air can get in. The reason of using this extra sheet is, it is so much easier tucked closely around the neck and less bungling than the comforter. It is of great importance that all air be excluded and the work done quickly. Place a cloth wet in cold water on the head, extending over the eyes. If the patient does not warm up quickly, put an extra comforter or blankets over him, and, if necessary, jugs of hot water at the side; for unless he becomes warm soon, the pack will do no good, and he should be taken out. The usual length of a pack is from forty minutes to an hour, for an adult; for a child, from ten minutes to half an hour - according to age and strength. There must be perfect quiet in the room, for much better results are obtained if the patient will sleep: he certainly must not talk. In taking him out unloose comforters and blankets, and pull the wet sheet out quickly and throw over the dry sheet, or, in winter, bring up the blanket. There are several different treatments that follow a pack. If convenient to a bath-room, one can slip in and take a wash-off, or a spray, or a pail-pour. The latter is given by having four pails of water - two of one temperature, 90°, poured over first, and then two of 80°; then wrap around him a dry sheet and take a crash towel and wipe dry, taking, in rotation, arms, breast, back, and legs. Or a dripping sheet can be given right in the room by putting an oil-cloth on the carpet; on that put a foot-tub of water at 104°; the patient stands in this, and a sheet is dipped in a pail half full of water at 90°, or less, taken up by two corners, squeezed slightly, and put around him from the front, lapping be hind, and then rub him (over the sheet) vigorously for a minute; re-dip the sheet (water will be cooler, or some cold may be added to make it about 6° or 8° less than at first), and put it around from behind, and rub again; then remove, and cover with a dry sheet and rub vigorously. This bath is a good treatment taken alone as well as after a pack. It acts as a tonic, and a well person can take it himself. Or, if an oil-bath, sponge or dry rub is given, let him remain on the cot, and, for an oil-bath, rub an arm dry with a crash towel, then rub with oil, and so on; for a sponge-bath, take a sponge (or a towel) and tepid water, and sponge off, rubbing dry with a crash towel; for a dry rub, simply rub dry with a crash towel, rubbing hard to create good circulation. The temperature of the room should be about 75°; and when the patient is taken out of the pack, let no cold air come on him. The temperature of the water in which sheet is dipped, for adults generally, is not so important, as within two or three minutes it becomes of the same temperature as the body; from 90° to 100° is a good range, but for children and delicate persons it should be from 100° to 110°, so as not to shock them. Packs are of great value in reducing fever, in breaking up a cold, in malarial diseases, such as fever and ague, etc.; and also in poor circulation and where the system is weakened and run down it acts as a tonic. In the spring, when the system needs building up, just try a few packs instead of the sulphur and molasses of old times.