The coat must now be turned up all round the bottom, and the raw edge herring-boned down very lightly with very fine silk. The merest thread of the material of the coat must be taken up on the needle, and the stitches must not be visible on the right side. Damp all the turnings that have been herring-boned down, on the wrong side, and press them well, being careful not to stretch the edge of the coat or collar. For the facing for the collar cut a piece of material, on the straight - i.e., the length of the collar along the cut edge, and the depth of it, selvedge-wise. N.b. - The reason the facing must be cut across the "cut edge" is that it may be stretched to the shape of the collar, and that the "grain "of it may match that of the back of the coat.

This facing must be cut slightly larger than the collar, so that it may be "eased" when being tacked over the canvas - otherwise the corners of the collar will turn up. Tack it over the canvas along the middle of the collar, turn in the edges of the facing so that it may just project beyondthe under edge of the collar, and tack it down neatly near the edge. Turn in each edge in the same way, from the "break" to the corner. Cut away all superfluous material at the corners and tack them down firmly and neatly.

N.B. - The reason the facing must be tacked to slightly project beyond the under edge of the collar is to enable the worker to fell the collar to the facing all round the outer edge and round the two corners to the "break."

From the "break," the facing must be cut off, turned in, and tacked down in a slanting direction towards the back of the coat, as shown in Diagram 2. Bring the edge of the facing of the "stand" down smoothly, and tack the raw edges down flat.

Cut the facing for the fronts and revers the same way of the material as the fronts of the coat, as shown in Diagram 3, long enough to be turned in at the bottom and to be turned in at the top, to meet the slanting line of the facing of the collar. Tack this facing flat all down the front of the coat, and " ease " it well over the revers, holding the revers over the hand, and tack towards the point.

Diagram 2. The facing must be cut off and tacked down in a slanting direction towards the back of coat

Diagram 2. The facing must be cut off and tacked down in a slanting direction towards the back of coat

N.B. - If the facing of the revers is put on too "tight" the points will turn up. Any superfluous "easing" must be shrunk away when the pressing is done. Instructions for shrinking will be given in the next lesson.

After the facing has been carefully tacked on, cut the edge of it to about half an, inch beyond the edge of the coat, and from the crease of the revers (or bottom of the "bridle") turn it in and tack it neatly down the front edge, so that the coat slightly projects beyond it.

Diagram 3. Facing for front and revers, to be cut from material left over as shown in Diagram 1, page 757

Diagram 3. Facing for front and revers, to be cut from material left over as shown in Diagram 1, page 757

On the revers it must be turned in and tacked so that the "facing" projects slightly beyond the coat. The short piece from the "break" must be cut off, turned in, and carefully tacked down in a slanting direction, just to meet, but not overlap, the facing of the collar.

Turn in and tack the "facing" of the front at the bottom to cover the turned up edge of the coat, and fell the facing to the coat - along the bottom and down the front edge, and fell the coat to the "facing" round the revers and collar.

N.B. - Great care must be taken not to show that the felling is reversed at the point where the revers turn back on the coat. The felling must be done very neatly - with silk to match the material, and no stitches must be taken through to the right side.

From the "break," the "facing' of the collar and of the revers must be joined together with silk to match the material, by a kind of invisible slipstitch. To do this, commence at the "break," and put the needle from underneath into one edge of the material, draw the silk through, and pass it straight across to take up a few threads along the material at the opposite edge; pass the silk back straight across, and take up a few threads of the material along the other edge. Continue this stitch from one edge to the other, to the end.

N.B. - This little seam must be very neatly worked so that the stitches may not show at all, or any canvas between the edges.

Before proceeding further with the work the coat must be thoroughly pressed all over. It is the weight and the time given to pressing which ensure good and lasting results - it should be done with a " tailor's goose," which is larger and heavier than a flat-iron. (See page 73, Part 1 Every Woman's Encyclopaedia.)