Length of Material Required-lining-measurements to be Taken-cutting Out the Wrap from the Bodice Pattern-turnings to be Allowed

The wrap illustrated in the finished sketch is suitable for either day or evening wear, according to the material of which it is made.

Six and three-quarter yards Of material 27 inches wide will be required for a wrap measuring about one and a half yards from the neck point of the shoulder to the bottom, or, 3 3/4 yards of material 54 inches wide.

The same amount of silk or satin for the lining, about 4 yards of single-width satin to make the trimming, and half a yard of velvet (this can be bought on the straight) for the revers.

The design for the trimming and full instructions for tracing it on the material will be given in a future lesson-when the wrap is ready to be trimmed-which will be before the lining is put in. Before commencing to cut it out (from the bodice pattern) the length desired for the wrap should be taken from the neck point of the shoulder of the person for whom it is to be made.

The measure round the hips (seven inches below the waist) must also be taken. This measure must be taken loosely, and both should be written down for future reference.

If the material is single width (27 inches wide) the wrap must be made with a seam down the back.

Fold the material in half -wrong side out-the cut edges together, place it flat on the table, and pin it together.

From the cut edge measure along the selvedge the length the wrap is to be, plus two inches for turnings, make a chalk mark, and, with a square, draw a line lightly with the chalk across the material, from one selvedge to the other.

This line denotes the position for the front shoulder, and is marked on the diagram "shoulder line."

Place and pin the "front" of the bodice pattern on the material in the position

Finished sketch of wrap shown in Diagram 1, with the neck point of the shoulder touching the  shoulder line,  and the  front  straight down about one inch from the selvedge.

Finished sketch of wrap shown in Diagram 1, with the neck point of the shoulder touching the "shoulder line," and the "front" straight down about one inch from the selvedge.

Place and pin the "side front" about an inch from the "front," in the position shown in the diagram.

From the armhole measure down the "under-arm seam " three inches, and make a chalk mark. Take the larger piece of the sleeve pattern, place and pin it in the position shown in the diagram-i.e., with the top of the inside seam at the chalk mark just made. Place and pin the pattern of the back near the selvedge, and two inches from the "shoulder line," as shown in the diagram.

N.B.-If the material is silk, satin, or any delicate fabric, fine steel pins or needles should be used for pinning.

Lightly mark a "hip line" on the material seven inches below the " waist line," from the front of the bodice pattern to the "under-arm seam."

Add three inches to the measure which was taken round the hips, and then divide it into quarters-e.g., if the hip measurement was 41 inches and three inches were added, a quarter would be 11 inches. Measure from the front of the bodice pattern along the "hip line" these 11 inches, and make a mark. N.b.-this mark gives the position for the " side seam."

From the selvedge at the cut edge measure 23 1/2 inches (or more if desired) for the width of the bottom of the front; make a mark, and from it, draw with the square a slanting line to the mark on the "hip line."

Outline the inner seam of the sleeve pattern, curve it under the arm at about 4 inches from the " under-arm seam," and with a square draw a slanting line to the "hip line" to compete the "side seam." Measure the length of the front (at the

Diagram 1. The bodice pattern placed in position for cutting out the wrap

Diagram 1. The bodice pattern placed in position for cutting out the wrap selvedge) from the "hip line" to the "cut edge," measure the same length from the "hip line" on the " side seam," make a mark, and draw a curved line to the selvedge, for the bottom of the front, as shown in the diagram.

From the "shoulder line" measure on the selvedge near the front about 10 inches, make a mark, and from it draw a slanting line towards the "front shoulder," curving it gradually round to the back neck of the bodice pattern, and outlining it to the selvedge.

The front can now be cut out. It will be remembered that two inches were allowed for turnings at the bottom; it can therefore be cut out on the curved line, but turnings of about one inch must be allowed up the "side seam" and on the "inner seam" of the sleeve to the selvedge, as shown in the diagram. It will be seen that the material is not wide enough; a piece will therefore have to be joined to complete the length of the sleeve later on.

Take out the pins and remove the bodice and sleeve patterns from the material. Take out the pins that hold the two folds of material together, separate them, take the upper one (on which the "shoulder line" is marked) and fold it together along the "shoulder line."

N.B.-This must be done very carefully and accurately.

Place this folded piece smoothly on the table with the front (which has been cut out) uppermost, and pin it together, the selvedges level, and cut out the under fold by the upper one, along the bottom, up the "side seam," and along the "inner seam" of the sleeve to the selvedge.

N.B.-On no account must the fold along the "shoulder line" be cut.

Take out the pins, open out the material, and cut round the line at the neck, allowing about half an inch for turning.

The long piece of material should now appear as in Diagram 2.

N.B.-To prevent any possibility of the neck stretching in handling so large a piece of work, it is a good plan for an amateur to make a row of small running stitches round the line at the neck, before cutting it out, drawing the thread rather tightly before fastening it off.

To cut the second half of the wrap, place the remaining piece of the material-single-right side uppermost, on the table, and on it place the half wrap, wrong side uppermost, so that the right sides "face," pin them carefully together, and cut out the under half by the upper. The pieces to be joined on to complete the sleeves, the cuffs, and sleeve-bands, must be cut out of the remaining pieces of the material. It is better for an amateur to cut paper patterns for the cuffs, etc.

To cut the pattern for the sleeve piece, measure the length of the selvedge (on the sleeve of the wrap) where the piece is to be joined, and cut a strip of paper the same length and six inches wide, fold it in half, and draw a line curving gradually from the fold to the end; cut on this line through the double paper, unfold it, and the shape should appear as in Diagram 3.

To be continued.

The following are good firms for supplying materials, etc., mentioned in this Section: Messrs. The Acta Corset Co. ("Acta" Corsets); Clark & Co. (Dyeing and Cleaning).

Diagram 2. As the wrap should appear when cut

Diagram 2. As the wrap should appear when cut