New China from Old - A Novel and Easily Acquired Art - The Simple Outfit Necessary-directions for Making Crazy China

It is not everyone who knows how to make an old cracked pot or an ugly, common plate into "a thing of beauty and a joy for ever." But this can be done.

The first illustration represents a cracked earthenware jar which, though it had "lien amongst the pots," yet was transformed into a beautiful and a useful bowl for flowers.

A plate is a very easy article on which to practise the art of making crazy china, and affords a useful saucer for the crazy flower-pot which may be made afterwards.

A few pretty pieces of broken china or glass, a little putty, a bottle of gilding, an artistic eye, and a little patience are all that is needed with which to accomplish our task.

Take some putty, knead it well with the hands until nice and soft. A little oil may be added if the putty has been put by for some time and become hard. Then cover pot, covered with putty, in which is embedded a mosaic of frag ments of china. The handles are of putty, which has been gilded

The general effect is both rich and attractive the plate evenly with a thin layer of the putty - say one-eighth to a quarter of an inch thick - and make the surface as smooth as possible.

A bowl in crazy china made out of a cracked earthenware

A bowl in "crazy china " made out of a cracked earthenware

Having sorted out some bright and prettily decorated bits of broken china, break them up with a hammer into small pieces of as uniform a size as possible. Now arises an opportunity to show the possession of the artistic sense.

Each piece of china must be set separately and firmly into the putty, just as deep as the china is thick. The arranging of colours, shapes, and sizes must be left to the taste of the worker, but, unless the plate is to be covered with china of a uniform colour, it is not advisable to put two colours of the same shade next to one another. It is also well to leave about one-eighth of an inch of putty showing between the pieces, as this greatly adds to the effect when gilded. The gilding, however, must not be done until the putty is quite hard, and then it must be applied carefully, so as not to spoil the china.

After a smooth layer of putty has been applied to the surface of the article, pieces of pretty china, broken very small, are embedded in the putty, according to the worker's taste

After a smooth layer of putty has been applied to the surface of the article, pieces of pretty china, broken very small, are embedded in the putty, according to the worker's taste

Some prefer to cut away the putty that has bulged above the level of the china, whilst others leave it as it is - and only smooth the surface.

Many a broken vase, the shape of which was admired, can be mended and permanently held together with crazy china work to become once more a "thing of beauty."

Ingenious and attractive designs can be carried out when setting the china, and the broken handle or knob of a favourite vase can again come into use as the handle of a "crazy" pot.

The putty should be allowed to show between the pieces of china, and when it has set firmly should be gilded

The putty should be allowed to show between the pieces of china, and when it has set firmly should be gilded