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Practical Housekeeping | by Estelle Woods Wilcox



A Careful Compilation Of Tried And Approved Recipes

TitlePractical Housekeeping
AuthorEstelle Woods Wilcox
PublisherBuckeye Publishing Company
Year1887
Copyright1887, Buckeye Publishing Company
AmazonThe New Practical Housekeeping

"Prove all things and hold fast that which is good."

Love In A Cottage

"Love In A Cottage." - "Never Mind; Don't Cry, Pet, I'll Do all the Cooking. "

By permission of Harper Bros., New York.

-Publisher's Notice
This book is a revised and enlarged edition of Buckeye Cookery and Practical Housekeeping, which has reached a sale of over One Hundred Thousand copies since its publication, three years ago. The fi...
-Preface
Fortunately it is becoming fashionable to economize, and housekeepers are really finding it a pleasant pastime to search out and stop wastes in household expenses, and to exercise the thousand little ...
-Bread-Making
The old saying, bread is the staff of life, has sound reason in it. Flour made from wheat, and meal from oats and Indian corn, are rich in the waste-repairing elements, starch and albumen, and head ...
-The Sponge
This is made from warm water or milk, yeast and flour (some add mashed potatoes) mixed together in the proportion of one pint wetting (water or milk) to two pints of sifted flour. If milk is used it s...
-How To Make Good Bread
Always be Up in the morning early, just at the peep of day, in summer time, to prevent the sponge becoming sour by too long standing, and in winter to be getting materials warmed and in readiness f...
-How To Bake Bread
Here is the important point, for the bread may be perfect thus far and then be spoiled in baking. No definite rules can be given that apply equally well to every stove and range; but one general rule ...
-Graham And Corn Bread
It is very desirable that every family should have a constant supply of bread made of unbolted flour, or rye and Indian corn. Most persons find it palatable, and it promotes health. For these coarse b...
-Bread Sponge And Bread
Five pints warm water, five quarts sifted flour, one coffee-cup yeast; mix in a'two-gallon stone jar, cover closely, and set in a large tin pan, so that if the sponge rises over the top of the jar, th...
-Hop-yeast Bread
One tea-cup yeast, three pints warm water; make a thin sponge at tea time, cover and let it remain two hours or until very light. By adding the water to the flour first and having the sponge quite war...
-Bread With Potatoes
To one quart of blood-warm water or milk (if milk is used, it must first be scalded and then cooled to blood heat), take two quarts sifted flour and one teacup fresh potato yeast. Put the milk or wate...
-Bread Raised Once
No other yeast is made with so little trouble as potato yeast. Bread made from it keeps moist longer, and there is no danger of injuring the flavor of the bread by using too much. When plentifully use...
-Bread Raised Three Times
Begin about 5 p. m., plan for six loaves, somewhat larger than bakers' loaves; take two little cakes of yeast, put them into a pint of tepid water, and, when soft, beat in thoroughly enough flour to m...
-Salt-rising Bread
The leaven for this bread is prepared thus: Take a pint of warm water - about 90 - (if a little too hot defeat is certain) in a perfectly clean bowl and stir up a thick batter, adding only a tea-...
-Another Salt-Rising Bread
In summer take at night one (scant) pint of new milk, half as much hot water, a tea-spoon salt, one of sugar, and a very little soda. Mix all in a nice, sweet pitcher (it must be perfectly clean and s...
-Boston Brown Bread
One heaping coffee-cup each of corn, rye and Graham meal. The rye meal should be as fine as the Graham, or rye flour may be used. Sift the three kinds together as closely as possible, and beat togethe...
-Corn Bread
Take one quart buttermilk, and one heaping pint corn meal, one tea-spoon soda, one of salt, one table-spoon sugar and three eggs; have the stove very hot, and do not bake in too deep a pan. The batter...
-Breakfast And Tea Cakes
To make biscuit, take a part of the dough left from bread-making when it is ready to mold into loaves, work in the lard and any other ingredients desired, such as butter, eggs, sugar, spice, etc., als...
-Buttered Toast
Although toast is commonly used, few know how to prepare it nicely. Take bread not too fresh, cut thin and evenly, trim off the crust-edges for the crumb-jar; first warm each side of the bread, then p...
-French Rolls
Peel six medium-sized mealy potatoes, boil in two quarts of water, press and drain both potatoes and water through a colander; when cool enough so as not to scald, add flour to make a thick batter, be...
-Wedding Sandwich Rolls
Late in the evening make a rather stiff potato sponge (see directions under Bread-Making), and in the morning mix in as much flour as will make a soft dough, knead well, and place to rise; when suff...
-Graham Mush
Sift meal slowly into boiling salted water, stirring briskly until it is as thick as can be stirred with one hand; serve with milk or cream and sugar, or butter and syrup. It is much improved by remov...
-Fritters
Make fritters quickly and beat thoroughly. A good rule for them is two eggs, one half-pint milk, one tea-spoon salt, and two cups flour; have the lard in which to cook them nice and sweet and hot. Cla...
-Lemon Fritters
One-fourth pound of eggs, one-half pound flour, one-fourth pound sugar (pulverized); beat the yolks well, add the flour and enough fresh milk to make a stiff batter (about a gill of milk); beat the wh...
-Griddle-Cakes
Griddle-cakes should be well beaten when first made, and are much lighter when the eggs are separated, whipping the yolks to a thick cream, and adding the whites beaten to a stiff froth just before ba...
-Yeast
The best is potato yeast, because bread made with it is moister. and there is no danger of injuring the flavor of the bread by an excess of yeast. Dry yeast should be made in May or June for summer us...
-Yeast Recipes
Dry Yeast Boil two large potatoes and a handful of hops (the latter in a bag) in three pints water; when done, take out potatoes, mash well, add one pint flour, and pour boiling hot water over all; b...
-Potato Yeast
Take as many hops as can be grasped in the hand twice, put one-half gallon water over them in a new coffee-pot kept for that purpose, boil slowly for one hour. Do not tie them in a cloth to boil, as t...
-Yahoo Yeast
Take a table-spoonful and a half of New Orleans molasses, and add to it the same quantity of warm water. Stir in enough flour to make a thin batter; set it in a warm place - not hot - and it will soon...
-Cake-Making
Let all things be done decently and in order, and the first to put in order when you are going to bake is yourself. Secure the hair in a net or other covering, to prevent any from falling, and brush...
-Fruit Cake
Most ladies think fruit cake quite incomplete without wine or brandy, but it can be made equally good on strictly temperance-principles, by substituting one-third of a cup of molasses for a wineglass ...
-The Oven
Too much care can not be given to the preparation of the oven, which is oftener too hot than too cool; however, an oven too cold at first will ruin any cake. Cake should rise and begin to bake before ...
-Eggless Cake
One and a half tea-cups sugar, one of sour milk, three (level) of sifted flour, half cup butter, tea-spoon soda, half tea-spoon cinnamon, half tea-spoon grated nutmeg, tea-cup raisins chopped and well...
-Thanksgiving Fruit Cake
Six pounds flour, three of butter, three and a half of sugar, an ounce mace, two glasses wine, two glasses brandy, four pounds raisins, half pound citron, six eggs, one pint yeast, small tea-spoon sod...
-French Loaf Cake
Five cups sugar, three of butter, two of milk, ten of flour, six eggs, three nutmegs, pound seeded raisins, a grated lemon, small tea-spoon soda, wine-glass wine, one of brandy, or, two-thirds of a cu...
-Layer-Cakes
In baking layer-cakes it is important to thoroughly grease the tins - to make it emphatic, we will say thoroughly grease and then grease again - and after using rub off with a coarse towel, taking car...
-Dixie Cream Puffs
Five eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one and a half cups each of white sugar and sifted flour, two tea-spoons baking powder in the flour; bake in tea-cups, filling about half full. The cream...
-Dominoes
Make Mrs. Jennison's sponge cake, bake in long pie-tins (two such tins will make twelve dominoes, and if no more are required, the rest of the batter may be baked in a loaf). The batter in the pie-t...
-Gold Part
- One cup sugar, three-fourths cup butter, half cup sweet milk, one and a half tea-spoons baking-powder sifted in a little more than one and a half cups flour, yolks of seven eggs thoroughly beaten, a...
-Rolled Jelly Cake
Beat twelve eggs and one pound pulverized sugar together very lightly, then stir in three-fourths pound of flour, making batter as light as for sponge-cake, and thin enough to spread nicely when poure...
-Lady's Fingers
One and one-eighth pound of flour, one of powdered sugar, ten eggs; beat eggs and sugar as light as for sponge-cake; sift in with flour one tea-spoon baking-powder and stir slowly. Make a funnel-shape...
-Directions For Frosting
Beat whites of eggs to a stiff froth, add powdered sugar gradually, beating well all the time. (There are various opinions about the length of time frosting should be beaten, some giving half an hour,...
-Crullers And Doughnuts
To cook these properly the fat should be of the right heat. When hot enough it will cease to bubble and be perfectly still; try with a bit of the batter, and if the heat is right the dough will rise i...
-Raised Doughnuts
Peel and boil four good sized potatoes; mash fine, and pour boiling water over them until of the consistency of gruel; let cool, add a yeast cake, and a little flour; let rise till light, then add one...
-Creams And Custards
For creams and mustards eggs should never be beaten in tin, but always in stone or earthen ware, as there is some chemical influence about tin which prevents their attaining that creamy lightness so d...
-Bohemian Creams
One quart cream, two table-spoons sugar, one ounce gelatine soaked in water until dissolved; whip half the cream (rich milk may be substituted for cream) to a stiff froth; boil the other half with the...
-Blanc-mange
Dissolve three heaping table-spoons corn starch and three of sugar in one pint of milk; add to this three eggs well beaten, and pour the mixture into one pint of boiling milk, stirring constantly unti...
-Virginia Caramel Custard
To make a baked custard, separate the whites and yolks of five eggs, beat the yolks well with a quarter of a pound of sugar, add the well-beaten whites and mix well with a quart of milk. Flavor and th...
-Confectionery
There are very few modern kitchens in which some cooking utensil may not be found convenient for making candy. A sauce-pan of tinned iron, with a handle and flaring sides, and a lip to facilitate the ...
-Baltimore Kisses
Beat the whites of four small eggs to a high, firm froth, stir into it half a pound pulverized sugar, flavor with essence lemon or rose, continue to beat until very light; then drop half the size of a...
-Everton Ice-cream Candy
Squeeze the juice of one large lemon into a cup. Boil ore and one-half pounds moist white sugar, two ounces butter, one and a half tea-cups water, together with half the rind of the lemon, and when do...
-Meringues
One pound granulated sugar, whites of nine eggs. Whip eggs until dish can be inverted without their falling off', and then simply add the sugar, incorporating it thoroughly, but stirring as little as ...
-Canning Fruits
Cleanse the cans thoroughly and test to see if any leak or are cracked. If tin cans leak, send them to the tinner; if discolored inside they may be lined with writing-paper just before using. In buyin...
-Warranted Canned Strawberries
Put four pounds white sugar in a kettle, add a teacup cold water, let boil till perfectly clear, then add four quarts nice berries. Boil ten minutes, keeping them covered with syrup, but avoid stirrin...
-Catsups And Sauces
Always select perfect fruit; cook in porcelain, never in metal. In making catsup, instead of boiling, some sprinkle the tomatoes with salt and let them stand over night, then strain and add spices, et...
-Tomato Catsup
Take one bushel of firm ripe tomatoes - the Feejee Island, known by their pink or purple color, and the Trophy, are the best and richest varieties for catsup and canning. Wipe them off nicely with a...
-Cranberry Sauce
After removing all soft berries, wash thoroughly, place for about two minutes in scalding water, remove, and to every pound fruit add three-quarters of a pound granulated sugar and a half pint water; ...
-Drawn Butter
Rub a small cup of butter into half a table-spoon flour, beating it to a cream, adding, if needed, a little salt; pour on it half a pint boiling water, stirring it fast, and taking care not to let it ...
-Drinks
To avoid adulteration, buy coffee in the grain, either raw or in small quantities freshly roasted. The best kinds are the Mocha and Java, and some prefer to mix the two, having roasted them separately...
-Making Coffee
One for the pot and a heaping table-spoon of ground coffee for each person, is the usual allowance. Mix well, either with a part or the whole of an egg (or codfish skin, washed, dried, and cut in in...
-Filtered Coffee
The French coffee biggin furnishes the easiest means for filtering coffee. It consists of two cylindrical tin vessels, one fitting into the other; the bottom of the upper one is a fine strainer, anoth...
-Making Tea
Polly, put the kettle on, and we '11 all take Tea. Of all cups that cheer, there is nothing like the smoking-hot cup of tea, made with boiling water, in a thoroughly scalded tea-pot. Put into the...
-Coffee With Whipped Cream
For six cups of coffee of fair size, take one cup sweet cream whipped light with a little sugar; put into each cup the desired amount of sugar and about a table-spoon boiling milk; pour the coffee ove...
-Chocolate
Take six table-spoons scraped chocolate, or three of chocolate and three of cocoa, dissolve in a quart of boiling water, boil hard fifteen minutes, add one quart of rich milk, let scald and serve hot;...
-Eggs
The fresher they are the better and more wholesome, though new-laid eggs require to be cooked longer than others. Eggs over a week old will do to fry, but not to boil. In boiling, they are less likely...
-How To Make Omelets
To make an omelet, beat the yolks lightly (twelve beats is said to be the magic number), as too much beating makes them thin and destroys the appearance of the omelet, then add the milk, the salt, pep...
-How To Keep Eggs
Put a two inch layer of salt in bottom of stone jar, then a layer of fresh eggs, small end down; then salt, then eggs, and so on til] jar is full, with a layer of salt at top; cover and put in a cool ...
-Fish
Fish is easier of digestion but less nutritious than meats, if sal mon is excepted, which is extremely hearty food, and should be eaten sparingly by children and those whose digestion is not strong. F...
-Fruits
The arrangement of fresh fruits for the table affords play for the most cultivated taste and not a little real inventive genius. Melons,, oranges, and indeed all kind of fruits, are appropriate breakf...
-Baked Apples
Cut out the blossoms and stems of tart apples, in the stem end out some sugar; bake till soft; serve either warm or cold. Sweet apples require a longer time for baking than sour, and are better for ad...
-Game
Of game birds the woodcock outranks all in delicate tenderness and sweet flavor. The thigh is especially deemed a choice tidbit. The leg is the finest part of the snipe, but generally the breast is th...
-Roast Goose
The goose should not be more than eight months old, and the fatter the more tender and juicy the meat. A green goose (four months old) is the choicest. Kill at least twenty-four hours before cooking...
-Snipe
Snipe are best roasted with a piece of pork tied to the breast, or they may be stuffed and baked. - Mrs. M. R. Salmi of Duck. Save remnants of cold duck or other game, trim meat off neatly, set aside...
-Ices And Ice-Cream
Perfectly fresh sweet cream makes the most delicious ice-cream. A substitute is a preparation of boiled new milk, etc., made late in the evening if for dinner, in the morning if for tea, and placed on...
-Ice-cream
Three pints sweet cream, quart new milk, pint powdered sugar, the whites of two eggs beaten light, table-spoon vanilla; put in 12 freezer till thoroughly chilled through, and then freeze. This is very...
-Washington Fruit Ice-cream
Take two dozen sweet and half a dozen bitter almonds; blanch in scalding water, throw into a bowl of cold water; pound one at a time in a mortar, till they become a smooth paste free from the smallest...
-Jellies And Jams
Jellies were formerly reputed nourishing, digestible, and fit food for sick and delicate persons, but modern investigation places them second to the lean part of animals and birds. When made of gelati...
-Easter Jelly
Color calf's-foot jelly a bright yellow by steeping a small quantity of dried saffron leaves in the water. Pare lemons in long strips about the width of a straw, boil in water until tender, throw them...
-Quince Jelly
Rub the quinces with a cloth until perfectly smooth, cut in small pieces, pack tight in a kettle, pour on cold water until level with the fruit, boil until very soft; make a three-cornered flannel bag...
