Fig. 14

The leaves, or loops, must now be supported by wire.

Hem each leaf very neatly, and leave the hem sufficiently wide to allow the wire to pass. Push wire through the hem.

Practical Millinery Fur as a Season s Trimming 100766

Fig 15

Fig. 15

Sew the fur round each leaf, remembering to take up only the extreme edge of the fur.

The leaves are now ready, and we come to the most difficult part of the task, which is to put the leaves artistically together so as to form a rosette. It is almost impossible to describe how to do this, for the result depends on the worker's own discretion and taste.

Commence by taking a small piece of stiff net or buckram, or anything stiff in black (if black lace is used), cut out a circle 4 inches in diameter.

Buttonhole-stitch the wire round, or double lace wire could be used if no ordinary wire is obtainable (see Fig. 15).

It is as well to remember exactly how to make these rounds, as they are continually being required for trimming. The technical term for them in millinery is "ears," and the modiste uses them as a foundation for mounting and supporting feathers, bows, flowers, etc.; but this is a point requiring special skill.

Practical Millinery Fur as a Season s Trimming 100767

Fig. 16

Practical Millinery Fur as a Season s Trimming 100768

Fig. 17

Pleat one of the leaves at foot with thumb and forefinger, and sew on to the edge of an ear, one inch down.

Practical Millinery Fur as a Season s Trimming 100769

Fig. 18

Sew five leaves round the outer circle of this ear, each pleated in the same way.

The remaining three leaves are to be used for filling in the centre, and here again individual taste is the worker's guide.

Fig. 19. The hat complete

Fig. 19. The hat complete

Fig. 19 illustrates the rosette completed, with a small piece of fur, or a cabuchon ornament, placed in the centre to finish it off neatly, and sewn in position on the hat.

The edge of each leaf is straight, but the wire can be bent and curved according to taste, to render the effect as artistic as possible.

The many Uses and Value of Real Lace Scarves   An ideal Wedding Present   Such Scarves may be

The many Uses and Value of Real Lace Scarves - An ideal Wedding Present - Such Scarves may be

Worn on the Shoulders, as Fichus, as Mantillas, or as Hoods

Among those dainty dress accessories which are always graceful and never out of date, long scarves of filmy lace must hold a place of honour. Many a portrait painter owes to them a deep debt of gratitude, for they have come to his aid times without number, softening the angles in some instances, and in others concealing an exuberance of outline with equal amiability.

For wearers of all ages, too, the lace scarf can be successfully adapted, since it may serve appropriately as a baby's christening veil or as a head-dress for baby's grandmother, who will be well advised to bring the long ends round under her chin, and to fasten them with some quaint old-world brooch set possibly with garnets and seed pearls.

A long and fairly wide scarf of fine real lace is a possession of which any woman may be proud. In the present, for her own use it has infinite possibilities, and in the future she likes to think that it will be handed down as an heirloom for generations to come.

When, therefore, rich aunts and fairy godmothers are debating as to their choice of wedding presents, let them always remember that a long lace scarf makes an ideal gift, and that even if the bride receives two or three such scarves, she will easily be able to find a good use for them.

It is not within everybody's means, of course, to purchase long scarves of fine real lace, but excellent imitation laces can be procured nowadays, especially in Limerick and Mechlin patterns, which are almost as effective as the real thing, and easily within reach of the most modest purse. Our sketches give some picturesque suggestions for the arrangement of a Mechlin lace scarf measuring about two and a half yards in length by fifteen or sixteen inches in width. No matter how the scarf is arranged, the lace itself will be left intact, and will not need to be cut or damaged in the slightest degree.

Old English lace scarf of early 19th century work. The Brussels ornament above the scarf is intended to serve as an end for narrow muslin scarf

Old English lace scarf of early 19th century work. The Brussels ornament above the scarf is intended to serve as an end for narrow muslin scarf

As a Fichu

One of the most becoming ways in which to wear a long lace scarf is to drape it lightly round the shoulders, and to allow the long ends to fall on to the front of the skirt. The folds give width to the shoulders, and make the waist appear small by contrast; while the cascaded draperies, coming to a fine point, give length and elegance to the figure. The black velvet bow which holds the folds together at the waist lends a touch of distinction to the fichu.

In the case of youthful wearers, a single rose might be substituted for this velvet bow, and the folds of the fichu might be caught together higher or lower to suit the figure of the wearer. It is a pretty idea, too, to catch up the lace with a velvet bow in the centre of the back, thus giving that cape effect that is always becoming.

As a Shoulder Scarf

The figure, of which a back view is given, shows a simple but graceful way in which a lace scarf may be used to give a finishing touch to a simple evening gown. Considerable care is needed to drape the folds lightly but securely round the shoulders, and it is a good plan to fasten the scarf to the bodice on one side with quite a small brooch or jewelled pin, so that there shall be no risk of losing it in a crowded room; but this must be arranged very carefully, or it may tear the lace. As a variation of this arrangement the scarf may be folded in two, lengthwise, and the folds caught together with a few firm stitches at a distance of about half a yard from the end. When the scarf is draped round the shoulders, this will give a burnous effect, with a pointed hood of lace. The point might be weighted with a gold or silver tassel, which can easily be removed when the wearer wishes to arrange her scarf in a different way.

As a Hood

A lace scarf makes an ideal evening hood, as it gives a surprising amount of warmth, and its

Dress light weight will not damage the most elaborate coiffure. A sketch is given of a very becoming hood of this kind, which can be quite simply arranged by folding the scarf in the centre, and then using it with the double lace, draping it once round the head and securing it at the side with a safety hook and eye. This fastening is entirely hidden by a cluster of roses, a picturesque touch which adds greatly to the charm of the hood. Other flowers might be substituted to suit the rest of the toilette, or a bow of velvet or ribbon might be used instead.

As a Mantilla

A more fanciful arrangement of a scarf in the shape of a mantilla is the subject of our last remarks, and for a drapery of this kind, Spanish lace, either white or black, is most appropriate. The folds of lace are doubled in this case also, and draped round the head, where they must be lightly pinned to the hair behind a tall Spanish comb of dark tortoiseshell. The long lace ends are then brought across the front of the bodice and taken lightly over the shoulder, so that they fall gracefully on to the back of the skirt.

A Mechlin lace scarf worn as a fichu. This is a most becoming style in which to wear a scarf

A Mechlin lace scarf worn as a fichu. This is a most becoming style in which to wear a scarf

This way of wearing a scarf is becoming to every age and figure, but perhaps more particularly is it suited to the tall, graceful brunette, on whom it looks peculiarly "at home." The hair, of course, should be carefully dressed in order that the comb may be in the correct position for the mantilla to hang in graceful folds, or the effact is lost.

The following are good firms for supplying materials, etc, mentioned in this Section: Messrs. Clark & Co. (Dyeing and Cleaning); Grenfell, Frazier Co. (Jewellery); Horrochses' i Longcloths and Sheetings, Wholesale only); london Glove Co. (Gloves); J. H. U. Dawson. Ltd. (Stork Baby Pants).

The scarf used as an evening hood.

The scarf used as an evening hood.

Such a wrap will not disarrange an elaborate coiffure

The lace worn as a shoulder scarf. This mode lends a charming finishing touch to an evening gown

The lace worn as a shoulder scarf. This mode lends a charming finishing touch to an evening gown