- It is composed of the head-meat, trimmings of the hams and shoulders, flitch, smaller parts of the chine, the heart, part of the liver and the skin off the parts intended for lard and sausage. The spleen, kidneys and cracklings are used by some and rejected by others. The feet and ears may also be used. The head is split between the jaws, and after the tongue is taken out it is split through the middle the other way. Cut off one or two inches of the snout and take off the jaw-bone and nasal cavities as far as -the teeth extend, and cut across at the eye and also at the opening of the ear. The meat may then be cleaned out evenly. Put the head meat into the boiler .after putting in water to cover it, add the rest of the meat in a quarter of an hour. The meat must be boiled until it will readily separate from the bones; (the skins should be boiled separately as they take a long time to boil); then taken from the liquid, the bones removed and the meat chopped fine. Strain the liquid to get out the small bones, and add to it enough water to make five parts liquid to three of meat. Set the liquid to boiling, and as soon as it commences stir in meal and boil fifteen or twenty minutes, stirring all the time. Make a moderately thick mush, then put in meat, mixing thoroughly and season to taste. It takes about as much meal as meat, but no buckwheat nor flour. The Indian meal must be ground fine, of new corn, well dried before grinding. The meat must be very finely chopped. Put away in tin pans or earthern pots in cold place. Unless kept very -cold, it will not keep many weeks, but its popularity generally keeps it from spoiling. It is be fried for the table, and eaten hot, of course. Those who are unacquainted with this dish, and many of our readers are, should give it a trial.