-Plum Jelly
If plums are wild (not cultivated) put in pan and sprinkle with soda and pour hot water over them, let stand a few moments and stir through them; take out and put on with water just to cover, or less ...
-Jams
In making jams, the fruit should be carefully cleaned and thoroughly bruised, as mashing it before cooking prevents it from becoming hard. Boil fifteen or twenty minutes before adding the sugar, as th...
-Meats
Inattention to the temperature of the water and too early application of salt cause great waste in boiling meats. To make fresh meat rich and nutritious it should be placed in a kettle of boiling wate...
-Fried Beefsteak
When the means to broil are not at hand, the next best method is to heat the frying pan very hot, put in steak previously hacked, let remain a few moments, loosen with a knife and turn quickly several...
-Boiled Corned Beef
Soak over night if very salt, but if beef is young and properly corned this is not necessary; pour over it cold water enough to cover it well, after washing off the salt. The rule for boiling meats is...
-Roast Beef
Take a rib-piece or loin-roast of seven to eight pounds. Beaf it thoroughly all over, lay it in the roasting dish and baste it with melted butter. Put it inside the well-heated oven, and baste frequen...
-Mutton Chops
Season with salt and pepper, put in skillet, cover closely, and fry five minutes, turning over once; dip each chop in beaten egg, then in cracker or bread-crumbs, and fry till tender or nicely browned...
-Boiled Ham
Pour boiling water over it and let stand until cool enough to wash, scrape clean (some have a coarse hair-brush on purpose for cleaning hams), put in a thoroughly cleansed boiler with cold water enoug...
-Spare-rib Pot-pie
Cut the spare-ribs once across and then in strips three or four inches wide, put on in kettle with hot water enough to cover, stew until tender, season with salt and pepper, and turn out of kettle; re...
-Roast Pork
A small loin of pork, three table-spoons bread-crumbs, one onion, half a tea-spoon chopped sage, half tea-spoon salt, half tea-spoon pepper, one ounce chopped suet, one table-spoon drippings. Separate...
-Roast Spare-Rib
Trim off the rough ends neatly, crack the ribs across the middle, rub with salt and sprinkle with pepper, fold over, stuff with turkey-dressing, sew up tightly, place in dripping-pan with pint of wate...
-Fried Veal Cutlets
Make a batter of half pint of milk, a well-beaten egg, and flour-, fry the veal brown in sweet lard or beef-drippings, dip it in the batter and fry again till brown; drop some spoonfuls of batter in t...
-Roast Loin Of Veal
Wash and rub thoroughly with salt and pepper, leaving in the kidney, around which put plenty of salt; roll up, let stand two hours; in the meantime make dressing of bread-crumbs, salt, pepper, and cho...
-Sweet-breads
These are great delicacies. There are two in a calf, one from neck called throat sweet-bread, the other from near the heart called heart sweet-bread. The latter is most delicate. Select the larges...
-Pastry
Butter or lard for pastry should be sweet, fresh and solid. When freshly-made butter can not be had, wash well, kneading while under cold water, changing the water two or three times, and then wiping ...
-Puff Paste
Take three-fourths pound of butter (be sure that it is of the best quality), free it from salt (by working it in water), form it in a square lump, and place it in flour for half an hour to harden; pla...
-Mince-meat
Take five or six pounds scraggy beef - a neck piece will do - and put to boil in water enough to cover it; take oft' the scum that rises when it reaches the boiling point, add hot water from time to t...
-Potato Pie
Boil either Irish or sweet potatoes until well done, mash and rub through a sieve; to a pint of pulp, add three pints sweet milk, table-spoon melted butter, tea-cup sugar, three eggs, pinch of salt, a...
-Bina's Strawberry Shortcake
Two heaping tea-spoons baking powder sifted into one quart flour, scant half tea-cup butter, two table-spoons sugar, a little salt, enough sweet milk (or water) to make a soft dough; roll out almost a...
-Apple Tarts
Pare, quarter, core, and boil in a half tea-cup of water until very soft, ten large tart apples; beat till very smooth, then add the yolks of six eggs or three whole eggs, juice and grated rind of two...
-Puddings And Sauces
No ingredient of doubtful quality should enter into the composition of puddings. Suet must be perfectly sweet, and milk should be fresh and without the least unpleasant flavor. Suet when over kept and...
-Boiled Apple Dumplings
Add to two cups sour milk one tea-spoon soda, and one of salt, half cup of butter, lard, flour enough to make dough a little stiffer than for biscuit; or make a good baking-powder crust; peel and core...
-Corn-starch Pudding
One pint sweet milk, whites of three eggs, two table-spoons cornstarch, three of sugar, and a little salt. Put the milk in a pan or small bucket, set in a kettle of hot water on the stove, and when it...
-Simple Fruit Puddings
Stew currants, or any small fruits, fresh or dried, with sugar to taste, and pour hot over thin slices of baker's bread with crust cut off, making alternate layers of fruit and bread, and leaving a th...
-Minute Pudding
Take sweet milk, or half water and milk, a pinch of salt, let boil, stir in wheat flour, as in making corn-meal mush, until same thickness as mush; remove from fire, and serve at once with sweetened c...
-Christmas Plum Pudding
One quart seeded raisins, pint currants, half pint citron cut up, quart of apples peeled and chopped, a quart of fresh and nicely chopped beef-suet, a quart of sweet milk, a heaping quart of stale bre...
-Quick Puff Pudding
Stir one pint flour, two tea-spoons baking-powder, and a little salt into milk until very soft; place in steamer well-greased cups, put in each a spoonful of batter, then one of berries, steamed apple...
-Rice Pudding
To a cup of rice boiled in a custard-kettle in a pint of water (seasoned well with salt) until dry, add a pint of milk in which a little corn starch has been dissolved, and boil again; add the yolks o...
-Grandma Thomson's White Pudding
Weigh equal quantities of best beef suet and sifted flour, shave down suet and rub into fine particles with the hands, removing all tough and stringy parts, mix well with the flour, season very highly...
-Preserves
Preserves, to be perfect, must be made with the greatest care. Economy of time and trouble is a waste of fruit and sugar. The best are made by putting only a small amount of fruit at a time in the syr...
-Citron Preserves
Pare off rind, seed, cut in thin slices two inches long, weigh, and put in preserving kettle with water enough to cover; boil one hour, take out the melon, and to the water in kettle add as much susra...
-Peach Preserves
Take any fine peaches that do not mash readily in cooking, pare carefully and remove pits; take sugar equal in weight to fruit, (or if to be sealed, three-quarters pound sugar to the pound of fruit), ...
-Watermelon Preserves
Pare off outside green rind, cut in pieces two inches long, weigh, throw into cold water, skim out, add a heaping tea-spoon each of salt and pulverized alum to two gallons of rinds, let stand until sa...
-Orange Marmalade
Twelve pounds sour oranges, twelve pounds crushed sugar; wash the oranges and pare them as you would apples; put the peel in a porcelain-lined kettle with twice its bulk or more of cold water; keep it...
-Pickles
In making pickles use none but the best cider vinegar, and boil in a porcelain kettle - never in metal. A lump of alum size of a small nutmeg, to a gallon of cucumbers, dissolved and added to the vine...
-Bottled Pickles
Wash and wipe a half bushel of medium-sized cucumbers, suitable for pickling, pack close in a stone jar, sprinkle over the top one pint of salt, pour over a sufficient quantity of boiling water to cov...
-Cucumber Pickles
Cover the, bottom of cask with common salt; gather the cucumbers every other day, early in the morning or late in the evening, as it does not injure the vines so much then as in the heat of the day; c...
-Chopped Pickles
Take a peck green tomatoes, wash clean, cut away a small piece from each end, slice and place in a large wooden bowl, chop fine, place in a crock and mix salt with them (half pint to a peck), let stan...
-Variety Pickles
One peck each of green tomatoes and cucumbers, and one quart onions; pare, slice and salt (using a rounded half pint for all) each in separate jars, letting them stand in the salt twenty-four hours, a...
-Virginia Mixed Pickle
One-half peck green tomatoes, twenty-five medium-sized cucum bers, fifteen large white onions, one-half peck small onions, four heads cabbages, one pint grated horse-radish, one-half pound white musta...
-Pickled Walnuts
Gather walnuts (or butternuts) when soft enough to be pierced by a needle (July), prick each with a large needle well through, holding in a cloth to avoid staining the hands, cover with strong salt wa...
-Peach Pickles
Pare freestone peaches, place in a stone jar, and pour over them boiling-hot syrup made in the proportion of one quart best cider vinegar to three pints sugar; boil and skim, and pour over the fruit b...
-Watermelon Pickle
Pare off very carefully the green part of the rind of a good, ripe watermelon, trim off the red core, cut in pieces one or two inches in length, place in a porcelain-lined kettle, in the proportion of...
-Poultry
Do not feed poultry for twenty-four hours before killing; catch them without frightening or bruising, tie the feet together, hang up on a horizontal pole, tie the wings together over the back with a s...
-How To Cut Up A Chicken
Pick, singe, and draw; lay the chicken on a board kept for the purpose, cut off the feet at first joint; cut a slit in the neck, take 18 out the windpipe and crop, cut off the wings and legs at the jo...
-Chicken Pot-pie
Cut up a chicken and put on in hot water enough to cover, and take care that it does not cook dry; while boiling cut off a slice from bread dough, add a small lump of lard, and mix up like light biscu...
-Chicken Pie
Cut up two young chickens, place in hot water enough to cover, (as it boils away add more so as to have enough for the pie and for gravy to serve with it), boil until tender; line the sides of a four ...
-Fricasseed Chicken
Cut up and put on to boil, skin side down, in a small quantity of water, season with salt, pepper, and slices of an onion if liked; stew gently until tender, remove chicken, add a half pint cream or m...
-Boned Turkey
With a sharp knife slit the skin down the back, and raising one side at a time with the fingers, separate the flesh from the bones with knife, until the wings and legs are reached. These unjoint from ...
-Roast Turkey
After picking and singeing the turkey, plump it by plunging -quickly three times into boiling water and then three times into cold, holding it by the legs; place to drain and dress as in general direc...
-Roast Turkey With Oyster Dressing
Dress and rub turkey thoroughly inside and out with salt and pepper, steam two hours or until it begins to grow tender, lifting the cover occasionally and sprinkling lightly with salt. Then take out, ...
-Salads
Vegetables used for salads are: boiled asparagus, cabbage, red and white; lettuce, chicory, boiled cauliflower, celery, dandelion, purslane, water-cress, etc. Prepare carefully by freshening in cool w...
-Mayonnaise Dressing
meat a raw egg (some use the yolks only) with a salt-spoon of salt (using a wooden-spoon) until it is thoroughly smooth, add a tea-spoon mixed mustard made rather thicker than usual; when quite smooth...
-Shell-Fish
There is not a lover of oysters in existence who does not heartily sympathize with the boy who wanted to spell August O-r-g-u-s-t, in order to bring it into the list of the months which contain an ...
-Clam Chowder
Chop fifty clams, peel and slice ten raw potatoes, cut into dice six onions and a half pound fat salt pork, slice six tomatoes (if canned use a coffee-cup full), add a pound pilot crackers; first put ...
-Deviled Oysters
Wipe the oysters dry and lay in a flat dish, cover with a mixture of melted butter, cayenne pepper (or pepper sauce), and lemon juice. Let them lie in this for ten minutes, turning them frequently; ta...
-Fried Oysters
Drain carefully, remove all bits of shell, and sprinkle with pepper and salt, and set in a cool place for ten or fifteen minutes. Then, If oysters are small, pour them into a pan of crackers rolled fi...
-Oyster Pie
Line a deep pie-dish with puff-paste; dredge with flour, pour in one pint oysters, season well with bits of butter, salt and pepper, and sprinkle flour over; pour on some of the oyster-liquor, and cov...
-Raw Oysters
Wash the shells, open, detaching the flat shell, loosen from the deep shell, but leave them in it, and serve half dozen on a plate, with a quarter of lemon in center. Eat with salt, pepper and lemon j...
-Soups
To make nutritious, healthful and palatable soup, with flavors properly commingled, is an art which requires study and practice, but it is surprising from what a scant allotment of material a delicate...
-Clam Soup
First catch your clams - along the ebbing edges Of saline coves you'll find the precious wedges, With backs up, lurking in the, sandy bottom; Pull in your iron rake, and lo ! you ' ve got 'em! Tak...
-Beef Soup
Take the cracked joints of beef, and after putting the meat in the pot and covering it well with water, let it come to a boil, when it should be well skimmed. Set the pot where the meat will simmer sl...
-Celery Cream Soup
Boil a small cup rice in three pints milk, until it will pass through a sieve. Grate the white part of two heads of celery (three if email) on a bread-grater; add this to the rice milk after it has be...
-Mock Turtle Or Calf's-Head Soup
Lay one large calf s head well cleaned and washed, and four pig's feet, in bottom of a large pot, and cover with a gallon of water; boil three hours, or until flesh will slip from bones; take out head...
-Turkey-bone Soup
After a roasted turkey has been served a portion of the meat still adheres to the bones, especially about the neck; drumsticks are left, or parts of the wings, and pieces rarely called for at table....
-Soup Stock
To four pounds of lean beef (the inferior parts are quite as good for this purpose) put four quarts of cold water (soft is best), wash the meat and put it in the water without salt; let it come slowly...
-Another Way
When stock is drawn off, season with celery salt. A little vermicelli boiled in it for fifteen minutes will give it more body - or some of the fancy letters, stars, triangles, etc., that are made part...
-Vegetables
All vegetables are better cooked in soft water, provided it is clean and pure; if hard water is used, put in a small pinch of soda. The water should be freshly drawn, and should only be put over fire ...
-Asparagus
Wash clean; cat off the white part except a mere end, put into slightly salted boiling water, boil five minutes, pour off water, odd more boiling hot; boil ten to fifteen minutes, then put in a lump o...
-Ambushed Asparagus
Cut off the tender tops of fifty heads of asparagus; boil and drain them. Have ready as many stale biscuits or rolls as there are persons to be served, from which you have cut a neat top slice end sco...
-Boiled Dinner
Put meat on, after washing well, in enough boiling water to just cover the meat; as soon, as it boils, set kettle on the stove where it will simmer or boil very slowly; boil until almost tender, put i...
-Beets
Remove leaves, wash clean, being careful not to break off the little fibers and rootlets, as the juices would thereby escape and they would lose 'their color; boil in plenty of water, if young, two ho...
-Boiled Cauliflower
To each half gallon water allow heaped table-spoon salt; choose close and white cauliflower, trim off decayed outside leaves, and cut stock off flat at bottom; open flower a little in places to remove...
-Dandelions
They are fit for use until they blossom. Cut off the leaves, pick over carefully, wash in several waters, put into boiling water, boil one hour, drain well, add salted boiling water, and boil two hour...
-Baked Onions
The large Spanish or Bermuda onions are best for this purpose. Wash the outside clean, put into a sauce-pan with slightly salted water, and boil an hour, replenishing the water with more (boiling hot)...
-Breakfast Potatoes
Peel, cut in very thin slices into a very little boiling water, so little that it will be evaporated when they are cooked, add salt to taste, some cream, or a very little milk and a bit of butter. A l...
-Potatoes In Kentucky Style
Slice thin as for frying, let remain in cold water half an hour; put into pudding-dish or dripping-pan, with salt, pepper, and some milk - about half a pint to an ordinary dish; put into oven and bake...
-Pease Stewed In Cream
Put two or three pints of young green pease into a sauce-pan of boiling water; when nearly done and tender, drain in a colander, quite dry, melt two ounces of butter in a clean stew-pan, thicken evenl...
-Southern Rice
After thoroughly washing and rubbing the rice, put it in salted water enough to cover it twice over, in a custard-kettle, or tin pail set in a kettle of boiling water; cover the whole closely for fift...
-Ornamental Icing
By Prof. C. H. King Ornamental icing consists in working two or more colors of icing on one surface, - such, for instance, as pink and white, or chocolate and white, sometimes with, sometimes without...
