Although she is now partner with Sir Charles Wyndham in the proprietorship of the Cri-terion, Wyndham's, and the New Theatres, this talented actress (who is the widow of the late James Albery, a well-known dramatic author) began her career at the bottom of the ladder. A Londoner born, Miss Moore, after being educated at Warwick Hall, Maida Hill, where she gained prizes for the ability with which she acted parts both in German and English plays, determined on a stage career. But although her husband, whom she had married at the age of sixteen, and who was the author of "Pink Dominoes" and other popular plays, introduced her to sundry London managers, they one and all excused themselves on the ground that her powers were untried and her capabilities unknown. Mrs. Bronson Howard, the sister of Sir Charles Wyndham, however, induced him to give Miss Moore an engagement in the first "Candidate "touring company he sent out, and such was her success that, when he himself opened with the "Candidate" at Liverpool, he sent for Miss Moore to play Lady Oldacre with him. This was in 1885, and the following year she scored her first London success as Lady Amaranthe in "Wild Oats." Shortly afterwards Sir Charles revived "David Garrick" at the Criterion, with himself in the title role, while the part of Ada Ingot was represented by Miss Moore. The piece was an enormous success owing to the powerful manner in which the leading parts were played. Since then Miss Moore has scored many successes, amongst her best stage portraits being Lottie in "Two Roses," Susan in "The Case of Rebellious Susan," Lady Jessica in "The Liars," and Mrs. Gorringe in "Mrs. Gorringe's Necklace."

Miss Mary Moore Dover Street Studios

Miss Mary Moore Dover Street Studios