Apart from such considerations as convenience for shopping, proximity to a railway-station, pleasant surroundings, and questions determined by the choice or special needs of the prospective tenant, the site of the house should be examined as to those natural features which make for health and comfort.

to situation - e.g., shelter from the boisterous winds and driving rain, which in our climate come mostly from the south-west, and from the cold and cutting winds of spring, which usually blow from the north, north-east, and east.

Site involves certain conditions attaching Shelter may consist of trees, adjacent buildings, or high ground.

Ideal situation for a detached house. Aspect N., site sloping slightly to S. Shelter from S.w., E., and N.e. winds. Gravel subsoil

Ideal situation for a detached house. Aspect N., site sloping slightly to S. Shelter from S.w., E., and N.e. winds. Gravel subsoil

An ideal site for a country house should be open to the south, with a slight slope in that direction; partly sheltered on the south-west, and more fully sheltered on the north, north-east, and east.

Excess of shelter implies stagnation of air. The cottage in the wood may be attractive by reason of its picturesque situation, but usually is unhealthy and gloomy indoors.

Individual tastes have to be considered, and affect the choice of situation. Seclusion is a valuable feature if attained without the sacrifice of fresh air and a pleasant outlook.

Another point is warmth and dryness, which is intimately connected with the nature of the soil and subsoil.

Houses on a hillside or on high ground are preferable to those at a lower level. Sir Douglas Galton condemns all sites situated at the foot of a slope and in deep valleys, pointing out that they receive the surface drainage from the higher ground, and predispose their occupants to epidemic diseases. High positions exposed to strong winds may be unhealthy if situated to leeward of marshy ground or the contaminated air of a manufacturing town.

Two other points are worthy of consideration - viz., rainfall and mortality. Rainfall within the British Isles varies from 25 inches per annum in the Eastern counties to 80 inches in the West of Scotland, and though this great variation does not appear to affect the health returns, it certainly has a very real effect upon the comfort of the individual.

The death-rate is an infallible indication of the healthiness of a district, even when we eliminate the high mortality due to local conditions of employment.