-Artistic Piping, With Diagrams
For the benefit of those who wish to excel in the art of ornamenting bride or other cakes with icing (technically called piping,) I give a sheet of diagrams, which will almost explain themselves, an...
-Artistic Piping, With Diagrams. Continued
To practice this, I would recommend that you procure a walnut board, about twelve inches square, perfectly smooth. This being dark and the sugar white you can easily see the work; and if every thing i...
-Meringue Icing
Beat the whites of six eggs to a very stiff froth (you can not beat them too stiff; and if they are not stiff the meringue will not be good.) While beating, add a saltspoonful of salt, also a teaspoon...
-Chocolate Icing
Ask any confectioner for a piece of Baker's eagle cocoa; and if you can not procure that, ask any grocer for pure cocoa in block, or what is called Baker's premium cocoa. Place what you need of it...
-How To Ice Or Frost A Wedding Or Any Flat Top Cake
When the cake is baked and cold, cut off all the rough parts and brush off all crumbs; then prepare an icing *in the manner described, but in this case for first icing use ordinary powdered sugar; g...
-How To Prepare Icing For Bride Or Other Cakes
Procure a clean china bowl with a round (not square) bottom inside; break into it the whites of three eggs, add about half a pound of the finest powdered sugar obtainable (ask a confectioner for icing...
-Explanation Of Designs For Bride Or Other Cakes
A reference to the design for bride cake top No. 1 (page 359) will show that it is a combination of the scrolls, etc., given in the diagrams for artistic piping, and is not given as a design or a work...
-Dessert Cake
A dessert cake (proper) consists of either a pound or sponge cake mixture baked in a high mold; if you have no other use, an ice cream mold as represented in the sketch. Well clean and fully dry your ...
-Dessert Russe
This may be made of either sponge or pound-cake mixture, and baked in a fancy mold, If the prescribed mold is not available, an ordinary two quart ice-cream mold would answer the purpose pretty well. ...
-The Chantilly Custard
The plates from 1 to 4, inclusive, show the manner of making the Gatian for the custard, which is thus described: First, procure a mold for sponge-cake or jelly, about one quart or three pints size, w...
-Raised Pie
We here present an original design, composed of five distinct plates, arranged and numbered for practical use. The illustration (page 367) represents a raised pie. It may be filled to suit the taste w...
-How To Ornament A Jelly Cake
Trim off the edge of the jelly cake, then give it a thin coating of water icing (see water icing); next have a cone of white icing ready. To the more fully illustrate this, I will request you to follo...
-Pastry Recipes
Under the head of pastry is embraced crusts or covering for meat pies. Pastry made from butter, and in the same manner as for fruit pies, patties, etc., is too light, brittle and gross for meat pies; ...
-How To Use Suet
Allow three quarters of a pound of beef suet for every pound of flour; in this case adding a little salt to the water you mix the flour with. First take the suet, divest it of all loose skin and blood...
-Short Paste
Take one pound sifted flour, place it in a bowl, add to it half a pound good butter. Break the butter up very fine in the flour, adding a little salt (according to the saltness of the butter); now add...
-Open Tarts
Take the puff paste, after it has received its last rolling, roll out evenly in a sheet one-fourth of an inch in thickness (you need not roll out the whole of the paste, but cut off a piece sufficient...
-Oyster Pate (A La Pyramid)
Take a piece of short paste, or scraps of puff paste, roll it out one-fourth of an inch thick, and cut out the number of pieces you require with the same cutter as for open tarts, place them in baking...
-Deep Fruit Pies
Fruit pies in deep dishes, such as made by the English and French, are preferable to ordinary fruit pie, because you obtain more juice and fruit. The best method of making these is as follows: Take a ...
-Raspberry Sandwiches
Take a piece of puff paste, after it is fully rolled and folded, then roll it out, one-fourth inch in thickness and fold it over evenly (like a sheet of paper). Now roll this out to an eighth of an in...
-Gutter Tarts
Take small patty pans, line them out with short crust and then fill them with red currants, black currants, raspberries or what fruit you choose; heap them up high in the center, add a little powdered...
-Fonchonetts
Proceed as for creaprecies. When baked place an almond macaroon (procurable at any bakers or grocers if you have none in store) in each, cover the macaroon with half quince and half red currant jell...
-Beef Steak Pie
First prepare seasoning of three parts salt and one part black pepper, with just a dash of ground nutmeg; next take tender steak, enough to fill the dish, cut this up into thin slices, now take each s...
-The Eclipse Ornamenter
Those who wish to practice the art taught in Prof. King's lessons, will find the invention, represented in the accompanying cut, a great convenience and saving of time, trouble and sugar. It seems to ...
-A Year's Bill Of Fare
The following arrangement of Bills of Fare for every day in the year has been made with especial reference to convenience, economy, and adaptation to the wants of ladies who are so fortunate as to be ...
-Bill Of Fare For January
1. Breakfast - Waffles, broiled steak, fried apples. Dinner - Roast duck, apple sauce, a brown stew, mashed turnips, sweet potatoes baked, celery; prairie plum pudding with sauce, fruit cake, oranges....
-Bill Of Fare For February
1. Sunday. Breakfast - Hot rolls, broiled sirloin steak, Saratoga potatoes. Dinner - Chicken pie with oysters, roast potatoes, salsify, dried Lima beans, lobster salad, currant jelly; orange pudding, ...
-Bill Of Fare For March
1. Breakfast - Cream toast, chicken croquettes, boiled eggs. Dinner - Beefsteak pudding, stewed salsify, baked potatoes, lobster salad, tilery; one-two-three-four pudding, jelly cake, nuts, raisins. S...
-Bill Of Fare For April
1. Breakfast - Long breakfast rolls, broiled porter-house steaks, hominy croquettes. Dinner - Chicken soup, chicken dressed with egg sauce, whole potatoes, spinach, young lettuce and onions, sweet pic...
-Bill Of Fare For May
1. Breakfast - Buttered toast, served with fricassee of cold boiled or canned fish, boiled eggs. Dinner - Bacon boiled with spring greens, potatoes, beets, parsnips; plain boiled rice with cream sauce...
-Bill Of Fare For June
1. Breakfast - Buttered toast, poached eggs, mutton chops. Dinner - Boast beef, whole potatoes, ambushed asparagus, tomato salad; strawberries and cream, cake. Supper - Light biscuit, cold beef sliced...
-Bill Of Fare For July
1. Breakfast - Warm biscuit, hominy croquettes, broiled ham, sliced to matoes. Dinner - Beef's tongue with green peas, potatoes a la Parisien, sliced cucumbers; raspberry float, cake. Supper - Sliced ...
-Bill Of Fare For August
1. Sunday. Breakfast - Nutmeg melon, broiled mackerel, potatoes whole, buttered toast, flannel cakes with syrup. Dinner - Chicken soup, roast tenderloin of beef, new potatoes, boiled corn in the ear; ...
-Bill Of Fare For September
1. Breakfast - Milk toast, broiled steak, fried potatoes. Dinner - Chicken pie, boiled potatoes, young carrots, green corn; peach short cake. Supper - Biscuit, sliced tomatoes, grapes. 2. Breakfast -...
-Bill Of Fare For October
1. Breakfast - Broiled steak, flannel cakes, fried potatoes. Dinner - Baked or boiled fish, potatoes boiled, fried egg plant; peach pie, cake. Supper - Dried beef frizzled, light biscuit, stewed quinc...
-Bill Of Fare For November
1. Breakfast - Biscuit, croquettes of veal, breakfast hominy. Dinner - Veal stew, turnips, beets; baked apples with cream, cake. Supper - Cold biscuit, bread and milk, fried apples. 2. Breakfast - Gr...
-Bill Of Fare For December
1. Breakfast - Corn batter cakes, devilled oysters, fried potatoes. Dinner - Chicken pie with oysters, canned Lima beans, cabbage salad; pumpkin pie. cake, Supper - Hot tea rolls, bologna sausage, can...
-For The Picnic
In the Sunny South, picnics are in order as early as April, but in the more northern latitudes should never be attempted before the latter part of May or June, and September and October are the crow...
-Fragments
Mother's hash does n't taste of soap grease, rancid butter, spoiled cheese, raw flour, boarding-house skillets, hotel coffee, garden garlics, bologna sausage, or cayenne pepper; neither is it stewed a...
-How To Regulate Time In Cookery
Mutton - A leg of eight pounds will require two hours and a half; a chine or saddle of ten or eleven pounds, two hours and and a half; a shoulder of seven pounds, one hour and a half; a loin of seven ...
-Aspic Jelly
- To three pints of clear stock (that made from knuckle of veal is good) add two ounces of gelatine that has been softened in cold water. Beat up the whites and shells of two eggs and one yolk; add th...
-Scpapple
- It is composed of the head-meat, trimmings of the hams and shoulders, flitch, smaller parts of the chine, the heart, part of the liver and the skin off the parts intended for lard and sausage. The s...
-Curd Or Cottage Cheese
Set a gallon or more of clabbered milk on the stove hearth or in the oven after cooking a meal, leaving the door open; turn it around frequently, and cut the curd in squares with a knife, stirring gen...
-Meat Pie
Put a layer of cold roast beef or other bits of meat, chopped very fine, in bottom of dish, and season with pepper and salt, then a layer of powdered crackers, with bits of butter and a little milk, a...
-Meat Pie. Continued
By the way, she has just taken up a paper from which she reads this item by Prof. Blot: Wasting is carried on so far and so extensively in American kitchens that it will soon be one of the common sci...
-Table Of Weights And Measures
1 quart sifted flour (well heaped) weighs 1 lb. 3 coffee-cups sifted flour (level) weigh 1 lb. 4 tea-cups sifted flour (level) weigh 1 lb. 1 quart unsifted flour weighs 1 lb. 1 oz. 1 quart sifted I...
-When Food Is In Season
Apples are in season all the year; cheapest from August until spring. Artichokes (Jerusalem) are ready for use in September. Asparagus from the first of May until middle of June. Bass, of which the...
-Housekeeping
Housekeeping, whatever may be the opinion of the butterflies of the period, is an accomplishment in comparison to which, in its bearing on woman's relation to real life and to the family, all others a...
-Sweeping And Dusting
The sweeping and dusting of a room seems simple enough, but is best done systematically. Dusters, made of old prints, with which to cover books, statuettes, and such articles as are difficult to dus...
-The Sitting-Room
The sitting-room should be the pleasantest, because most used, of all in the house. Do not put down a Brussels carpet here, because it is too hard to sweep and holds too much dust. To prevent moths un...
-The Bed-Room
The family bed-room should be on the first floor if possible, if the house is properly built and there is no dampness. Matting is better for the floor than carpet, because freer from dust, and this is...
-The Guest-Chamber
The bed of the guest-chamber, as well as in all sleeping-rooms, should stand so that when one opens the eyes in the morning the light from the window will not be directly upon them, as it is trying to...
-House-Cleaning
When mother earth summons the stirring winds to help clear away the dead leaves and winter litter for the coming grass and flowers, every housekeeper has a feeling of sympathy, and begins to talk of h...
-House-Cleaning. Part 2
Take down all pictures, ornaments, etc.; clean them and put them away in the closets. Clothes, carpeting, and trumpery stowed away, must be thoroughly dusted and aired in sunshine and wind. Take up ...
-House-Cleaning. Part 3
Paint can be taken off where not wanted, with turpentine. Apply with a sponge, after a little time it will rub off; if cloth, rub between the hands and it will crumble off. White spots can be taken of...
-Protection Against Moths
During the week before the siege of house-cleaning in spring of fall, look over all garments and articles to be put away, mend, remove all grease spots if possible. An effective mode for cleansing i...
-Painting
If painting has been required, a patient endurance of a sufficient number of drying days must be given over to this process. The smell of the turpentine will be very much diminished, and the unwholeso...
-Papering
In papering a hard-finished wall, a thin solution of white glue should be first applied with a white-wash brush. To make the paste, sift the flour, add one ounce pulverized alum to every pound of flou...
-General Suggestions
On Monday, wash: Tuesday, iron: Wednesday, bake and scrub kitchen and pantry: Thursday, clean the silver-ware, examine the pots and kettles, and look after store-room and cellar: Friday, devote to ge...
-How To Clean Smoke Off Marble
Wet a piece of flannel in strong ammonia and rub the marble quickly with it, and then wash off with hot soap-suds; or, make a paste of chloride of lime and water and brush over the whole surface that ...
-How To Clean A Papered Wall
Cut into eight pieces a large loaf of bread two days old, blow dust off wall with a bellows, rub down with a piece of the bread, in half yard strokes, beginning at the top of the room, until upper par...
-How To Exterminate Bedbugs
In March scald with boiling water every crack or suspected place where they find refuge, and then touch thoroughly every crack and seam where the bugs are likely to harbor, with kerosene. Great care m...
-Farmer's Door Mat
- Every doorstep should be provided with a foot-scraper and a brush or broom, and every one, as he comes in, should take the time to use them before appearing on the carpet or clean floor. If a regula...
-Moving
- When about to move to another house, begin packing two weeks beforehand. Carefully pack small and fragile articles in boxes and barrels. In this way, china and glassware, and fragile ornaments may b...
-Labor-Saving Contrivances
Every good housewife has neatly arranged cupboard and dish-closet. Every thing has its appropriate shelf and division. But there are other things for which provision should be made. A pile of books is...
-Housekeeper's Alphabet
Apples - Keep in dry place, as cool as possible without freezing. Brooms - Hang in the cellar-way to keep soft and pliant. Cranberries - Keep under water, in cellar; change water monthly. Dish of h...
-The Dining-Room
It may not be amiss to give a page or two to the observances of formal dinners in society, lest some reader - who may hope, if she becomes the rare housekeeper we expect, to be called to give such d...
-The Host And Hostess
Those who entertain should remember it is vulgar hospitality, exceedingly annoying to guests, to overload plates, or to insist on a second supply. If the guest wants more, he knows that it is a delica...
-Individual Manners
Manners, at table and elsewhere, are made for the convenience and comfort of men, and all social observances have now, or have had at some time, a good reason and sound common sense behind them. It mu...
-Breakfast Parties
Breakfast parties are becoming fashionable in cities, because less formal and expensive than dinners, and quite as agreeable to guests. The courses, which are usually fewer in number, are served preci...
-Clearing The Table
Gather up the fragments that nothing be lost or wasted. When each meal is over, if you do not have a crumb-cloth under the table, which, when the chairs are removed, can be lifted carefully at the edg...
-How To Give A Dinner
An oval table, as given in diagram, appears to be the most sociable; and, although it is against all precedent, the host and hostess should sit at the two sides of the table instead of the two ends, a...
-Instructions To Waiters
1. In the demi-Russe' dinner here given, the joints or dishes are to be carved before placing before the person serving them. 2. The person serving fills plates according to the preference of each g...
-Summer Breakfast For Ten (Two Reserved Plates.)
First Course, Melon - When Table Is Laid (See Diagram) Guests Enter And Take Seats Waiters place tea and coffee urns and bring melon. The gentleman serving asks each guest if he will be helped to mel...
-Instructions To Waiters at Summer Breakfast
First, air breakfast room well. See that everything has been dusted. Next lay cloth - white is the fashion now - and see that it is free from wrinkles and creases. See that all articles for table are ...
-What Are Proper Dishes For Each Course
1. Five small raw oysters (on the deep shell, so as to retain the liquor) just before dinner, and put at each plate before the dining room is opened. A colored doiley may be put under them on each pla...
-General Hints
Never let two kinds of animal food or two kinds of pastry be eaten from the same plate; make a fresh course of each. Cards on plates, bearing the names of the company, so as to seat them with referen...
-Entrees And Entremets
Usually, outside of France, entrees are side or corner dishes. Owing to the high seasoning they are also called relishes. They are usually composed of highly seasoned meats, game, etc., etc. Entreme...
-The Kitchen
It is almost impossible to give any directions except in a general way regarding the kitchen, as there is an endless variety of plans and arrangement. In no other room in the house are sunlight and fr...
-The Kitchen. Part 2
if you use oil, buy the best kerosene. To test it, place a small quantity in a tea-cup, and if it does not easily ignite when brought into contact with a lighted taper or match, it is good; poor oil w...
