A Corporation whose Entire Income is Devoted to Furthering Its Ideals - Thirty Valuable Scholarships and Many Local Exhibitions for Competition - Scale of Fees - Curriculum of Study

Trinity College of Music was founded in 1872 as a voluntary society, and incorporated in 1875, when the curriculum was enlarged from singing classes and theory classes to include all musical subjects. The original scheme of higher examinations has been working since 1874, and now more than 25,000 candidates enter every year for its examinations. This proves how much such institutions were needed. Trinity College was the first to establish anything of the kind. There are over 300 local centres in connection with the college scattered over the United Kingdom, the Colonies, and India. The entire income of the college is applied to the promotion of its objects, none being spent in dividends or other forms of profit to the corporation by which it is ruled.

The Governing Body

The college provides complete and systematic instruction in all musical subjects, the year being divided into three terms of twelve weeks each. It is ruled by a president, a group of vice-presidents, numbering some of the most distinguished musicians in England, a corporation of professors and composers, a college board, and various honorary administrative officials. The examiners are also a very distinguished group.

In addition, there are twelve honorary fellowships, conferred upon "the most distinguished among those who have devoted themselves to the science or practice of music in this country," and a like number are held by "persons distinguished in literature, science, or art."

The Buildings

The college occupies a handsome building in Mandeville Place, a very central position close to Oxford Street, and within a few minutes' walk of Baker Street station.

There is no entrance or registration fee, but all fees for lessons must be paid in advance. Students may enter between the opening and the middle of term for the remaining lessons; after half-term they can enter for not fewer than six lessons.

There is evening instruction for the convenience of those who are occupied in the daytime.

There is no entrance examination, but the student is required to play or sing before the principal previous to entering on a course, in order to show what proficiency may already exist.

How To Join

The student should send for a candidate's form of application. There is no age limit, except for the junior school, for which students must be under fifteen. An inter-w with the principal is required, at which the student may choose her professor - subject, of course, to the convenience of the college.

The director of studies advises students in all matters concerning their studies, also as to preparing and entering for examinations, or any of the thirty valuable scholarships which the college offers.

Students' concerts are frequently given. There is a magnificent organ at the college.

After three years' consecutive study at the college, a student may enter for the higher examination for associate or licentiate without paying an entrance fee.

Refreshments are available at moderate charges, and a matron is in daily attendance. The reference and lending library of the college is open to students. There are also six houses of residence in connection with the college.

Scholarships

The scholarships provide free instruction, and in cases of exceptional talent a grant, not exceeding 50 a year, is made towards maintenance. The scholarships are open to all British subjects of either sex under the age of 21.

The examination for singing or playing consists of the performance of two or more classical pieces or songs, reading at sight, and answering viva voce questions. All candidates, except students of the college, must obtain a satisfactory certificate of moral character from some responsible person.

Scholars are expected to pass the college higher examinations in due course, but no fees are asked of them. They must attend classes at the discretion of the board, and may on no account without permission attend any other institution, nor perform any composition without the necessary sanction.

Each winner of a scholarship must undertake to abide by the rules of the college, and to take the full period of the scholarship, unless prevented by illness or other unavoidable cause; and this undertaking must be signed by a responsible person.

In addition to the thirty scholarships, fifty local exhibitions in practical music and twelve in theory are annually awarded, tenable at local centres, of 9 9s., 6 6s., or 3 3s. each. There are also five prizes to be competed for.

The Examinations

The examinations range from those for which beginners enter to those which confer a coveted diploma on the would-be teacher.

The very interesting calendar published annually by the college gives in full the examination papers of the previous year, thus enabling a would-be candidate to estimate what will be required and for which examination he (or she) is best fitted,

A Table Showing Fees

The fees are, per term:

Individual Weekly Lessons

Class Lessons

If taken as additional subject

S.

d

S.

d.

S

d.

Harmony, counterpoint, orchestration, composition, scoring, etc

I

11

6

1

1

0

-

Musical elements and dictation...........

I

11

6

10

6

-

Pianoforte.................

3

3

0

-

2

12

6

Pianoforte technique (practice free).............

2

2

0

15

0

-

Solo singing and voice production...........

3

3

0

-

2

12

6

Organ (practice, 6d. per hour............

3

3

0

-

2

12

6

School of Church music (including work in London churches; full course Anglican and

Roman.............

21

0

o

per annum, articled pupils.

Violin and viola.............

3

3

0

-

2

12

6

'cello, double bass, wine instruments, drum, musical history, etc ..

3

3

0

-

2

12

6

Art of teaching

1

11

6

Lectures:

1

1

0

Supplementary Classes

There are also supplementary classes in light opera, choir, orchestra, sight singing, elocution, etc., fees for which vary from 2s. 6d. to 4 4s. per term.

A complete professional course may be had for 9 9s. per term, including two instrumental or vocal lessons of thirty minutes each per week, one thirty-minute lesson in secondary subject, and the various other branches of musical knowledge necessary to the would-be teacher or professional musician.

Supplementary Classes 1001164