How to Arrange Artificial Flowers in Posies-some Mixed Posies-a Rose Osprey-the Flower Fan-a Forget-me'not Buckle-lace and Flower Quills

Spring millinery generally precedes Nature in its blossoming forth into many coloured flowers. A discreetly arranged little posy of blooms very often form a sufficient trimming for a new toque, or will give that- touch of freshness to a last year's model which will make it pass among the uninitiated as a new purchase. To make up a posy that has a professional air one needs, first of all, some fine green-covered wire, three yards of which can be bought for id. Uncovered wire is sure to slip, unless of the very finest make, and cotton, which the amateur is prone to think will "do," is useless as a substitute.

Then the flowers must be arranged in a neat and compact fashion, or they will begin to look untidy at once.

The tiny monthly roses, for instance, should never straggle out of the posy so as to show their stalks, but lie flat against the hat.

Flowers should not be mixed except in the case where several different kinds are employed to form a regular

" mixed bunch."

The favourite and most successful blossoms for these posies are roses and forget-me-nots. Violets, p a n s i e s , daisies, and cornflowers can, however,

A lovely half wreath of blush roses with their own foliage. This is a suitable trimming for the summer hat be used with good effect, and sometimes little touches of wallflower are introduced.

A lovely half wreath of blush roses with their own foliage. This is a suitable trimming for the summer hat be used with good effect, and sometimes little touches of wallflower are introduced.

A charming colour scheme is in a knot of dark red rosebuds surrounded by tiny little roses in a pale vieux rose shade. The wee fully-blown monthly roses are also delightful. These can be bought for 6 3/4d. the packet. A particularly smart posy is contrived with three of these in a dark red shade in the centre, about eight in pink and cerise tones around them, with the outer circle of all composed of a single row of rather bright blue forget-me-nots, also at 6|d. the packet. Four of these could be placed at intervals around the crown of a hat, or a single one would probably be enough for a toque.

As a rule, it looks smarter not to have an outer rim of leaves, the moss that is attached to these little roses giving all the touch of green that is necessary. With violets, however, leaves are generally an improvement, as the blossoms are apt to look insipid without a touch of green. A dull rose-coloured rose, or one in pink, or dark red, surrounded by violets, looks delightful.

The difficulty in the arrangement of a mixed bouquet is that flowers are generally sold in large packets, and so some are wasted. Sometimes the worker may have a few odd blossoms lying by that can be used, though if the edges are the least frayed they must first be cut carefully with scissors. A very attractive mixed bunch can be made by combining a packet of three mauve and yellow velvet pansies at 4 3/4d. the packet, a packet of bright Royal blue forget-me-nots at 6 3/4 d. and a fullblown crushed white rose at 3d. This posy harmonises admirably with the putty-coloured tagel straw that is so becoming. A couple of red roses packed in blue corncockles look well, and suitably illustrate one of the most popular combinations of colour in Paris. Scarlet poppies

A rosette formed of a full blown white rose with pansies and forget meĽnots is a useful addition to summer millinery and cornflowers also appear to advantage on a blue tagel toque.

A rosette formed of a full-blown white rose with pansies and forget-me»nots is a useful addition to summer millinery and cornflowers also appear to advantage on a blue tagel toque.

With regard to the actual making up of the bunch, the wire should not be used sparingly. It should be wound around tightly, and the loose end be secured firmly by being wound in and out among the stalks. The stalks must be cut off quite short, and, to make the task complete, should be covered with a little piece of green sarcenet ribbon wound round and round and sewn at the end.

The ambitious amateur, doubtless, will attempt something of a more aspiring character than these simple little bunches. A new floral decoration is the rose osprey. This is mounted on a piece of thick silk-covered wire. Roses in varying shades should be chosen for it, and

Flowers used as a frame for a piece of tambour lace stretched on wire is an ornament which will give a note of distinction to a good tagel straw hat the paler ones put at the top

Flowers used as a frame for a piece of tambour lace stretched on wire is an ornament which will give a note of distinction to a good tagel straw hat the paler ones put at the top. Right at the tip there should be one or two tiny leaves and buds. After the roses have been secured to the upright wire, the back is made neat by a row of small leaves wired in position down it, one overlapping the other. This should be accompanied by a loose spray of leaves and buds. A fan-shaped ornament may be placed against each side of the crown of some hats, or catching back the brim of a toque. This ornament needs mounting on millinery net, made up in the form of an arrow-head, and edged with very fine wire, so that it will bend easily into shape. Along the top edge of this a row of medium-sized rose-leaves should be sewn. At the base of these is a double row of tiny pale pink roses, then a

Fan shaped ornament or rosebuds and leaves suitable for catching the brim of a toque to the crown

Fan-shaped ornament or rosebuds and leaves suitable for catching the brim of a toque to the crown. It is mounted on wire row of smaller leaves and a row of pale blue forget-me-nots. Below these again are more small leaves, and, right at the tip, a bunch of the wee pink roses.

A flower buckle is'quite expensive to buy, but can be made for a little over a shilling. For this a net mount must first be made, stiffened with a thicker wire than for the other ornament. To look well these buckles need to be fairly large, about eight inches long by five and a quarter inches wide. They are charming made of tiny roses or of forget-me-nots. If forget-me-nots are used they should have a pink blossom in each spray, as the effect of all-blue flowers is rather hard. The buckle should not take more than about one packet of these at 10 3/4 d., or two or three packets of wee roses at 6|d. the packet, but the amount required depends on how closely the flowers are placed. They need not be used too extravagantly, and if the net shape is first covered rather sparingly with green leaves - rose-leaves can be used if the correct foliage is not forthcoming - the buckle will look prettier and there will be a saving of flowers.

A charming idea is the lace quill or panel edged with tiny flowers and foliage.

Forget me not buckle, 8 inches by 5 1/2 made up on net and stiff wire

Forget-me-not buckle, 8 inches by 5 1/2 made up on net and stiff wire