-The Kitchen. Part 3
Where there is a large amount of cooking to be done, the ashes should be cleared from under the slides of the ovens as often as twice a week in large or small families; this will insure the oven to ba...
-The Kitchen. Part 4
The breakage of dishes in some houses is fearful. There are very few families rich enough to bear it, much less the families of small means or just a competence. The mother is sick or wearied with the...
-Vienna Lime
- Vienna lime and alcohol give a beautiful polish to iron or steel. Select the soft pieces of lime, such as will be easily crushed by the thumb and finger, as they are the most free from gritty partic...
-Washing Dishes
- In washing dishes, in addition to directions given in Dining Room, care must be taken not to put tumblers which have had milk in them into hot water, as it drives the milk into the glass, whence i...
-Beans For Winter
String fresh green beans, and cut down the sides till within an inch of the end, boil in water fifteen minutes, take out and drain; when cold, pack in a stone jar, first putting two table-spoons of sa...
-Soldering Liquid
- In soldering tin-ware, especially in mending old ware, the use of soldering liquids will greatly help. There are several of these. The best is made as follows: Get any convenient vial about half ful...
-Horsford Biscuit
- One quart flour, pint sweet milk, half tea-cup lard, heaping salt-spoon salt. Measure each of Horsford's Preparation, mixed in flour, and sifted twice through a sieve. Divide the flour in halves, ad...
-Drying Corn
- Select good ears of sweet corn, husk, take off silk carefully, but do not wash; shave with a sharp knife, not too close to the cob, into a large tin pan or wooden bowl, scrape cob to get all the mil...
-How To Kindle A Coal Fire
Hard coal will not ignite until it is thoroughly heated through and through, and as small coal will not require as much wood to heat it up as large, it is important, where the supply of kindling wood ...
-Sauer Kraut
- Slice cabbage fine on a slaw-cutter; line the bottom and sides of an oaken barrel or keg with cabbage leaves, put in a layer of the sliced cabbage about six inches in depth, sprinkle lightly with sa...
-Hulled Corn
- This old-fashioned luxury is really a delicious dish when properly prepared. Take a six-quart pail full of ashes (hard wood ashes, if possible, as they are stronger); put them into an iron kettle wi...
-Water
- Pure water is as necessary to health as pure air. Rain-water, filtered to remove any foreign matters caught from the roof or in the smoky atmosphere, is the purest attainable. It is a debatable ques...
-How To Use Coal Economically
The Scientific American says: There is a great want of intelligence regarding the burning of coal, and it is not to be expected that servants should know how to save it. The grate or range is stuffe...
-Tin Ware
One boiler for clothes, holding six gallons, with copper bottom or all copper. One milk strainer. One bread-pan, holding five or six quarts. One deep pan, for preserving and canning fruits. One six-qu...
-Cake Board And Rolling Pin
- It is safe to be suspicious of any contrivance that promises too much. There is such a thing as making one implement serve too many purposes; but there seems to be no good reason why a cake board an...
-Dish Warmer
- The engraving represents a dish-warmer made of wire with feet so arranged that it may be set on a stove. Nothing spoils a good breakfast or dinner so effectually as cold plates, but when placed in t...
-Bosom Board
- A board twenty inches long, and ten to twelve inches wide. The shirt is slipped over it and buttoned at the neck; at the other end of the board is a strip about an inch wide, fastened to the board b...
-The Dover Broiler
A good deal of ingenuity has been exhausted in various inventions for broiling meat easily and quickly, and leaving housewives no excuse for using the dyspepsia-producing, old-fashioned frying pan, an...
-The White Mountain Freezer
This freezer is the best in the market, and will give satisfaction to every purchaser. It has three motions. The center beater shaft has lifter arms, or floats, which mix the cream in the middle, turn...
-Large Grater
-A large grater is a necessity in every kitchen. It is used for grating horse-radish, cheese, oranges, lemons, etc., and a hundred other purposes which bring it into frequent use. It is not costly and...
-Spice Box
The spice box serves the same purpose as the rack and cabinet, but is closer than either and equally convenient. It has a handle on the top and a clasp which fastens the lid in place. For keeping spic...
-Strainer Stand
- This is simply a frame made to sustain the strainer while draining. The cords are fastened to the ring that forms the top of strainer sack, and then to the posts of the stand. The strainer should be...
-A Safe And Register
It sometimes happens that houses are so planned that a stove-pipe passes through the floor to the room in second story before passing into the chimney, a drum being used for heating the up-stairs room...
-A Convenient Ash Box
This can be made of cheap lumber, and of a size that the lumber at hand will cut without waste; seven feet in length by three feet in width, and four feet high, may answer in most circumstances. A lid...
-The Management Of Help
In all families whose style of living demands help in the household duties, the management of servants is the great American puzzle. Girls come and go like the seasons, sometimes with the weeks. The...
-Hints To The Employed
Be neat in person and dress. Keep your hands clean and hair tidy. Do not waste time in gadding about and gossip. Be quiet, polite and respectful in your manners. Tell the truth always, but especia...
-Hints About Marketing
Very few housekeepers understand how to select meats wisely or how to buy economically. Most trust the butcher, or buy at hap-hazard, with no clear understanding of what they want, and no consideratio...
-How to Buy Beef
Buying Beef, select that which is of a clear cherry-red color after a fresh cut has been for a few moments exposed to the air. The fat should be of a light straw color, and the meat marbled throughout...
-How to Buy Veal
Veal is best from calves not less than four nor more than six weeks old. If younger it is unfit for food, and if older the mother cow does not furnish enough food, and it is apt to fall away; besides,...
-How to Buy Mutton
Mutton should be fat, and the fat clear, hard and white. Beware of buying mutton with flabby, lean and yellow fat. An abundance of fat is a source of waste, but as the lean part of fat mutton is much ...
-How to Buy Pork
- Great care must be taken in selecting pork. If ill-fed or diseased, no meat is more injurious to the health. The lean must be fine-grained, and both fat and lean very white. The rind should be smoot...
-How to Buy Game And Poultry
To preserve game and poultry in summer, draw as soon as possible after they are killed, wash in several waters, have in readiness a kettle of boiling water, plunge them in, drawing them tip and down b...
-How to Buy Game
- In pheasants and quails, yellow legs and dark bills are signs of a young bird. They are in season in autumn. Pigeons should be fresh, fat and tender, and the feet pliant and smooth. In prairie-chick...
-How to Buy Fish
When fresh, the eyes of fish are full and bright, and the gills a fine clear red, the body stiff and the smell not unpleasant. Mackerel must be lately caught, or it is very indifferent fish, and the ...
-How to Buy Vegetables
All vegetables snap crisply when fresh; if they bend and present a wilted appearance, they are stale. If wilted, they can be partly restored by being sprinkled with water, and laid in a cool, dark pla...
-How to Buy Berries
- Morning is the best time to eat fruit, and fresh fruit is then in . the best condition to be eaten. When berries of any kind can be got fresh with the morning dew, fill the finest glass dish, adding...
-How to Buy Macaroni
- Good macaroni is of a yellowish color, does not break in cooking and yields four times its bulk. Cheese, which feels soft between the fingers, is richest and best, and should be kept in a box in a ...
-How to Buy Eggs
- To determine the exact age of eggs, dissolve about four ounces of common salt in a quart of pure water and then immerse the egg. If it be only a day or so old, it will sink to the bottom of the vess...
-How to Buy Sugars
- Buy sugars for various purposes as follows: For baked custard, mince pie, squash pie, fruit cake, gingerbread, most Indian puddings, use brown sugar. For all light-colored cakes, icing, floating i...
-How to Buy Dressing Poultry For Market
- Secure plump, well fattened fowls. Do not feed for at least 24 hours before killing. Open the veins of the neck and bleed freely - this is the best mode of killing. Scald enough to make the feathers...
-Meat Carving
It is no trifling accomplishment to carve well, and both ladies and gentlemen ought to so far make carving a study that they may be able to perform the task with sufficient skill at least to prevent r...
-Haunch Of Venison
A haunch of venison should be cut across to the bone on the line 1-3-2, then turn the dish a little, and put the point of the knife at 3, and cut down as deep as possible in the direction of 6-4, and ...
-How To Cut And Cure Meats
It is often economical for a family to buy beef by the quarter, and smaller animals whole, especially when wanted for winter use, and every housekeeper ought to know how to cut up meats and to underst...
-Trying Lard
- Cut the fat into small pieces, put into kettle, and pour in enough water to cover the bottom; boil gently until the scraps settle, or until the water has all evaporated, stirring often to prevent ...
-How To Cut Up Pork
Split through the spine, cut off each half of head behind the ear, remove the pieces in front of the shoulder, for sausage. Take out leaf which lies around kindeys, for lard; cut out the lean meat, ri...
-The Despard Red Round
A round of beef weighing twenty-five pounds, one ounce of cloves, three ounces of saltpetre, three ounces of coarse sugar, half an ounce of allspice, six ounces of common salt, one nutmeg. The beef sh...
-How To Clean Beef Tripe
Empty the paunch, rinse it thoroughly in cold water, being careful not to let any of the contents get on the outside. Make strong cleansed water or white lye, let it heat a little, too warm to hold th...
-How To Cure Hams And Bacon
When killed and cool cut up, and begin immediately to salt them. Rub the outside of each ham with a teaspoon of powdered saltpetre, and the inside with a teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Having mixed toget...
-Brine For Beef, Hams And Shoulders
To one hundred pounds beef, take eight pounds salt, five of sugar or five pints molasses (Orleans best, but any good will do), two ounces soda, one ounce saltpeter, four gallons soft water, or enough ...
-Hints On Butter-Making
No sloven can make good butter. The one thing to be kept in mind, morning, noon, and night, is neatness, neatness, neatness. The milking should be done in the cleanest place that can be found, and the...
-The Laundry
When inviting friends to visits of a week or more, try to fix the time for the visit to begin the day after the ironing is done. The girl feels a weight off her mind, has time to cook the meals better...
-The Laundry. Continued
If a machine is used in washing, it is better to soak the clothes over night in warm soft water, soaping collars and wristbands, and pieces most soiled. Have separate tubs for coarse and fine clothes....
-How To Clean Silk And Woolen Dress Goods
Any silk or wooled goods may be washed in gasoline, rubbing as if in water, without injury. The dirt is quickly and easily removed, but no change takes place in the color of the fabric. Great care mus...
-A Washing Fluid
The washing fluid made by the following rule is invaluable in cleaning woolen goods, in washing woolen tidies, or worsted goods of any kind: One-half bar of Babbitt's or Bell's soap, one ounce saltpet...
-Gall Soap
- For washing woolens, silks, or fine prints liable to fade: One pint beef's gall, two pounds common bar soap cut fine, one quart boiling soft water; boil slowly, stirring occasionally until well mixe...
-How To Make Fine Starch
Wet the starch smooth in a little cold water, in a large tin pan, pour on a quart boiling water to two or three table-spoons starch, stirring rapidly all the while; place on stove, stir until it boils...
-Washing Lace
- To make the starch properly, mix the dry particles with enough cold water to make a smooth paste, add cold water until it looks like milk and water, and boil it in a smoothly glazed earthen vessel u...
-How To Remove Grease From Silk, Cotton, Linen Or Worsted Goods
Rub magnesia freely on both sides of silk or worsted goods and hang away. Benzine, ether or soap will take out spots from silk, but remember the goods must not be rubbed. Oil of turpentine or benzine ...
-How To Press And Clean Silks
All satin goods should be pressed upon the right side. To press and clean black silk, shake out all the duet, clean well with a flannel cloth, rubbing it up and down over the silk: this takes out all ...
-How To Make Hard Soap
Place one gallon of good soft soap in a kettle to boil; when it begins to boil, stir in a pint measure level full of common salt, stirring it all the time until the salt is dissolved, then set to cool...
-How To Bleach Muslin
For thirty yards of muslin, take one pound of chloride of lime, dissolve in two quarts rain-water; let cloth soak over night in warm rain-water, or long enough to be thoroughly wet; wring out cloth an...
-How To Wash Lace Curtains
Shake the dust well out of the lace, put in tepid water, in which a little soda has been dissolved, and wash at once carefully with the hands in several waters, or until perfectly clean; rinse in wate...
-How To Do Up Shirt-Bosoms
To fine starch add a piece of Enamel the size of a hazel-nut; if this is not at hand use a table-spoon gum-arabic solution (made by pouring boiling water upon gum-arabic and standing until clear and...
-Washing Fluid
- The very best known, as it saves time, labor, clothes and soap: One pound sal-soda, one-half pound stone lime, five quarts soft water, (some add one-fifth pound borax); boil a short time in copper o...
-How To Wash Woolen Goods
Dissolve a large table-spoon borax in a pint boiling water. Mix one-quarter of it in the cold water in which greasy woolen goods are to be washed. Put in one piece at a time, using soap, if needed; an...
-How To Dry-Starch, Fold And Iron Shirts
In doing up shirts, wristbands and collars should be starched first if the collars are sewed on. Dip them into the hot starch, and as soon as the hand can bear the heat (and dipping the hand in cold w...
-Soap For Family Use
Much of the toilet and laundry soaps in the market are adulterated with injurious, and, to some persons, poisonous sub-tances, by which diseases of the skin are occasioned or greatly aggravated, and g...
-Boiled Soap
- There is no romance or poetry in making boiled soap, only patient hard work; yet without this useful article, what an unpresentable people we should be. Place the grease, consisting of soup-bones an...
-The Cellar And Ice-House
The cellar, when properly constructed and cared for, is the most useful room in the house, and no dwelling is complete without one. It is economy of expense and ground-space to build it under ground, ...
-The Store-Room
A clean, tidy, well-arranged store-room is one sign of a good methodical housekeeper. When stores are put away at hap-hazard, and taken out at any time and in any quantity, disorder and extravagance p...
-The Ice-House
Ice is one of the greatest of summer luxuries, and indeed is almost a necessity. It is so easily put up, even in the country, and so cheaply protected, that there is no reason why any one who is able ...
-Something About Babies
A child's first right is to be well born, of parents sound in body and mind, who can boast a long line of ancestors on both sides; an aristocracy, based on the cardinal virtues of purity, chastity, so...
-Something About Babies. Part 2
Give the baby water six times a day, was one of the most important messages ever sent over the telegraph wires to a young mother. Ignorance bathes her baby on a full stomach, because she rinds it w...
-Something About Babies. Part 3
Dr. Osgood recommends as a night suit for children a single garment, ending in drawers and stockings. Over this, in cold weather, may be worn a flannel sack. At severe seasons, instead of putting an e...
-Aunt Martha's Prescriptions
Give a babe, one to four weeks old, two teanspoons saffron tea (made by simmering a teaspoon dry saffron in half a teacup water), once every other day. If troubled with colic, give catnip tea (simmer...
-Aunt Eva's Way
This is the idea to start with - that we are dealing with little people. To be sure they are fearfully and wonderfully made, but only in the same sense as their parents. As many of these same parents ...
-Teething
When the first signs of the teeth appear, the salivary glands are so far developed that the secretion of saliva is large, and drooling is noticed. This saliva moistens the gums and softens them, so ...
-Sudden Checking Of Perspiration
- A Boston merchant, in lending a hand, on board one of his own ships on a windy day, found himself, at the end of an hour and a half, pretty well exhausted and perspiring freely. He sat down to res...
-The Uses Of A Sand-Bag
One of the most convenient articles to be used in a sick-room is a sand-bag. Get some fine sand, dry it thoroughly in a kettle on the stove, make a bag about eight inches square of flannel, fill it wi...
-Hints For The Well
Cleanliness is next to godliness. Always rest before and after a hearty meal. Do not eat too much. Do not eat late at night. Food, especially bread, should never be eaten hot. Children should neve...
-Hints For The Well. Continued
Keep the person scrupulously clean; change the clothing worn next to the skin (which should be flannel) often. Don't economize in washing bills. A cold bath every morning for very vigorous persons, or...
