Apples are in season all the year; cheapest from August until spring.

Artichokes (Jerusalem) are ready for use in September.

Asparagus from the first of May until middle of June.

Bass, of which there are a dozen varieties, at all times of the year.

Beans, String, June to November; Lima, from July through the year,

Beef is good at all seasons of the year.

Beets from June through the year.

Blackberries from July to September.

Blue Fish, a popular fish on the sea coast, from June to October.

Brant, a choice wild fowl, April and May, and September and October.

Bream, a fish sometimes known as dace, in the winter months.

Broccoli, a kind of cabbage, from September to November.

Buckwheat Cakes in cold weather.

Butternuts ripen in September.

Cabbage, May and June, and lasts through the winter.

Carrots come from the South, in May, and last until November.

Cauliflower from June until spring.

Celery from August to April, but is better after being touched by frost.

Checkerberry in winter and spring.

Cheese all the year round.

Cherries from the south in May, and continue till August.

Chestnuts after the first severe frost.

Chocolate is best in cold weather on account of its richness.

Chub, a fresh-water fish, in fall and winter.

Clams from May until September.

Conger Eels from November to April.

Corn, Green, from June to September.

Crabs from June to January, but are more wholesome in the cold months.

Cranberry from September to April.

Cucumbers in the South, April; in Middle States, June to November.

Currants, green, June to July; ripe, July to August.

Damsons, a small black plum, July to December.

Doves, the turtle, one of the best game birds, in August and September.

Ducks, Domestic, are best in June and July. Wild in spring and fall.

Eels from April till November.

Eggs are always in season, but are cheap in spring and high in winter.

Elderberries August and September.

Fish, as a rule, are in the best condition just before spawning,

Geese, wild, from October to December, tame at four month's old.

Gooseberries from June to September.

Crapes from September till winter.

Guinea Fowl, best in winter when they take the place of partridges.

Haddock,from November and December, and June and July.

Halibut in season all the year.

Herring from February to May.

Herbs for seasoning should be gathered just as they begin to flower.

Horseradish is always in season,

Lamb in March, but from June to August is best as well as cheapest.

Lemons arrive fresh from West Indies in winter.

Lobsters are plentiful in market, except in winter months.

Mackerel from May through the summer.

Mushrooms are most plentiful in August and September.

Muskmelons from July to the middle of September.

Mutton is in season all the year, but is not so good in the fall, the meat being drier and strong flavored.

Onions, new, large, from the Bermudas about May 1st, and from the South in June, and those of home raising in the Middle States the middle of July.

Oranges from Florida and West Indies are in market from October until April; those from the Mediterranean from January until May. The Florida oranges are best and largest

Oysters are in season from September to May; May, June and July being the spawning months.

Partridges, Pheasants or Ruffled Grouse, are in 'season in most markets from September to January, but are best in October and November.

Paw-Paws are ripe about the middle of September.

Peas, Green, reach markets from Bermudas about May 1; from the South May 15; home grown, in the Middle States, about June 15.

Peaches come from the Bermudas May 1; from the South July 1; and are plenty in market from August to November.

Pears which are best for eating are in season from August to October.

Pickerel is best from September to March.

Pigeons, wild, are plentiful in September and October.

Pork should never be eaten in warm weather.

Potatoes, new, arrive from the Bermudas about April; from the South June to July, and are plentiful in July and August.

Potatoes, Sweet, are in season from August to December, after which they lose their flavor.

Prairie Chickens in season from August to October.

Prunes arrive fresh from December to May.

Pumpkins are in season from September to January.

Quail (often called Partridge in the South) from November and December.

Quinces are in season from October to December.

Rabbits are in best condition in November, but are in season from September till January, and in the North later, until the breeding season begins.

Radishes are in season from April till cold weather.

Rail, an excellent little game bird, is best in September and October.

Raspberries are in market from the middle of June till September.

Reed-birds are best in September and October.

Rhubarb from April to September.

Salmon from March till September.

Shad appear in market from February 20 to June.

Smelts are abundant from October to April.

Snipe are in market from March 20 to April 20, and again in October.

Spinach is the earliest vegetable used for greens, and is continued through the season by providing a succession of crops.

Squash - Summer, from June to August; winter, from August through the winter.

Strawberries from the South appear as early as April 1, but are not plentiful until June, and the season is over in July.

Sturgeon from April to September.

Suckers from October to April.

Tomatoes are not plentiful in northern markets before June.

Trout, Brook, are in season from March till August; lake trout from October to March; Mackinaw trout in winter months.

Turkeys are best in fall and winter, though in market at all seasons.

Turnips, new, are in market about June 1, and last through the year.

Turtles are in market from May to winter.

Veal is in season except in hot weather, when it keeps badly.

Venison from the buck is best from August to November, from the doe from November to January.

Watermelons are in season from July to October.

Woodcock is in season from July to November, but is best in OctoberA cord of wood is 128cubic feet; the sticks are cut four feet long and piled four feet high, and in a pile eight feet long. "Wood cut to stove length, eighteen to twenty inches, is sometimes sold as a cord, when only eight feet long, four feet high, and as wide as the sticks are long, but it is not, of course, really a cord. The fair way to sell fuel, however, would be by weight; and when weights are equal the wood containing the most hydrogen will produce the most heat. Thus, one hundred pounds of dry pine are worth more as fuel than the same number of pounds of dry oak. Wood can never be economically used in a green state, as it then contains about twenty-five per cent water, which must be evaporated, and all the heat required to evaporate this sap is wasted. We give below a table, in which shell-bark hickory is made the standard of comparison, rated at 100 in value and 1000 in weight, and the weights of other varieties show their comparative value, which may be readily estimated in dollars and cents. For instance, if hickory is worth $7.00 per cord, the proper value of white-oak would be $4.86, for as 100:(hick-ory) is to $6.00, so is .81 to the value of white-oak, $4.86.

Woods.

Comparative Weight.

Weight per Cord.

Comp. Value.

Shell-bark Hickory.............................

1000

4469

100

White Walnut.......................................

949

4241

95

White Oak..................... ...........

855

3821

81

White Ash.............................................

722

3450

77

Scrub Oak......................................................

747

3339

73

Red Oak.....................................

728

3255

69

Black Walnut............................................

681

3044

65

White Beech...........................................

724

3236

65

Yellow Oak.............................................

653

2916

60

Sugar Maple..................................................

644

2878

60

White Elm.................................

580

3592

58

Yellow -pine....................................................

551

2463

54

Sycamore.....................................................

535

2391

52

Chestnut....................................................

522

2233

52

Popalr.........................................................

563

2516

52

Pitch-pine.......................................

426

1904

43

White -pine..............................................

418

1868

42

Lombardy Poplar...................................................

397

1774

40

The quantity of combustible matter in fuel, if weight and other conditions are equal, is indicated by the amount of ashes or non-combustible matter remaining. The heating power of fuel is dependent partly on this, but not wholly. Fuel is valuable for various purposes in proportion to the flame it produces. A blaze is of great service when heat is to be applied to a great surface; but where an even or lasting heat is required, a more solid fuel is to be preferred.

The various qualities of bituminous, or soft, and anthracite coals, as sold in different markets, makes it impossible to give any accurate comparison of values. Measured by pounds, if anthracite is made the standard at 250, seasoned oak rauks 125, or one-half in value; hickory, 137; white pine, 137; yellow pine, 145, coke, 285; while the bituminovs coals vary from 188 to 248