s.

d.

Three silk and wool-woven shirts ................................

4

10 1/2

Three nightgowns...........................................................

5

10 1/2

Three monthly gowns......................................................

8

10 1/2

Three night flannels.........................................................

7

6

Three day flannels...........................................................

8

10 1/2

Three flannel binders ......

2

0

One dozen Turkish towelettes (best)............................

5

11

One dozen Turkish towelettes.....................................

3

11 1/2

Two flannel pilches........

2

1

One mackintosh pilch.....................................................

1

2 1/2

One flannel head square.................................................

2

11 1/2

One good cashmere carrying cloak ..............................

18

11

One embroidered hood to match...................................

4

11

One trimmed table basket for baby...............................

9

11

Fittings for basket - brush, powder, etc............................................................................

6

2 1/2

One best embroidered indoor robe ..............................

10

11

5

5

0

Eight best shirts, at Is IId...........

0

15

4

Three flannel binders...........

0

3

2

Three cotton swathes..........

0

2

2

Six nightgowns, at 4s. 3d. .. ..

1

5

6

Six monthly gowns, at 5s. IId. .......

1

15

6

Six night flannels, at 3s. 3d.

0

19

6

Six day flannels, at 5s. IId.....

1

15

6

Four flannel pilches, at Is. o 1/2d. ............

0

4

2

One mackintosh pilch......

0

2

0

Six long petticoats, at 4s. 9d.

1

8

6

One had flannel...............

0

10

0

Four pairs bootees, at 9d.....

0

3

0

Two dozen Turkish squares, at

6s. IId..........

0

13

10

One dozen Turkish towels.....

0

8

11

One best robe..............

1

5

6

One cashmere cloak...............

2

10

0

One hood to match...............

0

10

6

Three bibs................

0

6

11

15

0

0

Baby's first clothes consist of, first, a swathe, or binder, which is simply a strip of white flannel about 5 inches wide by 18 inches long. The edges are left unbound. 11 should wrap loosely, but firmly, round the little body one and a half times, the double thickness coming over the abdomen, where it is either secured by a few stitches or small safety pins. The flannel binder is replaced later by a knitted or woven wool one.

The Vest Or Shirt

The vest, or shirt, may be knitted at home of softest white wool, or made of very soft white flannel, or it can be bought quite cheaply. The bought shirts are generally woven wool, or, better still, silk and wool. This garment should be high-necked, and if for winter, should have long sleeves. It should be double-breasted, and made to fasten over to the left side with tapes. (See illustration No. 1.)

The Vest Or Shirt 100499

Fig. 1

First little vest of silk and wool

Waist

1/2 of

Length

=

8

ins.

Width

=

12 1/2

,, ,,

Armhole

=

5

,,

Neck

=

4

,,

Sleeve

1/2 width

Head of Sleeve

=

5

ins

Wrist

=

4

,,

Length

Top fold „

=

7 1/2

,,

Seam

=

6

,,

Fig. No. 2 Barracoat, with long sleeves

Fig. No. 2 Barracoat, with long sleeves

The Long Flannel, Or Barracoat

The long flannel, or barracoat, should be made of soft, fine white 'flannel, usually taking about one and a quarter yards. It is, as a rule, made about 30 to 32 inches long, as are all the first long clothes. (See illustration No. 2.)

If a sleeved vest be worn, sleeves are not necessary; but if the baby has short-sleeved vests, then sleeves should be made to the long flannel. It should be cut with a bodice high in the neck, and with shoulder seams. The newest form has little tabs attached to the union of the waist and skirt part, inside and at the back, to which the pilch can be fastened with safety-pins. This prevents the pilch and napkin from slipping down. (See illustration No. 3.)

Fig. 3 Barracoat open, showing the arrangement of tabs and pins

Fig. 3 Barracoat open, showing the arrangement of tabs and pins

The skirt part is made long enough to come down over baby's feet, and is usually-doubled up loosely and safety-pinned.

The garment should be made double-breasted, and to fasten over to the left side with tapes.

The Day Gown, Or Robe

The day-gown, or robe, usually is made about 32 inches long. Various materials may be used. For summer, fine cambric, nainsook, or lawn or silk. For winter, fine woollen material, nuns'-veiling, fine white wincey, fine cashmere, or washing silk. The making or buying of this garment for baby leaves much scope for individual taste, and no one grudges the lovely work put on it. It may, if of woollen material, be embroidered in white silk on yoke, sleeves, and skirt. If of silk, it can be delightfully smocked; or if of any of the summer materials, may be daintily embroidered, or trimmed with finest good lace.

Skirt

Length = 24 ins. Width = 36 - 40 ins.