-A Dyspeptic's Fight For Life
Judge W. was a depressed, despondent, discouraged, listless, moody, nervous, wretched dyspeptic, for five weary years. He tried travel, but neither the keen air of the sea-shore nor the bracing breeze...
-Hints For The Sick-Room
The sick-room should be the lightest, most cheerful, and best ventilated room in the house. Patients in the sunny wards of hospitals recover soonest, and the sick, in nearly all cases, lie with their ...
-Hints For The Sick-Room. Continued
Bathing should al.\vays he done under the advice of a physician, but soap and water are great restoratives. In most cases, washing and properly drying the skin gives great relief. Care should be taken...
-Articles For The Sick-Room
A rubber bag, holding two quarts, to be one-half or three-quarters filled with hot water, and placed about the patient where needed - under head in neuralgia, around the side in liver-congestion, etc....
-The Nose
Excessive wiping, snuffing, and blowing, especially in children, deforms the nose, and should be practiced only when necessary for cleanliness. A nose leaning to one side, caused by wiping in one dire...
-The Eyes
Damp, foggy weather, the reflection of the bright sunshine, intense cold, dusty wind, reading on cars in motion, reading by gas or lamplight when the light falls directly on the eyes, sitting before a...
-Dress
- The first object of dress is protection of the body, second to enhance and bring out its beauty. Dress which does not enhance the beauty of the wearer, or which attracts attention from the wearer to...
-Freckles
- Grate horse-radish fine: let it stand a few hours in buttermilk, then strain and use the wash night and morning. Or, squeeze the juice of a lemon into half a goblet of water and use the same way. Mo...
-Teeth
- Many, while attentive to their teeth, do more injury than good by two much officiousness, daily applying some dentifrice, or tooth-powder, often impure and injurious, and rubbing them so hard as not...
-The Hair
Professor Erasmus Wilson, of London, who is authority on the subject, condemns the washing of hair; but advises that it should be kept clean by brushing, this being a more effective stimulant than wat...
-For Complexion
Blanch one-fourth pound best Jordan almonds, slip off the skin, mash in a mortar, and rub together with best white soap, for fifteen minutes, adding gradually one quart rose-water, or clean fresh rain...
-Taking Care of The Hair
Combs of tortoise-shell, bone, or rubber, with not very sharp teeth, should be used. Sharp teeth injure the scalp and produce dandruff. Two brushes, one hard, to clean the hair and scalp, and the othe...
-The Feet
The largest pores of the bod,y are located in the bottom of the feet. For this reason the feet should be frequentty and thoroughly washed, and the stockings changed often. If great cleanliness is not ...
-Accidents And Sudden Sickness
It is no longer considered a mark of the highest type of the feminine mind to faint away at the smallest fright, and to sink into helplessness at the first appearance of danger. Indeed, self-possessio...
-Foreign Bodies In The Eye
- The particle almost invariably lodges under the upper lid, adhering to it. If that lid is grasped by the thumb and finger, drawn outward and then downward, and then released, the lashes of the lower...
-Suffocation
- This often occurs from carbonic acid gas, or choke-damp, on entering wells or old cellars; this gas being heavier than air, falls and rests at the bottom. Before entering such places, test by lowe...
-Accidents In General
The first and most important thing, after sending for a surgeon, when an accident has occurred, is to keep off the crowd. No one, except one or two in charge, should be allowed nearer than ten feet; a...
-Burns And Scalds
First put the fire out. If the clothing is on fire, throw the person on the ground and wrap in carpet, rug, or your coat, if nothing else is at hand. Begin wrapping at the neck and shoulders, and keep...
-Drowning
- Death is caused by cutting off the supply of fresh air from the lungs, so that the process of purification of the arterial blood ceases, life is rarely restored after an immersion of five or six min...
-Sunstroke
- This is favored by intemperance, and by debility brought on by work in a heated atmosphere. Those who sleep in badly ventilated apartments are most subject to it. Most cases are preceded by pain in ...
-Antidotes To Poisons
The first thing to do is to cause their rejection by vomiting, to do which place mustard mixed with salt on the tongue, or give large quantities of lukewarm water, or tickle the throat with a feather....
-Keeping Cut-Flowers Fresh
Cut-flowers soon drop and fade. Here are some of the ways in which they are preserved: Add to the water a few drops of camphor or ammonia, a little salt, a lump of charcoal; immersing the stems in hot...
-House Plants
- Plants that require a high or low temperature, or a very moist atmosphere, and plants that bloom only in summer are undesirable. Procure fresh sandy loam, with an equal mixture of well rotted turf, ...
-The Care Of House Plants
When plants are frosted sprinkle with fresh cold water, and place under a box or something that will exclude the light and prevent too great a change in temperature. Keep them thus for two days. After...
-Hints About Plants
Few things are necessary for the successful cultivation of house plants. A patient, untiring spirit is most important. The other requisites are plenty of sunlight, fresh air, and water when they need ...
-The Chemistry Of Food
A man may eat his fill and yet be hungry. It is not the quantity but the proper quality in food that satisfies. It is not only true that what is one man's food is another's poison; but it is also true...
-The Chemistry Of Food. Part 2
The heat of the body is produced by the action of the lungs, which uses up the heat-producing food, as action of muscle or brain consumes the muscle-making material. The former is non-nitrogenous; the...
-The Chemistry Of Food. Part 3
The best bread for cold weather is that containing most oil. Corn bread ranks first, oatmeal next, rye third, and wheat last. Of course comparatively few are exposed to the rigors of winter in civiliz...
-The Chemistry Of Food. Part 4
Milk contains all the important elements of food; yet adults need solid food. Add to milk eggs, rich in nitrogen, rice and sugar, rich in carbon, and you have a nutritious dish, easily digested. Butt...
-Dress Making At Home
There are many women who spend but a small sum yearly on dress, but only a few on that little contrive to dress neatly, and closely enough to the prevailing fashion to make a ladylike appearance. Some...
-Dress Making At Home. Part 2
There is a bald economy which shows its pitiful bareness in every point of dress, and there is an economy which struggles to conceal its devices and makeshifts by making everything appear to the best ...
-Dress Making At Home. Part 3
Throwing a dress carelessly upon a chair with other clothes taken off at night, because it is only a common one is a very bad habit. Ordinary dresses are worthy of care, and pay for it by presenting a...
-Dress Making At Home. Part 4
One of the most important things is economy in the manner in which money is spent for work. Many an overtasked woman, feeling it impossible to accomplish all her sewing without assistance, will employ...
-Intelligent Shopping
There are a few things that every shopper ought to know. She should, for one thing, know exactly how much money it is proper or expedient to spend for a certain article. Of course, she is not obliged ...
-Cutting
In cutting goods, economy of material is a consideration never to be lost sight of. Make a close calculation before using the scissors at all, and do not cut any part out until you have discovered the...
-Cutting. Continued
Long seams in the back, extending to the shoulder, are more becoming So stout people than side bodies ending at the armsize. If the shoulders project, an allowance can be made by leaving the back long...
-Renovating
If the silk is very dirty, spread each breadth on a large table, and sponge it upon both sides with warm water mixed with ox gall. - Rinse the silk several times in clear cold water, changing the wate...
-Renovating. Continued
Men have been heard to say that women never brush their dresses. However untrue that sweeping assertion may be, it is certain that too little attention is paid to freeing dresses from the dust of the ...
-Children's Clothing
Very few grown people understand the hardship it is to little folks to wear outgrown or clumsy or ill-fitting garments. Boys are not supposed to have their feelings greatly harrowed at the sight of ha...
-Children's Clothing. Continued
In reading over the ordinary articles upon children's fashions, one is constantly struck with the similarity of the materials advised for their clothing, to those used for grown people. There seem to ...
-Elderly Ladies
Young people sometimes feel that it makes very little difference how mothers and grandmothers dress as long as they themselves can make as fair a show as the family circumstances allow - a mistake whi...
-Coloring And Bleaching
In coloring always use plenty of water (soft water when obtainable); never crowd the goods, taking care that they float in the liquid. The rule is four gallons of water to one pound of goods. In rinsi...
-Solferino And Magenta Dyes On White Woolen, Silk, Or Cotton And Woolen Mixtures
For one pound of woolen goods, Magenta shade, ninety-six grains, apothecaries' weight, of aniline red will be required; dissolve in a little warm alcohol, using - say - six fluid ounces of alcohol, or...
-How To Clean Furs
For dark furs, warm a quantity of new bran in a pan, taking care that it does not burn, to prevent which it must be briskly stirred. When well warmed, rub it thoroughly into the fur with the hand. .Re...
-Medical
When people fall sick they seem to lose what little common sense they possessed when well. Men and women who are reasonably wise and reasonable in other matters, cherish the most absurd superstitions,...
-Cure For Felon
When a felon first makes its appearance, take the inside skin of an egg-shell, and wrap it around the part affected. When the pressure becomes too painful, wet it with water, and keep it on twelve hou...
-For Constipation
The same remedies will not affect all persons. One or two figs eaten fasting is sufficient for some, and they are especially good in the case of children, as there is no trouble in getting them to tak...
-Scarlet Fever, Or Scarlatina
- When to the feeling of general illness which accompanies all fevers is added a very rapid pulse, 120-130. and a temperature of 100-104-105, and there is a dry, hot feeling in the thr...
-The Treatment Of Diphtheria
The symptoms of diphtheria are much like a common sore throat accompanied by a severe cold. The sore throat is accompanied with more fever than an ordinary cold, and there is an indescribable sickish ...
-Mother Kroh's Felon Salve
- Take two pounds of fat from the outside of ham or smoked meat, six onions, resin and beeswax, each the size of an egg (use the common dark resin and wax, and for summer use increase the proportion o...
-Allopathic Treatment Of Diphtheria
- One of the most successful physicians in treating this dreaded disease gives the following directions for dealing with it. Mothers should accustom themselves and their children when young to examine...
-Water Treatment At Home
- The following methods of treatment with water, etc., have been tested, and we know whereof we speak when we say they work like a charm. A thermometer is needed to test the temperature, as the terms ...
-The Sitz-Bath
This is a very pleasant remedy for a great many ills. To take, have a sitz-bath tub, which is either of tin or wood, something the shape of a chair, the seat being the tub, and the back is hollowed ou...
-The Foot-Bath
This good old remedy for colds, etc., as given, was always attended with the risk of taking more cold. This is easily overcome by the very simple adjunct of a pail of cold water in which to plunge the...
-Fomentations
- The method of giving this treatment is very simple, and yet very few give them correctly. First, have flannel cloths, made of four thicknesses white shaker-flannel (or pieces of a blanket), sewed ac...
-Female Weaknesses
- One of the best treatments for leucorrhea, ulceration, and, in fact, any female weakness, is the hot vaginal enema. The best syringe to use is one that has only side openings in the metal tube, and ...
-Compresses
- The use of compresses is good for so many ailments that one should know how to apply them. Compress cloths are made of two or three thicknesses of old linen (crash toweling is good), and can be of w...
-Packs
- First, it is much more convenient if you can have what is called a packing cot made. A good proportion for the frame-work is thirty inches wide, twenty-five inches high, with the slats placed on a...
-Oil-Rubs
This treatment is one that gives perfect satisfaction to all who try it; indeed, too much praise can not be given to it. To see the effects of oil-rubs, one would say as did the Queen of Sheba, The h...
-Diphtheria
- This dreaded disease needs all the knowledge one can possibly obtain, so we give below the hygienic treatment as prescribed by Dr. J. H. Jackson, of Our Home, Dansville, N. Y. First, he says, to t...
-Whooping-Cough
Children do not whoop for two or three weeks after taking this disease. The most reliable symptoms are, eyes red and watery when they cough, and the cough clinging to the patient with a firm grasp. ...
-Fob Croup
To one-half cup N. 0. molasses add a tea-spoon soda, beat to a white froth, and give a tea-spoon every few minutes till relieved by vomiting; or one part pulverized alum to two parts white sugar, and ...
-Fever And Ague
This, the true intermittent fever, comes on with an ague-fit, which has three stages - the cold, the hot, and the sweating. In the first stage, the patient yawns, stretches, feels weak, has no appetit...
-Bilious Remittent Fever
- This makes its attack in a sudden and marked manner. There are no premonitory symptoms except, perhaps, a little languor and debility, slight headache, and a bad taste in the mouth, sometimes some p...
-Congestive Fever
- Another form of malarious fever is the congestive. It may be either remittent - that is, abating considerably; or intermittent - that is, having intervals of entire freedom from fever. It may have i...
-Hay Fever (Or Asthma)
This very peculiar disease appears generally as a severe attack of catarrh, with asthmatic symptoms superadded. The lining membrane of the eyes, nose, throat and lungs is all more or less affected. Th...
-Typhoid Fever
- Typhoid fever is generally preceded by several days of languor, low spirits, and indisposition to exertion. There is also, usually, some pain in the back and head, loss of appetite, and drowsiness, ...
-Yellow Fever
- This disease is most prevalent in hot climates, and southern cities of our country. It comes in the latter part of summer, and lasts till frosty weather. The disease begins with a chill, generally n...
-Food For Babies
Mix a babe's food milk with its due proportion of sugar, and place the pitcher holding it in a deep plate - a soup-plate or pie-dish will do - and fill the plate with cold water. Take a piece of thin ...
-Headaches
- Headaches are always symptoms of some derangement of the system in some of its parts, and should not be neglected. In children, they generally indicate the approach of some disease. In adults, they ...
-Palpitation Of Heart
Palpitation and irregular action of the heart are often experienced in persons between the ages of sixteen and twenty years; they are, or have generally been, growing rapidly, are of delicate appearan...
-Jaundice
- A disease characterized by yellowness of the skin and eyes and urine, the discharges from the bowels being of a whitish or clay color. It is caused by the excretion of bile being prevented and retai...
-Black For Woolens
One ounce vitriol, one ounce extract logwood to two pounds goods; color in iron. Dissolve the extract over night in warm water; pulverize the vitriol, put it into boiling water sufficient to cover the...
-The Cistern
An abundant supply of good water is a necessity for every house, and capacious cisterns are a necessity. Two essential requisites are good hydraulic lime and clean pure sand. The hydraulic cement beco...
-The Lightning Rod
When properly put up, the lightning rod is a perfect protection; but, when not scientifically constructed, is only a source of danger. The following are essentials: 1. It must extend several feet into...
-Canary Birds
- Do not keep in a room that is being painted or has odor of new paint. Do not hang over a stove or grate which contains fire. Do not set the cage in a window, and shut it down upon it; the draft is i...
-Uses Of Charcoal
Charcoal laid flat while cold on a burn, cause the pain to abate immediately; by leaving it on for an hour the burn seems almost healed when the wound is superficial. Tainted meat surrounded with it, ...
-How To Detect Poison Ivy
The poison ivy and the innocuous kind differ in one particular which is too easy of remembrance to be overlooked by any one who is interested enough in the brilliant-hued leaves of autumn to care for ...
-The Best Rat Trap
Rats are very sharp to spy out traps. Any trap that has caught one without being deodorized is not likely to catch another, and old ones are hard to catch by any sort of trap. The best method, however...
-Hydrophobia And Its Symptoms
The following valuable hints regarding the symptoms of that terrible disease, hydrophobia, are from a lecture delivered in St. Paul, by the Rev. E. C. Mitchell, of that city: The period of actual da...
-A Book That Wins
We have issued a new book on Society, and the Rules that Govern It, that is as popular and practical, in its way, as Buckeye Cookery. It is Manners That Win, And is as much superior to other ...
-The Yeast - Bread With Buttermilk
The Yeast After the flour, the yeast or leaven is the next essential element in bread. For regular fare most, especially women, prefer yeast bread, but men who can not forget how their mother use...
-Good Bread - Eastern Brown Bread
Good Bread For four small loaves boil four large potatoes; when done, pour off the water, and when it cools add to it a yeast cake; mash the potato very fine, put through a sieve, pour boiling milk o...
-Brown Bread - Steamed Corn Bread
Brown Bread Two and one-half cups sour milk, and one-half cup molasses; into these put one heaping tea-spoon soda, two cups corn meal, one cup Graham flour and one tea-spoon salt. Use coffee cups. St...
-Graham Bread - Rye Bread
Graham Bread Take a little over a quart of warm water, one-half cup brown sugar or molasses, one-fourth cup hop yeast, and one and one-half tea-spoons salt; thicken the water with unbolted flour to a...
-Rye Bread - Bread Puffs
Rye Bread Make sponge as for wheat bread, let rise over night, then mix it up with the rye flour (not so stiff as wheat bread), and bake. Baking Powder Sixteen ounces corn starch, eight of bicarbon...
-Pocket-Books - Hard Tea Biscuit
Pocket-Books Warm one quart new milk, add one cup butter or lard, four tablespoons sugar, and two well-beaten eggs; stir in flour enough to make a moderately stiff sponge, add a small cup of yeast, a...
-High Biscuit - Sally Lunn
High Biscuit On baking days, reserve one small loaf and mix a rounded tablespoon butter, a level table-spoon sugar and one egg into it by pulling it to pieces with the hands; knead into a loaf, let i...
-Tea Cake - Every-day Rolls
Tea Cake One quart flour, one cup sour milk, one tea-spoon soda, one-half pound lard, one-half pound chopped raisins or currants; roll two inches thick and bake in a quick oven; split open, butter, a...
-Italian Rolls - Vienna Rolls
Italian Rolls A pound of bread dough, quarter-pound softened butter: work the butter well into the dough, and roll out about half an inch thick; cut into strips nearly an inch wide and seven or eight...
-Cracknells - Egg Crackers
Cracknells To one pint of rich milk put two ounces butter and spoon of yeast. Make it warm, and mix enough fine flour to make a light dough; roll thin and cut in long pieces, two inches broad. Prick ...
-Corn Dodgers - Good Graham Gems
Corn Dodgers To one quart corn meal add a little salt and a small table-spoon lard; scald with boiling water and beat hard for a few minutes; drop a large spoonful in a well-greased pan. The batter s...
-Sweet-milk Gems - Clam Fritters
Sweet-milk Gems Beat one egg well, add a pint new milk, a little salt, and Graham flour until it will drop off the spoon nicely; heat and butter the gem-pans before dropping in the dough; bake in a h...
-Corn Oysters - Batter Cakes
Corn Oysters To one quart grated corn add three eggs and three or four grated crackers, beat well and season with pepper and salt; have ready in skillet butter and lard or beef-drippings in equal pro...
-Bread Cakes - Dry Yeast
Bread Cakes Take stale bread and soak over night in sour milk; in the morning rub through a colander, and to one quart add the yolks of two eggs, one tea-spoon salt, one tea-spoon soda, two table-spo...
-Angel's Food - Buford Cake
Angel's Food Use the whites of eleven eggs, one and a half tumbler of sifted granulated sugar, one tumbler sifted flour, one tea-spoon of vanilla, one tea-spoon of cream tartar; sift the flour four t...
-Black Cake - Whipped-cream Cake
Black Cake One pound powdered white sugar, three-quarters pound butter, pound sifted flour (brown or not as preferred), twelve eggs beaten separately, two pounds raisins stoned and part of them chopp...
-Corn-starch Cake - Delicate Cake
Corn-starch Cake Two coffee-cups pulverized sugar, three-fourths cup butter, cup corn starch dissolved in a cup of sweet milk, two cups flour, whites of seven eggs, two tea-spoons cream tartar, tea-s...
-Fruit Cake - Old Hickory Cake
Fruit Cake One cup butter, one of brown sugar, half pint molasses, two eggs, cup sour milk, tea-spoon soda, pound of flour, one of currants, one and a half pounds raisins. Flavor to taste. This has b...
-Everlasting Cake - Old Hickory Cake
Everlasting Cake Beat together the yolks of six eggs and three-fourths of a pint white sugar, add one and a half pints blanched and shelled almonds, half pound sliced citron well floured, and the whi...
-Hickory-nut Cake - Marbled Chocolate Cake
Hickory-nut Cake A cup butter, two of sugar, three of flour, one of sweet milk, whites of seven and yolks of two eggs, a tea-spoon soda, two of cream tartar, one pint hickory-nut meats rolled and spr...
-Orange Cake - Sponge Cake
Orange Cake Two cups sugar, four eggs, leaving out the whites of two, half cup butter, one of water, two tea-spoons baking-powder, three cups flour, juice, grated rind, and pulp of one orange; use th...
-Sponge Cake
Three eggs, one and a half cups powdered sugar, two of sifted flour, two tea-spoons cream tartar, half cup cold water, tea-spoon soda, grated rind and half the juice of one lemon; bake in dripping-pan...
-Snow Cake - Wedding Cake
Phil Sheridan Cake Four cups fine white sugar, five of sifted flour, one of butter, one and a half of sweet milk, one tea-spoon soda dissolved in the milk, two of cream tartar, whites of sixteen eggs...
-White Cake - Cream For Inside
White Cake One cup butter, two of sugar, one of sweet milk, three of flour, whites of five eggs, two tea-spoons baking powder. Easily made, and very good. - Mrs. Daniel Miller. White Perfection Cake...
-Golden Cream Cake - Delicious Chocolate Cake
Golden Cream Cake Cream one cup sugar and one-fourth cup butter, add half cup sweet milk, the well beaten whites of three eggs, one and a half cups flour, with half a tea-spoon soda, and a tea-spoon ...
-Chocolate Cake - White Part
Chocolate Cake One cup butter, two of sugar, one of milk, five eggs, leaving out the whites of three, four cups sifted flour, two tea-spoons baking powder, or one small tea-spoon soda and two of crea...
-Orange Cake - Thanksgiving Cake
Orange Cake One cup butter, one of water, two of sugar, four of flour, three eggs, three tea-spoons baking-powder; bake in layers. Take the juice of two large or three small oranges, coffee-cup pulve...
-Velvet Sponge Cake - White Mountain Cake
Velvet Sponge Cake Two cups sugar, six eggs leaving out the whites of three, one cup boiling hot water, two and one half cups flour, one table-spoon baking-powder in the flour; beat the yolks a littl...
-Frosting
Almond Frosting Blanch half pint sweet almonds by putting them in boiling water, stripping off the skins, and spreading upon a dry cloth, until cold; pound a few of them at a time in a mortar till we...
-Doughnuts
Corn Meal Doughnuts A tea-cup and a half boiling milk poured over two tea-cups meal; when cool add two cups flour, one of butter, one and one-half of sugar, three eggs; flavor with nutmeg or cinnamon...
-Berlin Pancakes - Nutmeg Cookies
Berlin Pancakes Roll out dough slightly sweetened and shortened, as if for very plain doughnuts; cut in circles like biscuit, put a tea-spoon currant jam or jelly on the center of one, lay another up...
-Sand Tarts - Fried Cakes
Sand Tarts Two cups sugar, one of butter, three of flour, two eggs, leaving out the white of one; roll out thin and cut in square cakes with a knife; spread the white of egg on top, sprinkle with cin...
-Ginger-Bread
If in making ginger-bread the dough becomes too stiff before it is rolled out, set it before the fire. Snaps will not be crisp if made on a rainy day. Ginger-bread and cakes require a moderate oven, s...
-Ginger Cookies - Ginger-snaps
Ginger Cookies Two cups molasses, one of lard, one of sugar, two-thirds cup sour milk, table-spoon ginger, three tea-spoons soda stirred in the flour and one in the milk, two eggs. - Miss Tina Lay, ...
-Cream
Hamburg Cream Stir together the rind and juice of two large lemons, and one cup sugar, add the well-beaten yolks of eight eggs; put all in a tin pail, set in a pot of boiling water, stir for three mi...
-Whipped Cream - Boiled Custard
Whipped Cream Place cream over ice until thoroughly chilled, and whip with an egg-beater or whip-churn until it froths. While whipping place froth on a sieve, and return to bowl to be re-whipped all ...
-Chocolate Custard - Lemon Custard
Chocolate Custard Break two sections chocolate in a half-dozen pieces, put it in a pan over boiling water, with milk enough to barely cover it; mash and stir perfectly smooth, then add the rest of th...
-Snow Custard - Prune Whip
Snow Custard Half a package of Coxe's gelatine, three eggs, two cups of sugar, juice of one lemon; soak the gelatine one hour in a tea-cup of cold water, add one pint boiling water, stir until thorou...
-Almond Macaroons - Chocolate Drops
Almond Macaroons Pour boiling water on half a pound almonds, take skins off and throw into cold water for a few moments, then take out and pound (adding a table-spoon essence lemon) to a smooth paste...
-Cocoa-nut Caramels - Canned Berries
Cocoa-nut Caramels One pint milk, butter size of an egg, one cocoa-nut grated fine (or dessicated cocoa-nut may be used), three pounds white sugar, two tea-spoons lemon, boil slowly until stiff (some...
-Canned Berries
Canned Berries Select those the skins of which have not been broken, or the juice will darken the syrup; fill cans compactly, set in a kettle of cold water, with a cloth beneath them, over an even he...
-Canned Peaches
Pour boiling water over one peck of large clingstone peaches to remove the fuzz; make a syrup of three pounds sugar and one pint vinegar, using a little water if required to cover the peaches; cook un...
-Canned Pears - Canned Strawberries
Canned Pears Prepare and can precisely like peaches in preceding recipe, except, that they require longer cooking. When done they are easily pierced with a silver fork. Canned Pie Plant Cut the pie...
-Canned Corn - Canned Watermelon
Canned Corn Dissolve an ounce tartaric acid in half tea-cup water, and take one table-spoon to two quarts of sweet corn; cook, and while boiling hot, fill the cans, which should be tin. When used tur...
-Cucumber Catsup - Celery Sauce
Cucumber Catsup Three dozen cucumbers and eighteen onions peeled and chopped very fine; sprinkle over them three-fourths pint table-salt, put the whole in a sieve, and let drain well over night; add ...
-Cream Sauce - Lemon Sauce
Cream Sauce Heat one table-spoon butter in a skillet, add a tea-spoon flour, and stir until perfectly smooth, then add gradually one cup of cold milk, let boil up once, season to taste with salt and ...
-Mayonnaise Sauce - Tartare Sauce
Mayonnaise Sauce Mix in a two-quart bowl one even tea-spoon ground mustard, one of salt, and one and a half of vinegar; beat in the yolk of a raw egg, then add very gradually half a pint pure olive-o...
-Tomato Sauce - Pepper Vinegar
Tomato Sauce Stew ten tomatoes with three cloves, and pepper and salt, for fifteen minutes (some add a sliced onion and sprig of parsley), strain through a sieve, put on the stove in a saucepan in wh...
-Coffee
Army Coffee Coffee or tea may be made quickly by placing the required quantity of cold water in the pot, and adding the coffee, tied up in a sack of fine gauze, or piece of muslin; bring to boiling p...
-Vienna Chocolate - Lemon Syrup
Vienna Chocolate Put into a coffee-pot set in boiling water, one quart of new milk (or a pint each of cream and milk), stir into it three heaping tablespoons grated chocolate mixed to a paste with co...
-Egg Recipes
Baked Eggs Break eight eggs into a well-buttered dish, put in pepper and salt, bits of butter, and three table-spoons cream; set in oven and bake about twenty minutes; serve very hot. Birds' Nest B...
-Eggs. Continued
Pickled Eggs Pint strong vinegar, half pint cold water, tea-spoon each of cinna, mon, allspice, and mace; boil the eggs till very hard and take off the shell; put on the spices tied in a white muslin...
-Baked Fish
Clean, rinse, and wipe dry a white fish, or any fish weighing three or four pounds, rub the fish inside and out with salt and pepper, fill with a stuffing made like that for poultry, but drier; sew it...
-Boiled Fish
To boil a fish, fill with a rich dressing of rolled crackers seasoned with butter, pepper, salt and sage, wrap it in a well-floured cloth, tie closely with twine or sew, and place in well-salted boili...
-Broiled White Fish - Fish Chowder
Broiled White Fish Clean, split down the back, and let stand in salted water for several hours; wipe dry, and place on a well-greased gridiron over hot coals, sprinkling with salt and pepper. Put fle...
-Fried Fish - Steamed Fish
Fried Fish Clean thoroughly, cut off the head, and, if large, cut out the backbone, and slice the body crosswise into five or six pieces; dip in Indian meal or wheat flour, or in a beaten egg, and th...
-Stewed Fish
Stewed Fish Cut a fish across in slices an inch and a half thick, and sprinkle with salt; boil two sliced onions until done, pour off water, season with pepper, add two tea-cups hot water and a littl...
-Fruit Salads
Ambrosia, Or Fruit Salad Six sweet oranges peeled and sliced (seeds and as much of the core as possible taken out), one pine-apple peeled and sliced (the canned is equally good), and one large cocoa-...
-Black Caps - Baked Pears
Black Caps Pare and core tart apples with apple-corer, fill the center with sugar, stick four cloves in the top of each, and bake in deep pie-plates, with a little water. Fried Bananas Peel and sli...
-Peach Pyramid - Oranged Strawberries
Baked Peaches Wash peaches which are nearly or quite ripe, place in a deep dish, sprinkle with sugar, cover and bake until tender. Stewed Pie-plant. Make a rich syrup by adding sugar to water in whi...
-Snow Flakes - Fig Sauce
Snow Flakes Grate a large cocoa-nut into a glass dish, and serve with cream, preserves, jellies or jams. Peach Meringue Put on to boil a quart of milk, omitting half a cup with which to moisten two...
-Broiled Quail - Roast Haunch Of Venison
Broiled Pheasant Or Prairie Chicken Scald and skin, cut off the breast and cut the rest up in joints, being careful to remove all shot; put in hot water all except the breast (which will be tender en...
-Roast Duck - Fried Woodcock
Roast Duck Ducks are dressed and stuffed in the same manner as above. Young ducks should roast from twenty-five to thirty minutes; full-grown for an hour or more with frequent basting. Some prefer th...
-Chocolate Ice-cream - Kentucky Cream
Chocolate Ice-cream Scald one pint new milk, add by degrees three-quarters of a pound sugar, two eggs, and five table-spoons chocolate, rub smooth in a little milk. Beat well for a moment or two, pla...
-Apple Ice - Crab Apple Jelly
Apple Ice Grate, sweeten and freeze well-flavored apples, pears, peaches or quinces. Canned fruit may be mashed and prepared in the same way. Currant Ice Boil down three pints of water and a pound ...
-Coffee Jelly - Currant Jam
Coffee Jelly Half box Coxe's gelatine soaked half an hour in a half tea-cup cold water (as little water as possible), one quart strong coffee, made as if for the table and sweetened to taste; add the...
-Gooseberry Jam - Boiled Beef Tongue
Gooseberry Jam Stew the berries in a little water, press through a coarse sieve return to the kettle, add three-fourths pound sugar to each pound of the pulped gooseberry; boil three-quarters of an h...
-Broiled Beefsteak - Boiled Beef Tongue
Broiled Beefsteak Lay a thick tender steak upon a gridiron well greased with butter or beef auet, over hot coals; when done on one side have ready the warmed platter with a little butter on it, lay t...
-Ragout Of Beef - Larded Liver
Ragout Of Beef For six pounds of the round, take half dozen ripe tomatoes, cut up with two or three onions in a vessel with a tight cover, add half a dozen cloves, a stick of cinnamon, and a little w...
-Fried Tripe - Boned Ham
Fried Tripe Dredge with flour, or dip in egg and cracker crumbs, fry in hot butter, or other fat, until a delicate brown on both sides, lay it on a dish, add vinegar to the gravy, and pour over the t...
-Delicious Fried Ham - Veal With Oysters
Boned Ham Having soaked a well-cured ham in tepid water over night, boil it till perfectly tender, putting it on in warm water; take up in a wooden tray, let cool, remove bone carefully, press the ha...
-Stuffed Heart - Apple Custard Pie
Stuffed Heart Take a beef's or sheep's or veal's heart, wash deeply and thoroughly so as to remove all blood, make the two cells into one by cutting through the partition with a long, sharp knife, be...
-Dried Apple Pie - Whipped Cream Pie
Dried Apple Pie Very good pies may be made of the Alden dried apples, by stewing in a very little water; sweeten and make like any other. The home dried apples are best when stewed very soft, and...
-Cocoa-nut Pie - Lemon Pie
Cocoa-nut Pie One pint milk, a cocoa-nut, tea-cup sugar, three eggs; grate cocoa-nut, mix with the yolks of the eggs and sugar, stir in the milk, filling the pan even full, and bake. Beat whites of e...
-Appleless Mince-Meat - Potato Pie
Appleless Mince-Meat Chop fine eight pounds green tomatoes, add six pounds sugar, one-ounce each of cloves, cinnamon and allspice, simmer slowly till tomatoes are clear, then put away in a covered ja...
-Preserve Puffs - A Kentucky Girl's Pumpkin Pie
Preserve Puffs Roll out puff-paste very thin, cut into round pieces, and lay jam on each, fold over the paste, wet edges with white of an egg, and close them; lay them on a baking sheet, ice them, an...
-Apple Holey Poley - Rice Apples
Apple Holey Poley Peel, quarter and core sour apples, make rich soda-biscuit dough, {or raised-biscuit dough may be used if rolled thinner), roll to half an inch thick, slice the quarters, and lay on...
-Bread Pudding - Cocoa-nut Pudding
Bread Pudding One quart sweet milk, quart bread-crumbs, four eggs, four tablespoons sugar; soak bread in half the milk until soft; mash fine, add the rest of milk, the well-beaten eggs and sugar, and...
-English Carrot Pudding - Baked Indian Pudding
English Carrot Pudding One pound grated carrots, three-fourths pound chopped suet, half pound each raisins and currants, four table-spoons sugar, eight table-spoons flour, and spices to suit the tast...
-Delicious Lemon Pudding - Culpepper Pudding
Lemon Pudding Stir into yolks of six eggs one cup sugar, half a cup water, and the grated yellow rind and juice of two lemons; soften in warm water six crackers or some slices of cake, lay in bottom ...
-Prairie Plum Pudding - Prune Pudding
English Plum Pudding Beat six yolks and four whites of eggs very light, and add to them a tumbllr of sweet milk; stir in gradually one-fourth pound grated or chopped stale bread, a pound flour, three...
-Rice Snow Balls - Plain Cream Sauce
Rice Snow Balls Boil one pint rice until soft in two quarts water with a tea-spoon salt; put in small cups, and when perfectly cold place in a dish. Make a boiled custard of the yolks of three eggs, ...
-Foaming Sauce - Vinegar Sauce
Foaming Sauce Beat whites of three eggs to a stiff froth; melt tea-cup of sugar in a little water, let it boil, stir in one glass wine, and then the whites of the three eggs; serve at once. - Mrs. Ca...
-Whipped Cream Sauce - Pear Preserves
Whipped Cream Sauce Whip a pint of thick sweet cream, add the beaten whites of two eggs, sweeten to taste; place pudding in center of dish, and surround with the sauce; or pile up in center and surro...
-Plum Preserves - Tomato Preserves
Plum Preserves Allow equal weights sugar and plums; add sufficient water to the sugar to make a thick syrup, boil, skim, and pour over the plums (previously washed, pricked and placed in a stone jar)...
-Apple Butter - Quince Marmalade
Apple Butter Boil one barrel of new cider down half, peel and core three bushels of good cooking apples; when the cider has boiled to half the quantity, add the apples, and when soft, stir constantly...
-Dried Apple Sauce - Pickled Artichokes
Dried Apple Sauce Look over, wash thoroughly and soak fifteen minutes in clean warm water; drain, cover with cold soft water, place on the stove,, let boil slowly two to four hours, mash fine, sweete...
-Bean Pickles - Peach Mangoes
Bean Pickles Pick green beans of the best variety, when young and tender, string, and place in a kettle to boil, with salt to taste, until they can be pierced with a fork, drain well through a coland...
-French Pickles - Spanish Pickles
French Pickles One peck green tomatoes sliced, six large onions sliced; mix these and throw over them one tea-cup of salt, and let them stand over night; next day drain thoroughly and boil in one qua...
-Ripe Tomato Pickles - Spiced Nutmeg Melon
Ripe Tomato Pickles Pare ripe, sound tomatoes (do not scald), put in a jar; scald spices (tied in a bag) in vinegar, and pour while hot over them. This recipe is best for persons who prefer raw tomat...
-Pear Pickles - Mint Vinegar
Pear Pickles Prepare syrup as for peaches, pare and cut fruit in halves, or quarters if very large, and if small leave whole, put syrup in porcelain kettle, and when it boils put in fruit, cook until...
-Vinegar
Clover Vinegar Put a large bowl of molasses in a crock, and pour over it nine bowls of boiling rain-water; let stand until milk-warm, put in two quarts of clover blossoms, and two cups of baker's yea...
-Baked Chicken With Parsnips - Chickens For Lunch
Baked Chickens Dress the chickens and cut them in two, soak for half an hour in cold water, wipe perfectly dry and put in a dripping-pan, bone side down, without any water; have a hot oven, and, if t...
-Chicken Pudding - Pickled Chicken
Chicken Pudding Dress and cut one chicken into small pieces, put it into a saucepan or kettle with a little water, season with salt and pepper, let boil until it begins to grow tender, then take out ...
-Pressed Chicken - Pickled Chicken
Pressed Chicken Take one or two chickens, boil in a small quantity of water with a little salt, and when thoroughly done, take all the meat from the bones, removing the skin, and keeping the light me...
-Turkey
Boiled Turkey Wash the turkey thoroughly and rub salt through it; fill it with a dressing of bread and butter, moistened with milk and seasoned with sage, salt and pepper, and mixed with a pint of ra...
-Sidney Smith's Winter Salad - Plain Cold Slaw
Sidney Smith's Winter Salad Two large potatoes, passed through kitchen sieve, Unwonted softness to the salad give; Of mordant mustard add a single spoon Distrust the condiment which bites too soon;...
-Chicken Salad - Cucumber Salad
Chicken Salad Chop fine one chicken cooked tender, one head cabbage, and five cold hard-boiled eggs; season with salt, pepper and mustard to taste; warm one pint vinegar, add half a tea-cup butter, s...
-Herring Salad - Salmon Salad
Herring Salad Soak over night three Holland herrings cut in very small pieces; cook and peel eight medium potatoes, and when cold chop with two small cooked red beets, two onions, a few sour apples, ...
-Tomato Salad - Oyster Salad
Tomato Salad Take the skin, juice, and seeds from nice, fresh tomatoes, chop what remains with celery, and add a good salad-dressing. Salad Dressing Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs rubbed very fine a...
-Clam - Crab
Clam Stew Take half peck hard-shell clams, wash shells clean, and put in a kettle with about one tea-cup water; let steam until the shells open, when take out of shell, strain juice, and return it wi...
-Oysters
Boiled Oysters Wash shell-oysters perfectly clean, place in a small willow basket, drop in a kettle of boiling water, and when shells open, lift basket, and serve oysters on the half shell. Broiled ...
-Asparagus Soup - Beef Soup
Asparagus Soup Cut the tops from about thirty heads of asparagus, about half an inch long, and boil the rest; cut off all the tender portions and rub through a sieve, adding a little salt; warm three...
-Bean Soup - Green Corn Soup
Bean Soup Boil a small soup-bone in about two quarts water until the meat can be separated from the bone, remove bone, add a coffee-cup white beans soaked for two hours, boil for an hour and a half, ...
-Gumbo - Pot Au Feu
Gumbo Slice a large onion and put it with a slice of bacon or fat ham into a skillet and brown it; skin and cut up two quarts tomatoes, cut thin one quart okra, put all together with a little parsley...
-Green Pea Soup - Vegetable Soup
Green Pea Soup ' Boil three pints shelled pease in three quarts of water; when quite soft, mash through a colander, adding a little water to free the pulp from the skins; return pulp to the water in ...
-Veal Soup - Fried Asparagus
Veal Soup To about three pounds of a well-broken joint of veal, add four quarts water, and set it over to boil; prepare one-fourth pound macaroni by boiling it in a dish by itself with enough water t...
-Beet Greens - Stewed Carrots
Beet Greens Wash young beets very clean, cut off tips of leaves, looking over carefully to see that no bugs or worms remain, but do not separate roots from leaves; fill dinner-pot half full of salted...
-Stewed Corn - Preserved Corn
Stewed Corn Cut with a sharp knife through the center of every row of grains, and cut off the outer edge; then with the back of the blade push out the yellow eye, with the rich, creamy center of the ...
-Escaloped Cauliflower
Boil till very tender, drain well and cut in small pieces; put it in layers with fine chopped egg and this dressing: half pint of milk thickened over boiling water, with two table-spoons of flour and ...
-Wilted Lettuce
Place in a vegetable dish lettuce that has been very carefully picked and washed each leaf by itself, to remove all insects. Cut across the dish four or five times, and sprinkle with salt. Fry a small...
-Cabbage
Heidelberg Cabbage Select two small, solid heads of hard red cabbage; divide them in halves from crown to stem; lay the split side down, and cut downwards in thin slices. The cabbage will then be in ...
-Macaroni
Baked Macaroni Take about three ounces macaroni and boil till tender in a stew-pan with a little water; take a pudding dish or pan, warm a little butter in it, and put in a layer of macaroni, then a ...
-Boiled Okra
Put the young and tender pods of long, white okra in salted boil* ing water in a porcelain or tin-lined sauce-pan (as iron discolors it), boil fifteen minutes, take off stems, and serve with butter, p...
-Potatoes
Potatoes Boiled Or Baked In Jackets Wash clean (a brush is the best implement for cleaning potatoes), cut off the ends, let stand in cold water a few hours, put into boiling water, the larger ones fi...
-Baked Parsnips - Green Pease
Baked Parsnips Put four thin slices salt pork in a kettle with two quarts cold water, wash and scrape parsnips, and if large halve or quarter, and as soon as water boils place in kettle, boil about h...
-Salsify Or Vegetable Oysters - Spinach
Salsify Or Vegetable Oysters Parboil after scraping off the outside, cut in slices, dip it into a beaten egg and fine bread-crumbs, and fry in lard. Or, slice crosswise five or six good-sized plants,...
-Tomatoes
Baked Tomatoes Cut a thin slice from blossom side of twelve solid, smooth, ripe tomatoes, with a tea-spoon remove pulp without breaking shell; take a small, solid head of cabbage and one onion, chop ...
-Turnips
Diced Turnips Pare, slice, cut in dice an inch square, boil till nearly done, in as little water as possible; to one quart of turnips, add one table-spoon sugar, salt to make it palatable; when they ...
-Crystallization - Icing
Crystallization consists in simply covering the cake while the icing is wet with granulated sugar, plain or pink. (For coloring sugar pink see meringue icing). Or you can use pink or white sugar or ...
-Raspberry Puff - Real English Banbury Cake
Raspberry Puff Proceed precisely the same as for open tarts. When you have cut the desired number, roll them out thin, about six inches in diameter, Now place a teaspoouful of raspberry preserves on ...
-Fancy Or Book Sausage Roll - Refreshments For Twenty
Fancy Or Book Sausage Roll Take a piece of best puff paste, roll it out to an eighth of an inch in thickness; then cut it up in squares four inches square, lay them out on board; then have the sausag...
-Refreshments For A Hundred - Fall Picnics
Refreshments For A Hundred For a larger company of a hundred the refreshments maybe more elaborate: Two gallons of pickled oysters; two large dishes of lobster salad; two small hams boiled and sliced...
-Ham Balls - Lancashire Pie
Ham Balls Chop fine, cold, cooked ham; add an egg for each person, and a little flour; beat together, make into balls, and fry brown in hot butter. Corn-Meal Cake Two-thirds cup butter, one cup sug...
-Bread-Crumbs For Pastry - A Lunch Dish
Bread-Crumbs For Pastry Many puddings that are commonly baked in a crust, such as cocoa-nut, potato, apple, and lemon, are equally as good and more wholesome, made by strewing grated bread-crumbs ove...
-Soyer's Receipt For Cooking Eggs - Plain Boiled Indian Pudding
Soyer's Receipt For Cooking Eggs - Take two or three large onions, slice-them very thin, and fry till a nice brown. Have ready three or four hard-boiled eggs cut in slices, and a cupful of nice gravy...
-Veal And Ham Pie - Potato Cakes
Veal And Ham Pie Cut the veal and ham into thin slices, lay a slice of ham (about one-third the slice of the veal, season it with the seasoning as given above, and roll them up and place them in the ...
-Escaloped Turkey - Scrapple
Escaloped Turkey - Moisten bread-crumbs with a little milk, butter a pan and put in it a layer of crumbs, then a layer of chopped (not very fine) cold turkey seasoned with salt and pepper, then a lay...
-Fricasseed And Fried Potatoes - Liquids
Fricasseed And Fried Potatoes Slice cold boiled potatoes, put into a dripping-pan, add milk, salt, pepper, and small lump of butter, allowing half a pint of milk to a dozen potatoes, place in oven fo...
-Household Recipes
Kalsomining If papering and painting, or kalsomining are to be done, do the last named first. Wash ceiling that has been smoked by the kerosene lamp, with a strong solution of soda. Fill all cracks i...
-How To Cleanse A Sponge - Kerosene And Carpets
How To Cleanse A Sponge By rubbing a fresh lemon thoroughly into a soured sponge and rinsing it several times in lukewarm water, it will become as sweet as when new. How To Remove Grease Spots From ...
-Magic Furniture Polish - To Sweep A Rag-Carpet
Magic Furniture Polish - Half pint alcohol, half ounce resin, half ounce gum-shellac, a few drops analine brown; let stand over night and add three-fourths pint raw linseed oil and half pint spirits ...
-Putting Away Clothes - To Clean Silver-Wake Easily
Putting Away Clothes Before putting away summer or winter clothes, mend, clean, brush, shake well, fold smoothly, sprinkle gum-camphor, on every fold, and on the bottom of trunks or closets (unless c...
-How To Preserve Books - Perpetual Paste
How To Preserve Books Bindings may be preserved from mildew7 by brushing them over with the spirits of wine. A few drops of any perfumed oil will secure libraries from the consuming effects of mold a...
-The Care Of Marble - First Course - Soup
The Care Of Marble Never wash the marble tops of wash-stands, bureaus, etc., with soap. Use clean warm water (if very much soiled add a little ammonia) and a soft cloth, drying immediately with a sof...
-Dinner - Dessert. Fifth Course - To Preserve Milk
Dinner - Dessert. Fifth Course 1. Cake. 2. Jelly. 3. Sugar. 4. Cup custard. 5. Nuts. 6. Raisins. 7. Bon bons and confectionery. 8. Fruit. 9. Pastry. 10. Spoons. 11. Nut Crackers. 12. Blanc...
-Corks - To Freshen Walnuts
Corks - When corks are too large to go into a bottle, throw them into hot water a few moments, and they will soften. Charred Casks - Water and salt meat may be preserved pure a long time if put up ...
-A Fire Kindler - Quick Vinegar
A Fire Kindler Melt together three pounds resin and a quart of tar, and stir in as much saw-dust and pulverized charcoal as possible, spread the mass on a board to cool, and break into lumps the size...
-How To Wash Preserve Jars - To Clean Coffee Or Tea-Pots
How To Wash Preserve Jars Preserve jars or bottles should be carefully washed as soon as emptied, taking care that the stoppers and covers have their share of attention. It is well to put soda or amm...
-Kitchen Utensils - Kitchen Luxuries
Kitchen Utensils The following is a list of the utensils needed in every well-furnished kitchen. Of course an ingenious housewife will make fewer do excellent service, but all these save time and lab...
-Spiral Egg Beater - Broiler And Toaster
Spiral Egg Beater This is a very useful implement in the kitchen, cheaper though not so good as the Dover, a cut of which appears elsewhere. The spiral beater does the work well, but not so easily ...
-Table Mat - Dutch Oven
Table Mat A very neat and serviceable table mat is made of white wire, as represented in cut. Nothing has been devised that is better, more durable, and at the same time so cheap. It answers the purp...
-Lemon Squeezer - A Fish-Kettle
Lemon Squeezer - In making lemonade a powerful squeezer is necessary to extract all the juice. The one here represented takes a whole lemon and cuts and crushes it at the same time. It is made of gal...
-Cake Spoon - Handled Strainer
Cake Spoon - This is a peculiar form of spoon, the spaces through the howl of which double the amount of work done by it in heating cakes, eggs, etc. Tension Chopping Knife - In this knife the blad...
-Tea Or Coffee Strainer - The Ford Dish Drain
Tea Or Coffee Strainer This is applied or detached in a moment, being held in place by a spring, as shown in cut, inserted in the spout. The strainer separates the dregs from the tea or coffee as it ...
-Bread Cooler And Roast Dripper - Meat Chopper
Bread Cooler And Roast Dripper - Every good bread maker knows that, when first removed from the oven, her fragrant loaves should be set where the air can circulate around them freely, so as to insure...
-Crown Tea Or Coffee Pot Stands - Cake Cutters
Crown Tea Or Coffee Pot Stands These are neat, simple, and perfectly adapted to the purpose, besides being very strong and durable. They are also very useful as stands for flowerpots in the house or ...
-Tea And Coffee Cans - Universal Dough Mixer And Kneader
Tea And Coffee Cans To preserve the strength of tea or coffee requires a close receptacle. Nothing is bet ter than the tin cans with close covers, japanned on the outside surface, kept for sale for t...
-Fryer And Drainer - Lid Lifters
Fryer And Drainer This invention furnishes a convenient method of frying oysters, potatoes, and other articles that when done need to be removed quickly from the boiling fat and drained, while remain...
-Gas Stoves - Cheap Toilet Table
Gas Stoves In cities where gas is used the use of gas stoves for cooking in hot weather is as a rule economical, and adds much to comfort, or rather saves much discomfort. Gas companies usually make ...
-Brush Stand - To Make A Long Mat
Brush Stand - Another toilet convenience is a white wire stand for hand and tooth brushes. It is so contrived that the brushes are kept in place and yet are always within easy and convenient reach. T...
-Tile Easels - A Blower Rack
Tile Easels - A very neat con-trivance for holding ornamented tile is an easel of white wire, and is represented in one of the accompanying cuts; in the other it bears the tile. Nothing neater or bet...
-Broom Holder - Flower Pots
Broom Holder - A place for every thing and every thing in its place applies to a brush-broom as well as to other household necessities. The neat wire-frame represented in cut is one good way of dispo...
-A Folding Table - A Child's Pen
A Folding Table A folding table is very useful in small houses, and even in large houses for many purposes. The accompanying cut represents a form which is simple, convenient, and easily made by any ...
-Substitute For Casters - Wire Flower Stand
Substitute For Casters Casters on heavy chairs, tables, bed-steads, etc., are always getting out of order, and are very destructive to carpets. A substitute, which is a vast improvement in every resp...
-Polisher And Stand - Potatoes
Polisher And Stand A small neat stand, made of coppered iron, with a surface of emery (three extra emery pads go on with each) for cleaning starch, etc., from flat irons. Tongue - Beef's tongue...
-Sago - Ham
Sago - The small white sago, called pearl, is best. Raisins should be bought in small quantities; small boxes are best. Rice - The Southern rice cooks much quicker, and is nicer than the Indian ...
-Leg Of Mutton - A New Way To Smoke Hams
Leg Of Mutton In carving a leg of mutton the best slices are obtained from the center, by cutting from 1 to 2; and some very good cuts are found on the broad end from 5 to 6. Some epicures prefer sli...
-How To Keep Lard From Molding - To Cure And Dry Beef Tongues
How To Keep Lard From Molding Use a tub that has had no tainted lard or meat in it; scour it out thoroughly with two quarts of wheat bran to four of boiling water, but use no lye or soap. Fry the lar...
-Sausage - To Salt Pork
Sausage - For ten pounds meat take five tablespoons sage, four of salt and two of pepper. Some add one tablespoon ginger, and some a little summer savory. When nicely minced, pack in jars, and treat ...
-How To Cleanse Articles Made Of White Zephyr - How To Clean Velvet
How To Cleanse Articles Made Of White Zephyr Rubin flour or magnesia, changing often. Shake off flour and hang in the open air a short time. How To Remove Ink-Stain Immediately saturate with milk, ...
-How To Take Grease Out Of Silks, Woolens, Paper, Floors, Etc - Coffee Starch
How To Take Grease Out Of Silks, Woolens, Paper, Floors, Etc Grate thick over the spot French (or common will do) chalk, cover with brown paper, set on it a hot flatiron, and let it remain until cool...
-How To Remove Iron-Rust - To Wash Thread Lace
How To Remove Iron-Rust While rinsing clothes, take such as have spots of rust, wring out, dip a wet finger in oxalic acid, and rub on the spot, then dip in salt and rub on, and hold on a warm flatir...
-How To Wash Delicate Colored Muslins - The Use Of Turpentine In Washing
How To Wash Delicate Colored Muslins Boil wheat bran (about two quarts to a dress) in soft water half an hour, let it cool, strain the liquor, and use it instead of soap-suds; it removes dirt like so...
-How To Wash Flannels In Tepid Water - To Wash Flannels In Boiling Water
How To Wash Flannels In Tepid Water The usefulness of liquid ammonia is not as universally known among housewives as it deserves to be. If you add some of it to a soap-suds made of a mild soap, it wi...
-Care Of Irons - Keeping Cabbages
Care Of Irons When irons become rough or smoky, lay a little fine salt on a flat surface and rub them well; it will prevent them sticking to any thing starched, and make them smooth; or scour with ba...
-The Temperature - Keeping Cabbages In The Country
The Temperature Vegetables keep best at as low a temperature as possible without freezing. Apples bear a very low temperature. Sweet potatoes (which keep well packed in dry forest leaves) require a d...
-Crust Coffee - Sea-Moss Farine
Crust Coffee - Toast bread very brown, pour on boiling water, strain and add cream and sugar and nutmeg, if desired. Cream Soup - One pint boiling water, half tea-cup cream; add broken pieces of to...
-Jellice - Arrowroot Custard
Jellice - One-half tea-spoon of currant, lemon or cranberry jelly put into a goblet, beat well with two table-spoons water, fill up with ice-water, and you have a refreshing drink for a fever patient...
-Cinnamon Tea - Royal Strawberry Acid
Cinnamon Tea To a half-pint fresh, new milk add stick or ground cinnamon enough to flavor, and white sugar to taste; bring to boiling point, and take either warm or cold. Excellent for diarrhoea in a...
-Strawberry Acid - Cracked Wheat Pudding
Strawberry Acid - Dissolve five ounces tartaric acid in two quarts of water, and pour it upon twelve pounds of strawberries in a porcelain kettle; let it simmer forty-eight hours; strain it, taking c...
-Broiled Beefsteak - Milk Porridge
Broiled Beefsteak - Many times a small piece of tenderloin or porterhouse is more wholesome, for an invalid, than broths and teas; and with this may be served a potato, roasted in the ashes, dres...
-Bran Biscuits - Beef Broth
Bran Biscuits - Take cup bran (as prepared by Davis & Taylor, 24 Canal Street, Boston), five cups sifted flour; scald the bran at tea-time with half pint boiling water; when cool, pour it into the mi...
-Meat For Invalids - Corn-Meal Gruel
Meat For Invalids The following method of rendering raw meat palatable to invalids is given by good authority. To 8.7 ounces of raw meat, from the loin, add 2.6 ounces shelled sweet almonds, .17 ounc...
-Boiled Flour Or Flour Ball - Fob The Hair
Boiled Flour Or Flour Ball - Take one quart good flour; tie in a pudding-bag so tightly as to make a solid mass; put into a pot of boiling water early in the morning, and let boil until bedtime; take...
-Cocoa Butter - Dandruff In The Hair
Cocoa Butter - Apply, at night, to face and hands, and wash off in the morning. This is excellent for the skin, and keeps it soft and clear. How To Clean Light Kids Put the glove on the hand, and r...
-How To Clean Jewelry - Bay Rum
How To Clean Jewelry Any gold jewelry that an immersion in water will not injure, can be beautifully cleaned by shaking it well in a bottle nearly full of warm soap-suds to which a little prepared ch...
-Superfluous Hairs - Are Best Left Alone - Teeth
Superfluous Hairs - Are Best Left Alone Shaving only increases the strength of the hair, and all depilatories are dangerous and sometimes disfigure the face. The only sure plan is to spread on a piec...
-Collars That Do Not Fit - Coarse And Stippled Skin
Collars That Do Not Fit Few gentlemen have philosophy enough to endure an ill-fitting collar with patience, but not many understand why they do not fit. The fact is, the laundress stretches them the ...
-For The Complexion - Fracture
For The Complexion If ladies will use any thing, the following are the best and most harmless: Blanch one-fourth pound best Jordan almonds, slip off the skin, mash in a mortar, and rub together with ...
-Swallowing Pieces Of Broken Glass, Pins, Etc - Burning-Houses
Swallowing Pieces Of Broken Glass, Pins, Etc - By no means take a purgative. Rather partake freely of suet pudding, or any solid farinaceous food, and it is possible that both may pass away together ...
-Foreign Bodies In The Ear - Ivies
Foreign Bodies In The Ear - Take the head of the child between the knees, face downward, and inject a stream of warm water into the ear, holding the nozzle of the syringe outside, so as to allow the ...
-How To Keep Plants Without A Fire At Night - Scarlet For Wool
How To Keep Plants Without A Fire At Night Have made of wood or zinc a tray about four inches deep, with a handle on either end, water-tight - paint it outside and in, put in each corner a post as hi...
-Scarlet Spirit - Pink Dye For Wool
Scarlet Spirit - Two pounds muriatic acid (22 B.), two ounces feathered tin, and one-fourth pound water. Place acid in a stoneware jar, add the tin, let it dissolve, and keep a few days before u...
-Orange Dye - Pink Dye For Cotton
Orange Dye For ten pounds of goods, use argal ten ounces, muriate of tin two gills; boil, and dip one hour; then add to the dye, fustic five pounds, madder one pint, and dip again forty minutes. If p...
-Yellow On Silk - Mulberry On Silk
Yellow On Silk For ten pounds goods, use sugar of lead seven and a half ounces, alum two pounds; enter the goods, and let them remain twelve hours; remove them, drain, and make a new dye with fustic ...
-Green Dye On Wool And Silk - Lime Water For Dyers' Use
Green Dye On Wool And Silk Equal quantities of yellow oak and hickory bark; make a strong yellow bath by boiling; shade to the desired tint, by adding a small quantity of extract of indigo. Orange D...
-Aniline Green On Silk - Aniline Violet And Purple
Aniline Green On Silk - Iodine green, or night green, dissolves easily in warm water. For a liquid dye, one pound may be dissolved in one gallon alcohol, and mixed with two gallons water containing o...
-Aniline Black For Dyeing - To Clean Ostrich Feathers
Aniline Black For Dyeing - Water twenty to thirty parts, chlorate of potassa one part, sal-ammoniac one part, chloride of copper one part, aniline hydrochloric acid one part, previously mixed togethe...
-Bleaching Straw Goods - Dyes For Furs
Bleaching Straw Goods - Straw is bleached by simply exposing it in a closed chamber to the fumes of burning sulphur - an old flour barrel is the apparatus most used for the purpose by milliners, a fl...
-How To Raise A Nap On Cloth - A Good Black For Cotton
How To Raise A Nap On Cloth Clean the article well; soak it in cold water for half an hour; put it on a board, and rub the thread-bare parts with a half-worn hatter's card filled with flocks, or with...
-How To Dye Blue - For Rheumatism
How To Dye Blue A very beautiful blue may be produced in an hour by the following process: For each pound of material take two and a half ounces of alum and one and a half of cream tartar. Boil the...
-How To Stop Bleeding - For Burns Or Bruises
How To Stop Bleeding Apply wet tea-leaves, or scrapings of sole-leather to a fresh cut and it will stop the bleeding, or apply a paste of flour and vinegar. How To Stop Bleeding At The Nose Bathe t...
-Salve For Cuts And Burns - To Relieve Toothache
Salve For Cuts And Burns To one-half pound of sweet lard add one-fourth pound of beeswax and the same of resin; beat all together till well mixed; pour in a little tin box. Apply a little to the woun...
-For Cold In The Head - Eye Wash
For Cold In The Head As soon as you feel that you have a cold in the head, put a tea-spoonful of sugar in a goblet, and on it put six drops of camphor, stir it, and fill the glass half full of water;...
-Conklin's Salve - Catarrh
Conklin's Salve - One pound of resin, two ounces mutton tallow, one of beeswax, one-half gill alcoholic spirits, add a little of the gum of balsam; boil all together slowly, until it has done rising ...
-Blisters For Diphtheria - Cubeb Berries For Catarrh
Blisters For Diphtheria The method of treating that form of pulmonary consumption which consists in ulceration in the substance of the lungs, by means of blisters on the chest, and thus giving an art...
-Sure Cure For Croup - For A Cough
Sure Cure For Croup - Boil pigs' feet in water, without salt, and let it stand over night; in the morning skim off the fat (which will be formed in a cake on top), put in a tin pan, boil until all wa...
-Light Suppers - Cure Of Croup
Light Suppers - Give the whole family light suppers and send the children early to bed, Cure for Lock-jaw, said to be positive, - Let any one who has an attack of lock-jaw take a small quantity of s...
-How To Cure A Felon - For Weak Eyes
How To Cure A Felon Take a pint of common soft soap and stir in air slacked lime till it is of the consistency of glazier's putty. Make a leather thimble, fill it with this composition and insert the...
-How To Harden Nipples - Golden Ointment
How To Harden Nipples Bathe with a preparation of one-half ounce liquid tannin and two ounces glycerine, for three or four months before confinement, once or twice a day. For Sore Nipples Bathe in ...
-Chronic Inflammation Of The Stomach - Change Of Climate
Chronic Inflammation Of The Stomach - This is known by a pain in the stomach, increased by the presence of food, by belching up gas, by vomiting, fickle appetite, seasons of thirst, tongue white in t...
-Children's Beds - To Clean Wells Of Foul Air
Children's Beds - No two children should sleep in the same bed. They will have better health and thrive better to sleep by themselves. For Ivy Poison Apply sweet-oil. Rust In Iron Kerosene-oil wi...
-Dirty Coat-Collars - To Make Old Varnish Dry
Dirty Coat-Collars - Apply benzine, and, after an hour or more, when the grease has become softened, rub it or remove with soap-suds. To Clean Kettles easily, pour a little hot water in them and put...
-Discolorations On Custard Cups - Shellac Varnish
Discolorations On Custard Cups To take the brown discolorations off of cups in which custards are baked: Rub with damp flannel dipped in best whiting. Scouring sand or sand soap will answer the purpo...
-How To Prevent Pumps From Freezing - A Good Paste
How To Prevent Pumps From Freezing Take out the lower valve in the fall, and drive a tack under it, projecting in such a way that it can not quite close. The water will then leak back into the well o...
-Piece-Bags - Bologna Sausage
Piece-Bags White cotton piece-bags hung in the linen closet are a great convenience; have them made with a string to draw from both sides; mark in large letters in indelible ink, Merino and Cloth,...
-Lime-Water And Its Uses - To Remove Rust From A Stovepipe
Lime-Water And Its Uses Place a piece of unslaked lime (size is immaterial, as the water will take up only a certain quantity) in a perfectly clean bottle, and fill with cold water; keep corked in a ...
-How To Cure A Kicking Cow - To Extract Oil From Marble Or Stone
How To Cure A Kicking Cow Take a strap an inch wide and buckle tight around each hind leg, just above the hock; tight enough to slightly compress the ham-string. Then she can not kick. In fly time ta...
-Cows And Turnips - To Make Hens Lay In Winter
Cows And Turnips To prevent the Odor and flavor of turnips from appearing in the milk, feed while milking, and the flavor will have disappeared before the next milking. With this precaution, feeding ...









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